Shed Question

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That's pretty similar to my build. It was a 10x16 kit from 84 Lumber a couple decades ago. I did a thorough prep/paint job on it initially and have yet to need to do a recoat. Only problem has been the dang doors. Almost bought a double-door steel and framed kit from Menard's to hang in place but it's triple what I'd pay ro repair using same material and has a minimum six week order waiting period. I waited last year and they were continually delayed so I canceled till this year and then other stuff got in the way before I could get to work on it. So, here I sit pondering my options. I hope to get it done before the end of the month. `Casper
PS ... I do appreciate the input from everyone. I do prefer to check all my options before making a final decision and commecning on a project. So thanks to everyone. ;)
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YMMV but I don't think caulking is a very good fix for the tops of boards that are attached to something else.
Better, IMO, is pressure treated lumber. Barring that, bevel the top edge of the horizontal board; even better is to bevel and bed. One could use caulking to bed...one could also use plumber's putty. Perhaps the best bedding material is "boatyard bedding compound" which is essentially plumber's putty with a wood preservative.
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wrote:

I'd rather flash the top so water can't get at the wood at all. PT doesn't help much at all. I've repaired/replaced plenty of water damaged PT, over the years.
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Only cheap solution I could come up with was to fill the top edges of the boards to make the water run off. I believe the lumber is pressure treated but I'm not positive. Thought about plumber's putty and might use that instead. I'm certainly open to suggestions.
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Work in progress. Check a.b.pictures.woodworking for photo. `Casper
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On Tuesday, October 21, 2014 5:42:48 PM UTC-5, Casper wrote:

It's looking good.
If there's some good sturdy framing above the door and along that gambrel r oof line, then maybe frame and install a 2' overhang above the door. If t he framing is lacking, then make some simple corbels or triangle braces, to brace the overhang. If that's 5/8" T1-11, then it, along, might be sturdy enough to support corbels or Tri braces for a 2' wide overhang.
If not an overhang, a simple drip edge, above the doors, would help, some.
Prime all that T1-11, even behind the door facings and along the edges of t he T1-11, before you cover it up with facings. Fill the T1-11 grooves, at the bottoms where the facings are, with caulk, so water doesn't get down in side, behind the facings.
Clean the siding with Clorox and Jomax, before priming and painting. *A ga llon of Jomax is enough to clean a 2000 sq ft house.
Remove the hinges/hardware and prime & paint behind the hardware. When pri ming and painting rough T1-11 surface, use a 3/4" nap roller, so the primie r and paint gets down into the roughness. After application, run a paint b rush over it, to smoothen it.
Are there any spots, along the T1-11 siding, where the bottom edges are sta rting to decay or rot, possibly needing replacing within the next year? I have some recommendations for replacing bottom edges.
Sonny
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Thanks.

There is one brace and one 2x4 at the front where you see the missing trim. Not sure how sturdy it is right now but I would like to strengthen it up so I can add an locking up-bolt behind the left door. Added one on the bottom but door is still pretty flexible at the top.

Was considering that as an option. Would love to have a bit more of an overhang to protect from rain and snow but haven't decided what yet.

Some of the T1 is primed behind the trim but we ran out of time for the day so have to try to get the rest this weekend.

I powerwashed the entire shed, including roof (loaded with green growing inedible stuff) in the spring but at least the left side needs it again from all the muddy splash up during the storms this year.

I used Zin primer spray along some of the channels along the framing and under the left trim. Didn't have time yet to bring out the roller.

Yes, the two long sides have decay in various stages along the bottom. Too much splashing up from the ground when it rains.
I'll be very glad when this project is complete and off the to-do list of repairs. It's been a thorn in my side for the last 18-24 mos with everything that has kept me from working on it.
Thanks for the tips!
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On Wednesday, October 22, 2014 10:55:27 AM UTC-5, Casper wrote:

