Shelf Pin Holes

Page 1 of 3  
I'm gonna brave the cold shop today. I might get to the shelf pin holes sometime this weekend on a project im working on.
Looking for any tips/tricks for making consistent shelf pin holes down a post. I have seen Nahmie use a jig before that he uses to line up the holes with a shelf pin as he moves down the post.
Got a favorite method?
Also, 1/4" dowels should do the trick in each corner right? This case is going to be loaded down pretty good I hear.
Thanks as always, Brian www.garagewoodworks.com
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

get a piece of predrilled masonite (used for hanging tools) to use as a template shelly
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 9, 12:54 pm, snipped-for-privacy@stny.rr.com wrote:

Nice. Neat idea. Hmmmm.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Jan 2010 09:54:11 -0800, smandel wrote:

Yes, but be careful. I once used a piece and found out a row here and there were a little off. Must have slipped during the drilling process. Not a problem if you know about it but I only found out when done :-(.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/9/2010 11:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@stny.rr.com wrote:

Only in a dire emergency ... not only will the holes wear out quickly from drilling and become inaccurate, but there are not necessary consistent in level.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is what I usually do. Mark top and bottom and any edge index marks you need. Clamp in place.
Cheap and often available in the scrap bin.
RonB
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is relatively inexpensive and much simpler than using a router like Norm uses. I have been using this jig for about 12 years. comes with a special Vix type bit that IIRC uses a brad point style bit. Can be used before or after assembly in many cases. http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?pageX76&filter=shelf%20jig
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

See also <http://www.plansnow.com/100108download.html
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the beauty to the Rockler jig is that the bit is self centering and does not/has not damaged the holes in 12 years od use.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/9/2010 12:38 PM, Leon wrote:

I have the Rockler jig too. Works like a champ.
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What are your thoughts on the 1/4" dowel. Should do it right?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What are your thoughts on the 1/4" dowel. Should do it right?
Yes you can use a dowel but I use the 1/4" hooks.
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 8&filter=shelf%20pins
They will not fall out when the shelf is in place and most of the pin does not show.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not only that.... if that one isn't large enough, if you have a drill press with a table, you can make your own. Make a jig to make a jig: set the fence to, say, 2" from the bit, set a piece of scrap plywood against the fence, and drill a hole in it the size of the collar on your Vix bit. (For a 1/4" bit, that's 3/8".) Move the plywood by the distance you want between the shelf pin holes, and clamp it to the table. This is your jig for making a jig.
Now lay the actual jig over the plywood, and position it where you want the first shelf-pin hole to be. Drill. Put a 3/8" dowel in the first hole you drilled in the plywood. Slide the jig over, and slip the hole you just drilled in it over the dowel in the plywood. Drill another hole. Repeat.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That's the one we use. We didn't think we would use it much but bought it because it wasn't a whole lot more than just buying the self centering bit. We use it all the time. We also made a longer one out of 1/4" plexi for use on tall bookcases that takes the same Rockler bits. It saves a little time over re-setting the Jig-It 2 or 3 times on a side.
Mike O.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote: --------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------ This is also Norm's latest weapon of choice.
Lew
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or last weapon of choice since NYW is done. I recall him using a large aluminum jig and plunging the router in each hole... I'd rather not be lifting the router that much.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote:

I made his earlier version using a piece of 9 ply birch.
HEAVY.
Lew
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The nice advantage to getting away from the router and using a drill is that you can go to any location and add holes after assembly if necessary. I have had customers ask me to add shelves to areas already built in in their homes. The Rockler set up with a drill make it a simple task.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 9 Jan 2010 17:23:06 -0800, the infamous "Lew Hodgett"

They're right proud of those things, aren't they? $22 a pop, and $7 for a replacement short bit. Vix bits ARE cool, though.
--============================================-- Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional. --- http://diversify.com/handypouches.html ToolyRoo(tm) and Possum(tm) Handy Pouches NOW AVAILABLE!
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
.cfm?pageX76&filter=shelf%20jig

Yeah they are a bit pricey but I have probably drilled 1-2 thousand holes with mine and have not yet replaced or sharpened the bit.
The bit being like Vix bit differs slightly in the union of the end of the bit and the jig. The end is not tapered like a regular Vix bit, it is flat bottomed with a collar. The bit fits precicely in the hole and is flat bottomed to help insure that the bit is 90 degrees to the jig.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.