shed design

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Looking to build a "small shed" (8x10) to store excess wood/garden tools.
While I have close to 2 acres, the most likely spots are a bit close to the house.
I have a spot in mind, but as I've gone through a variety of plans, and designs, I find that the overall roof height is a bit imposing for the site I've blocked off. I think I can modify one or more of the designs by reducing the wall height and the pitch. I don't have to worry about snow, just rain.
Most of the 8x10 shed designs seem to have 8x12 or 9x12 pitch. I'm thinking of reducing that to 3x12.
My question, from an aesthetics point of view would that low pitch roof look odd on a 8x10 shed?
I have some boards I put up to give a sense of the heights that are in the plans I have and to be honest, the heights just looks huge. I want something more discrete and not so noticable. Perhaps I should look for another spot?
MJ
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Sounds like a good excuse to use the SketchUp (free 3-D Modeling program). You could model all of the important features of your yard and move various incarnations of your shed around. You could start with a photo of your yard taken from Google Earth and get everything to scale. This can be done alot faster than you may think. After doing that, there will be few surprises for you. I find it mildly amusing that you can do all of this without even going outside. I can verify my lot size to the inch (maybe a foot, I forget) with Google Earth.
Bill
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If it's for a workshop, he could use Grizzly's workshop planner. Can't get much easier. http://grizzly.com/workshopplanner.aspx
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Upscale wrote:

But it's for a backyard and a shed. Once you learn how to use the software, it's PDQ. And the model created will serve as a good starting point on the next project that comes around.
Bill
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Upscale wrote:

Upscale, you meant for the inside of the shed... I gothcha. Ignore my previous post.
Bill
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No problem. The planner also has a misc. category tool which you can size to any dimension you want. You can use that to substitute for any planned shed furniture like a potting bench or something similar.
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My first shed was 8x12 and it was close to useless. Filled that sucker up in the blink of an eye, and it was a bitch to get stuff out because it was packed to the gills. My 90 year old neighbor yelled at me when I built it, saying a shed can't be too big. I told him because of property lines, that was as big as I could go. He said put some of it on his property, he didn't care. I said what about when your not here... He said "where am I going?" He was 92 and still worked 7 days a week, 12 hours a day...
My next shed was 14' long by 16' wide with a second floor. I designed it 25 years ago with Design Cad and it took me 40 hours or more to figure out how to use design cad. I could have done it on paper in an hour. Sketchup would be the way to go today, but that too has a nice learning curve, but well worth it.
I made it so the first floor was 6'2" so I wouldn't have to duck. The roof I made to fit full sheets of plywood. The shed at the peak is 15' because the building guy said if it was over 15' it would be taxed and subject to all the building nonsense governments impose upon. The second floor is GREAT because you can store so much more, and it doesn't cost much more to build.
I tucked mine into some trees in the back of my property. Here's a picture I took last year. Still in perfect shape after 25 years and numerous snows up to 3'. This shed is just right for me, not too big, not too small. I have to say it was one of the most satisfying things I've designed and built. Oh, I remember cruising a local shed dealer for design ideas, some of which I incorporated into mine.
http://jbstein.com/Flick/Shed1030100.jpg
My suggestion is to build it big as you can afford. 2 acres is enough land to accumulate lots of lawn and garden stuff. Before you start designing, go to a place that sells sheds and look them over, see what you like.

If you use sketchup, you can get a really good idea of what it will look like. If you build an eyesore, which many sheds are, hide it. If you make it aesthetically pleasing, you can put it in the open. I would think 2 acres is plenty of room for a rather large shed or small barn.
--
Jack
You Can't Fix Stupid, but You Can Vote it Out!
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wrote:

Like your 14' long by 16' wide. How much snow can the roof take? Denis M

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On 2/20/2011 11:44 AM, Denis M wrote:

Yes, it turned out nice. I saw a 16 long by 14' wide commercial jobs, but none that were wider than deep. It looked good on paper, and it looks even better live.

