Shellac

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I understand shellac may be used as a sealer, barrier coat. Does that work with latex paint? I've made some shelves that attach to the wall and plan on painting gross white latex. Could I use shellac as a primer/barrier for this purpose? The shelves are for indoors to place some pictures on for the wife.
Appreciate the feedback,
Thunder
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Yes you can use Shellac for a base coat. I do however recommend an alkyd oil based paint for shelves. Latex paint tends to stick to what ever you set on it.

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Leon wrote:

The technical term for this is "blocking". Not all latex paints do it, some will even be labelled "non-blocking", although it may be in the fine print. It's also more likely with glossier finishes.

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I have never used shellac so can't give any advice from personal experience but of what I hear, it should work just fine. The point of my post though was to caution you about the paint. For a shelf that things are going to sit on, latex paint is chancy. Some of it dries very hard and will cause no problems but with lot of it, you will have things sticking to it. It won't happen immediately but over time, they will stick. You would be much better off with oil base paint.

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Rolling Thunder wrote:

are the shelves? Knowing that would provide the Wreckers with the info needed to suggest the proper way to finish.
dave
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Which Bay Area? I'm originally from Oakland, myself.
Thunder
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wrote:

The top and bottom are lauan. The facing is floor trim molding.
Thunder
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Rolling Thunder wrote:

my military stint. I think Oakland is scary than 'Nam. :)
dave
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For the face board, I used molding trim. It is probably a pine. The top and bottom is lauan. I made these out of scraps. The wife was pointing to these shelves in a mail order and they were $50 each plus shipping. I thought that very excessive, so I thought I'd try my hand at making some. It took a couple proto types (grin) but I got the hang of it; compound cuts at 45 and 22 degrees. Dado'd to insert the tops and bottoms to the facing. Even made some keyholes with the router the son gave me for a birthday present.
Thanks for the guidance. Looks like another trip to HD for some oil based gloss white,
Thunder
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You're better off with a water-based acrylic latex. It will dry faster and the color will stay true (you mentioned indoor use). Also, you'll want to topcoat with shellac. It is the best finish for bookshelves, period. Even after a hundred years or so, it will not gum up the way oil-based products do when they break down. When shellac breaks down from age, it loses it's elasticity and crazes (cracks, Keeter). The nice feature is that it is repairable... even a hunnert years later. Nice, eh? Unless your books are covered in 80 grit, it's unlikely any book is ever going to damage a shellac finish.
You can rub out your shellac finish to whatever level of gloss you'd like, from satin to something resembling a piano finish.
If you're looking for antique finish, milk paint is a neato (yes, I said neato) choice. Just about all the mail-order wooddorking supply houses will carry it.
Humbly submitted, O'Deen
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Patrick Olguin wrote:

ATTENTION.
dave
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The shelves are made of floor trim molding (likely pine) and the tops and bottoms are of lauan. I made these from scraps in the wood pile. It took a couple prototypes (grin) to figure out the compound cuts, dadoing, and key holing.
The wife was pointing to these shelves in a mail order. I thought $50 a piece plus shipping was a way too high and made them instead.
Appreciate the comments about the latex paint. Hello Home Depot,
Thunder
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Rolling Thunder wrote:

shelves constantly, the requirements of a super hard finish will be greatly reduced. A tinted lacquer would work well and look great over the luan, once you get it sanded smooth and sealed with a vinyl sealer.
dave
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I'm just learning about finishing. What is a vinyl sealer? Could shellac work as well?
Would cutting the 3 lb shellac to 2 lb. be worthwhile doing as a sealer?
TIA,
Thunder
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Rolling Thunder wrote:

suggestion that has been repeated many times on the Wreck: pick up a copy of Bob Flexner's "Understanding Wood Finishing". page 134 will explain vinyl sealers, shellac, primers etc. vinyl sealer is TOUGH. when you want good adhesion and a durable lacquer surface, vinyl is the way to go.
as to the dewaxed shellac: a 2lb cut would work under some finishes, but it isn't recommended by Bob under poly. some guys use it anyway...
dave
ps another good book is Finishes & Finishing Techniques by Taunton Press. There is another favorite book by Wreckers but I am momentarily at a loss to remember the author. It'll come to me.
dave
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Dave,
OK, I'll look 'em up at the library.
Thanks,
BTW, I lived in San Jose 17 years a few blocks from the Milpitas city limits; off New Piedmont.
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Rolling Thunder wrote:

articles but don't have his book.
dave
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Do yourself a favor and get it! Visit his forums www.homesteadfinishing.com

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I usually recommend starting with Flexner for a good overview, then getting all of Jewitt's books. Besides a variety of techniques, IMHO he includes more practical information on the fine points than anybody else.
Regarding shellac under poly, I typically use a 1# cut of Homestead (Jewitt's company) dewaxed shellac under water base poly. It avoids many potential problems. GerryG
On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 12:26:51 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net"

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Absolutely. In fact, Zinsser B-I-N is a four pound cut of white pigmented shellac and is used in exactly this manner.
As for latex paint, if you use a vinyl latex, you will really need to wait about two weeks before it is completely cured so you won't get bad impressions from the weight of the pictures. Acrylic latex takes about the same time but results in a slightly harder film. Pigmented lacquer would be the best but is hard to find and handle.
Good Luck.

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