sheet goods software

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Has anyone used software to help get the most out a sheet of plywood? I can kind of do this with using the "colorforms" method. Rather try with software. Thanks
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I use TurboCad for this. You can also use Photoshop.
--
www.garagewoodworks.com



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Cut List Plus - www.Cutlistplus.com has a demo version that lets you specify the upto 5 shapes at a time I used it to cut the panels to make my a set of kitchen cabinets. I like it. There is another called Sheet layout 9 - www.sheetlayout.com. I have looked at it only briefly and have not spent enough time to form an opinion. Matt

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I used the Sheet Layout from Drummond - freeware version and later an evaluation version. It allowed me to determine how best to use a sheet of plywood to get the most out of a sheet. Worked fine for me. http://www.sheetlayout.com/products.htm
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Drummond? I don't recall that being Don's last name. ;~)
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A free, no frills, CutList program is available at http://www.delphiforfun.org/Programs/CutList.htm -- JeffB remove no.spam. to email
goaway wrote:

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Cutlist is pretty much the standard tool if you don't own a full blown cabinet software package. It is better at sheet goods than it is with lumber but it works for both. There are a few different versions and as someone mentioned a demo version. I own it and have used it quite a bit at times. I find it pretty much bullet proof and I am in the software business in my day job.

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wrote:

folks: http://www.optimizecutter.com /
The free version is full featured except that the layouts cannot be printed. No real hindrance for hobby type work, but would be a pain to use in a production shop. I like the ability to import profiles and nest non-rectangular parts. Works just as well for board stock as it does for sheet stock (Just treat the board as if it were a sheet).
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Wed, Nov 14, 2007, 8:24pm snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net (goaway) doth queryeth: Has anyone used software to help get the most out a sheet of plywood? I can kind of do this with using the "colorforms" method. Rather try with software. Thanks
Just my brain. Works just fine. My dau-in-law got me to make some of those pukey white yard art reindeer for her. Copied some pictures off the web, figured out the scale using my trusty engineer ruler, and 1/4" graph paper, and sketched them out on the graph paper. Made an extra copy of everything, cut 'em out, laid 'em out on a page of graph paper, moved them around until I optimized the cut pattern. No prob. I sincerely doubt I'd use computer software for anything, worked with computers for years, and for me, that'd turn something fun nto work. I'd rather just figure it all out my self. Only took me about 3-4 hours as it was.
JOAT The whole of life is a learning process. - John Keel
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(goaway) doth queryeth:

LOL, I am working on a project, well 2 identical projects that have 240 pieces total and 28 different sized pieces. Would you like to graph that out for me? It all needs to come out of 12, 1x6x10' and a 5'x5' piece of Baltic Birch. This is where Cutlist Plus shines. ;~)
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"J T" wrote:

I'm with you except I like 8x8 paper.
For a one off job, takes more time to learn the software, then load the data, than it does to sketch out the job and get busy with the scissors.
Lew
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Awh, and like it takes no time to learn to use those "scissors". ;~)
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DO NOT, REPEAT, DO NOT RUN WITH SCISSORS!
--
NuWave Dave in Houston



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"Dave In Houston" wrote:

They don't let me have the pointy ones.
Lew
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"Leon" wrote:

Learn it once, you never forget.
Just like a slide rule or a bicycle<G>.
Lew
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Thu, Nov 15, 2007, 5:37pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (LewHodgett) doth sayeth: I'm with you except I like 8x8 paper. For a one off job, takes more time to learn the software, then load the data, than it does to sketch out the job and get busy with the scissors.
Actually that was the first time I've used graph paper in I don't know how long. Most stuff I just design in my head, with "maybe" a rough sketch or two, and a batch of measurements. Works so far.
JOAT The whole of life is a learning process. - John Keel
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On Thu, 15 Nov 2007 17:37:57 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

When I was in college, I worked in a lumberyard for a bit. I was one of the "yard monkeys" that loaded up trucks and performed various manual labor tasks outside. One of the most disliked tasks by the other yard monkeys was "sawyer". You'd be given a takeoff list from a house package, and gather up the materials to cut the jack studs, headers, etc. The reason that the other yard monkeys didn't like the job was that it entailed thinking, when they'd rather be taking a smoke break. I, on the other hand, loved doing it, so I became the sawyer almost full time. (They called me "head sawyer" which almost got me to change my major from engineering to brain surgery, hahaha...) We had a 16" radial arm saw that was nicknamed "Killer" but that's a story for another day...
The header beams ranged anywhere from 4x6 to 6x12 and up. I made it a personal challenge to lay out the materials for a house package with the absolute smallest amount of waste possible. I did it with a calculator and a pencil, usually taking between 5 and 15 minutes per house. My usual amount of waste was around 6-8 inches on a 20 foot beam. Once in a while I'd get "in the groove" and produce a cutlist that had NO waste, other than the saw kerfs.
That makes you feel REAL good. Beat that, computer!
The point is, you CAN do it if you set your mind to it. I have regularly produced sheet (plywood) cutlists, by hand, that were easier to cut than those generated by software. The layout software may occasionally beat me on the efficiency of the layout (ie the waste left over) but I can usually get a cutlist that is easier to cut out or has better grain matching.
--
Bob the Tomato


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Fri, Nov 16, 2007, 12:50am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net (Leon) doth sayeth: LOL, I am working on a project, well 2 identical projects that have 240 pieces total and 28 different sized pieces. Would you like to graph that out for me? It all needs to come out of 12, 1x6x10' and a 5'x5' piece of Baltic Birch. This is where Cutlist Plus shines. ;~)
Hey, no prob. Send the plywood, and I'll take care of it.
Cutlist Plus. Electric sissors, right?
JOAT The whole of life is a learning process. - John Keel
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I had a project back at the ol' lumberyard which was similar. A local company needed some specialized packing crates, lots and lots of them. We had a vertical panel saw which could rip and crosscut (you've probably seen those at Home Depot). I spent some time tuning it up and got to work. We delivered the parts for 200 packing crates (made of 3/4" baltic birch) three days later, banded and wrapped. Somewhere I have a picture that a coworker snapped while I was working at the saw, almost shin-deep in sawdust!
Seriously, if you need help with this layout, post details and we'll tear it up!
--
Bob the Tomato

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Cutlist is my vote. But if you like graph paper. Here is a link to print may types of graph paper on your printer (even customizable): http://www.incompetech.com/graphpaper /
Dave
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