Shear strength of screws

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On 4/11/2012 8:33 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You simply cannot make a blanket statement like the above without checking your local building code, as well as the Engineering specifications for the particular structure.
Without question, you will most assuredly find that your options in that regard are severely limited when it comes to structural members.
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On 4/11/2012 9:00 PM, Swingman wrote:

I don't think he was addressing "approval by political elect", but structural reliability.
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WTF does "approval by political elect" have to do with building codes and structural requirements set forth by an engineer?
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On 4/11/2012 10:20 PM, Swingman wrote:

Clare's a pretty decent engineer.
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On 4/12/2012 12:54 AM, Richard wrote:

Then he should know better than to make a blanket statement indicating that a fastener/method claiming to be "fully code compliant" with a model building code is not necessarily accepted by any jurisdiction using that model building code as a basis for building standards.
Pex is "fully code compliant", just try using it in building a house many in jurisdictions across the US.
When an engineer calls for a specific fastener, joist hanger, strapping method, etc, in an approved structural/framing plan, he does so in compliance with the specifics of the local code in the jurisdiction in which the structure is built. Any deviation from the engineer's specific fastener, joist hanger, strapping method by someone implementing the plan risks obtaining both engineering approval of the "as built" structure, and failure of any inspection under that jurisdition's code.
In short, just because something is claiming to be "fully code compliant", does not mean that it can be used.
Once again, check your local building code, and your engineer approved structural plan, BEFORE using any fastener in structural members.
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Has there been noticeable resistance to it? To me anyway, it looks like the ultimate plumbing product. At least for the current state of the art.
Have you heard about this Karl? http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2001/may/03/wonder-wire-puts-up-no-resistance
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On 4/12/2012 8:20 AM, Dave wrote:

Absolutely in some areas, to the point that it can not be used. Although as soon as some of these old farts on jurisdiction's zoning and building standards boards retire, that should be subject to change.

http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2001/may/03/wonder-wire-puts-up-no-resistance Pretty cool ... heretofore most of that stuff is/was done at temperatures not found outside a laboratory, but I expect it won't be long before it becomes a reality in the real world.
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On 4/12/12 9:35 AM, Swingman wrote:

Tru dat. Most resistance to new, better technology comes from old school technophobes often entrenched in a corrupt system protecting their fellow old schoolers and the technology they profit the most from. If you can sit on a house for 3 days, sweating copper and charging like it's rocket surgery, why would you switch to Pex and only get a 1/2 day's labor, then have to go find another client?
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On 4/12/2012 9:44 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

+1
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instead of time and materials. Contractor is used to, say, $3500 to plumb the house in copper, so he's REAL happy to pay $2500 to have it done in PEX - while $1400 would still be making the plumber money.
But in MY opinion, a house plumbed with copper just looks so much NEATER, and more professional than the "spiderwebs" of PEX that I see in a lot of new houses. Nothing requires PEX to be run in straight lines with neat 90 degree bends - so the "cheap" plumber just runs the crap in the shortest, easiest route, looks be damned.
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On 4/12/12 12:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Except that a good General Contractor isn't an idiot and keeps track of the prevailing labor rates and costs of materials and know what a job should cost. Free market would drive that other plumber out of business real quick when the $1400 guy starts getting all the work. Hence, his other old school buddy down on the local code board.

Boooo! Bad answer, you sound like an old guy. :-) There are lazy, sloppy plumbers who do shoddy work with whatever material they are working with. I've seen some ugly ass copper piping with big balls of solder stuck all over the joints and all kinds of extraneous elbows and crap with bad decisions in where to run the lines where the lines are in the way of everything that comes later, pipes too close to the outside of studs and plates. And I've seen great copper jobs.... the kind that belongs in instruction books.
In my experience, the guys who care about their work, care about it when they did copper and they care about it after moving to Pex. Why run Pex in straight run with 90 degree bends if you don't have to? If it's not in the way and it makes sense, why do it it based on the same physical restrictions as copper? If it's neater to do it that way and works out better, then do it. But don't do it just because "that's the way we did copper."
I've seen some beautiful Pex runs from manifolds and nothing was messy and you could trace every line. It's the plumber, not the plumbing.
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wrote:

leakproof job in Pex than it is in copper. And it's a lot easier to make a neat looking job with copper - particularly if you know what you are doing with the copper. It was a lot easier with pB solder too.
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On 4/12/12 2:12 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

I would rank it higher given the claims to be impervious to freeze burst. I'm also in love with these gator/shark/etc. connectors and valves.
While remodeling the bathrooms, I planned to keep a working vanity sink while it's all going on. Those gator valves and a rubber P-trap connected with a hose clamp allow me to move the vanity in and out in about 3 minutes. I leave the P-trap connected to the wall waste and it maintains the trap water to keep out the stink.
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wrote:

install. I use sharkbites on copper in locations where soldering would be difficult/dangerous/impossible or where I can see having to disconnect them sometime in the possibly forseable future. I wouldn't use them as standard practice in place of a soldered joint on copper, or a clamped joint on PEX.
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On 4/12/12 9:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Is there a reason for this, other than looks? I was planning on replacing it, but honestly, I can't think of easier access for clean-out.

Again, why? Do they have a track record of leaking? I haven't been using sharkbites for standard, permanent connections, simply because crimps are so cheap and easy. But the sharkbite valves are only about 20% more than regular valves and are high quality ball valves.
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wrote:

deteriorate into mush in 5 years. I used one ONCE. Never again. The interior went first - everything stuck to it, so the drain was ALWAYS slow. I put in a self clearing trap. It has a "vane" for lack of a better description that you turn with a knob and the trap is cleared of whatever has deposited in it. Made of clear Lexan, if I remember correctly.

Not that I'm aware of, or I wouldn't use them at all, particularly in difficult applications. I just find them expensive, clunky, and complex for normal use. Heck, I can solder, so why would I use them for normal joints????

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On 4/13/12 1:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've seen the lexan one. As for your experience with the rubber trap... I suspect someone may have used liquid plumber in it, which was probably what gummed it up.

Because they are a lot easier and from what I've seen, higher quality. BTW, they aren't as expensive around here. They regular valves, when cheaper, are only 20% or less cheaper than the gator valves.

Hey, don't look now, but I think there are some kids on your lawn! :-p
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On 4/13/2012 5:44 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

+1
<while wondering whether Canadian humo(u)r is sufficiently akin for that to register?)
:)
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On 4/12/2012 12:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I prefer the advantages of how PEX is usually installed over the looks of copper how copper is typically installed.
In south Texas we ocassionally get a harsh winter. Pipes freeze, copper pipes seem to be the first to burst.
PEX expands and is less likely to break and in my case comes with a 10 year warranty. Additionally PEX is normally run through a mainfold. The previous winter I was able to shut off water to the out side hose bibs from the manifold and open the bibs to drain the water before the freeze. I had running water for all of the i other nterior faucets.
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Is there any need to drain PEX? (Despite it's resistance to freezing)
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