shellac -again on removal of

My question is on removing shellac. I am restoring my first piece - a handmade piano stool from the early 1800's(AUS). No glues and completely demountable. I ask if anyone knows the process for removing >.5mm thick shellac and still retain the greater part of the original patina for the wood. That or some pointers to a resource that describes a process. I am well aware of the "alcohol and scrub like a mad thing" and that is fine if it is the _only way_.. but I am told (anecdotal) that "professionals" have a dip and scrub 3 part process..any offers on that? I ask as I read where there is plenty of advice here on how to apply a shellac finish so I figure those that know how to put it on would have first discovered how to remove it? I intend to spray a coat (or two) of tinted oil on the cleaned surface.. as a finish.     ta:)
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eagerly awaiting replies about removal of shellac and retention of patina.
Have you used oil over shellac before?
I've always used oil over oil, so that it can both soak in and dry. I did use it a couple of times over impervious material, and each time it took a long time (month or more) to dry, and never did set up well.
That's what I know (not much)
Old guy Still frozen out of the shop

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The only other household chemical that I know of that will remove shellac is ammonia.
I have not ever had occasion to use it on a good workpiece and I certainly would not experiment on an antique.
I have seen furniture get "dipped" (into what, I don't know) by a professional restoration company. They always said to customers that there was risk of the wood cracking or splitting as a result of the dipping process. The chemical removed many layers of paint and who knows what, right down to bare wood.
J.
Mel Cucurbitae wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Weak ammonia (5%) will strip it, even if it's old and polymerised so that it has lost its taste for alcohol. Watch out doing this on oak though, as anything with tannins in it will darken from the ammonia.

Oil is reasonable, but why spray it, and why tint it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sat, Feb 10, 2007, 10:43pm (EST+16) snipped-for-privacy@not.a.plant.invalid (MelCucurbitae) doth admit: My question is on removing shellac. I am restoring my first piece - a handmade piano stool from the early 1800's(AUS). <snip>
I take it you are not worried about killing any possible antique value.
JOAT Only those who have the patience to do simple things perfectly will acquire the skill to do difficult things easily. - Johann Von Schiller
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.