Flexible door: You might want to install a diagonal board/brace on the ins ide of your door, to help keep it from flexing (and eventually warping). Prime and paint the inside of the doors and the edges. Caulk any voids on the edges.
Refer to the first 4 pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/?deta ils=1
The edges of a 3/4" nap roller will easily roll primer and paint deep into those T1 grooves. Just whisk your paint brush along the groove, after the roller application.... piece-of-cake for getting primer and paint (proper c overage) deep into those grooves. T1-11 sometimes has voids between the pl ies and they show in those grooves. Caulk those voids!
Assuming you'll cut the rotted/decayed bottom edges with a circular saw, at tach a 1X below your cut line and set your saw to 30 degrees, for the cut. Cutting at 45 degrees causes the saw to jam more (awkward position, cuttin g sideways, I find), since the surface is likely to be somewhat uneven. Le ss jamming with a 30 degree cut. You want a bevel cut, upward, to the insi de. This bevel allows for a 30 degree drip edge, if you'd like one. Caulk the installed drip edge.
Your replacement siding will be bevel cut on both the upper and lower edges , the bottom edge being a knife-edge drip line, hence any water won't wick across the bottom edge (since there will be no flat bottom edge) and/or up the back side of the new siding, i.e., "skirt". Before installing the skir t, install some 6" or 8" flashing behind it, along the lower edge. Also, b efore installing the skirt, prime and paint the lower beveled edge and a ro ller's width up the backside of the skirt.
A bevel cut, for the edges, allows for better mating of the edges, also. S quare cuts look like crap, they simply don't match/mate, well, unless you a ttach a backer board between the studs.
In the future, only the skirt will need to be replaced and no additional cu tting for the repaired sections, i.e., pop the old one off, install a new o ne. Caulk the seams.
Sonny
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Hadn't thought to do a diagnal brace but I'll consider it. The doors weren't wapred; only the side 2x4 that the T1 was nailed into. That's been replaced and might need to on the right side as well.

Did a real good job on that when I first painted it. I'll have to get a photo of the back and side which shows how much better it held up.

I like the skirting idea. Did you use regular metal flashing?

I like the idea of being able to replace just the skirt in the future. I plan to dig out some of the ground next spring, edge and fill it in with rock. Not sure if we'll do that to both sides. Muddiest area seems to be between the house and shed.
I greatly appreciate the tips! Next year I hope to clean out the inside and fix a few minor spots finally showing a little damage. Any recommendations there?
`Casper
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On 10/23/2014 11:14 AM, Casper wrote:

Rethink that plan, Casper
I really liked the tip on this as presented, however, at my home, the areas where I am having the problem with siding rotting out due to water exposure are a) where concrete extends right up to the foundation and b) where the area beneath the drip line from the roof, was dug out and "finished" with gravel (septic stone, actually). Water hits either surface and bounces back up 4" - 7" or so and soaks in.
Where there are evergreens, ground cover, etc. there is no problem. You might do better with gutters and downspouts. Based on my experience, a hard surface isn't going to help.
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On Thursday, October 23, 2014 9:37:10 PM UTC-5, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Right, I agree. Casper seems to be on a budget, so, right now, he can only do so much. Gutters, etal, including the French drain, are/may be future projects, but at least he has some ideas to consider.
Sonny
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On Thursday, October 23, 2014 11:14:51 AM UTC-5, Casper wrote:

Not warping, in the traditional sense of a board warping, but it flexes and , with time, tends to stay in a flexed position. The temporary T1 doors, o n the back of my shop garage, flexed and, now, is pretty much bent, in a p ermanent position, making it hard to close and padlock the doors.

I think so. It's galvanized sheet metal, comes in a roll 15" to 18" wide. I don't recall the width I used. I installed 30# felt adjacent to the stu ds, then the flashing, then the skirt.
> I like the idea of being able to replace just the skirt in the future.

I installed this kind of skirting on my old garage and have had to replace 2 areas. It seems to work well, so I've used the skirting idea on the shop remodel. Those Flickr pics are of the shop's garage. Here's another pic, during shop remodel/construction. https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/4733385477/in/photostream
Sonny
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On Thursday, October 23, 2014 11:14:51 AM UTC-5, Casper wrote:

Install a perforated 4" PVC drain pipe within the rock/gravel. This reduce s the amount of gravel your trench requires (& reduces cost for gravel). T his French drain system should help along your homes foundation, also. Con tinue with the (solid) pipe (or some flex pipe) away from your foundation, if possible.
Sonny
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I am still going to do this just to keep it cleaner. All the leaves in the surrounding 200ft radius seem to end up here. Add mud to that and you have a pain in the a%& to get leaves out along with muck. So it was planned for based on more than the shed issues.

I've done the french drain once a long time ago back east. Used it for a couple things and it worked well enough in an area with a high water table, clay base and sandy soil.
I was thinking to try that here but the previous person threw down some concrete (originally there was an old deck there) and I really don't want to try and hammer that out. So I will have to look (in spring) to see if any under drain is possible. If so, I will.
Train your mind to test every thought, ideology, train of reasoning, and claim to truth.
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If it weren't for the budget right now, I'd be doing way more here. Sadly we still have a leak in the roof and some house shifting to remedy that is tapping into our budget unexpectedly.
Right now the second door is going up. I've primed/painted the underside of the side trim so those hinges won't have to be removed later. Now I am trying to decide on how to do the trim above the door to cover the gap effeciently and maybe add a bit of rain protection.
Btw ... it's she, not he. Ironically my husband isn't into doing this kind of stuff but I love it. I even enjoy painting. Yeah, I know. ;) `Casper
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