Up to 3' so far, and it's built of 2x4's on 24" center's. I made the trusses myself, but used those metal truss plates to connect them. They were flimsy as all get out until I got some structure on them.
I'm not a builder but knew these are commonly used in houses, but I am a woodworker and after I built the shed, and even though the trusses seemed strong as hell, the next year I made wooden plates out of scrap plywood, cut them on the band saw and glued and nailed them to every joint, right over top of the metal plates. I figured the only thing that could go wrong is the joints spread as the roof transfers all the weight onto the side walls. I imagine it could take quite a bit of snow.
The biggest snow we've had in the past 25 years was supposedly 3' about 10 years ago. I measured it because no where did I see 3', and the media always lies through their teeth, and best I got was 2 feet, so they were off by about 33%, about right for the lame ass media.
Last year we got 2 feet, which I measured to about 19 inches. The shed is nestled in trees, and gets less snow than out in the open.
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Jack
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wrote:

<snip>
Where did you get the truss plates? I couldn't buy them as I'm not certified to design wooded trusses. From the Simpson Strong-Tie web site:
"Can I use your mending plates for truss fabrication?
The mending plates shown in the Simpson Strong-Tie catalog are not intended for structural use. They have not been tested for structural applications and are not load rated. Metal Plate Connected Wood Trusses require specific design criteria as outlined by the Truss Plate Institute and in the current ANSI/TPI documents. Software specific to truss design is available through a number of truss plate suppliers. For more information regarding truss plate suppliers, contact the Truss Plate Institute at (608) 833-5900. "
http://www.strongtie.com/productuse/faq-general.html
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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On 2/21/2011 11:33 AM, Nova wrote:

Probably at 84 lumber. This was around 25 years ago, and I can see absolutely no reason anyone couldn't use them. Are you still allowed to use nails w/o certification?

A quick search shows
http://www.trusspe.com/index.php?page=connector-plates
sells them, and they look the same as I used. Looked like anyone could buy them but I didn't look into it.
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Jack
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wrote:

I hold that kind of thing in the same contempt I hold stick-in connectors on light switches and wall outlets: They're fatal errors just waiting to happen.
-- The more passions and desires one has, the more ways one has of being happy. -- Charlotte-Catherine
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On 2/22/11 1:20 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Really? So the guys who engineered and spec'd out those switches were all idiots? I suppose there are thousands of houses burning down every year and the government's hiding it all because of the powerful Leviton lobby.
--

-MIKE-

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I realize they are not burning down houses, but I don't usually use them on my own work. I have had to troubleshoot non working circuits, and traced the problem to a stab connector not making reliable contact. Both times, the failure happened at around 7 years, in an outlet that had not been disturbed.
--
Jim in NC


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On 2/23/2011 2:12 AM, Morgans wrote:

I think if you look at your circuit breaker you will see a stab type connector.
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Jack
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On 2/23/2011 9:22 AM, Jack Stein wrote:

Oops, you were talking about the stab type without a screw. I was thinking the stab type with a plate you screw down vs the wrap around screw type. Sorry bout that...
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Jack
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wrote:

I've never even -seen- a circuit breaker without screw terminals.
-- "Human nature itself is evermore an advocate for liberty. There is also in human nature a resentment of injury, and indignation against wrong. A love of truth and a veneration of virtue. These amiable passions, are the latent spark. If the people are capable of understanding, seeing and feeling the differences between true and false, right and wrong, virtue and vice, to what better principle can the friends of mankind apply than to the sense of this difference?" --John Adams
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In the US? Nope I have only used screw down terminal breakers. I have never seen a stab type.
--
Jim in NC


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"Jack Stein" wrote:

----------------------------------- "Morgans" wrote:

------------------------------- It depends.
In the US, "plug-in" c'bkrs are used in residential load center panels while "bolt-on" c'bkrs are used in industrial panel boards.
As far as the c'bkr it self is concerned, both c'bkrs have the same operating innards.
Lew
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On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 17:13:47 -0500, "Morgans"

The load connections on any breaker I've seen are always screw types, but the connection from the panel buss bar to the input of the breaker is often via a spring clip. (Square D type QO, for example.)
--
Peter Bennett, VE7CEI
peterbb4 (at) interchange.ubc.ca
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