sharpies and poly and skunk lines on a cribbage board

Hello,
I am making a few cribbage boards. I am drawing the "skunk" lines on the board My first try I did it with a fine point sharpie. I let the sharpie dry for about an hour. When I put on the first coat of spray poly (aerosol can, oil based ) the sharpie bled all over the place. Which surprised me because if the kids touch anything with those markers it is there forever.
I sanded it all off and tried to draw the lines after a coat of poly but the marker didn't work well.
Do I need to go buy a paint marker or use a different method with the poly. Please don't say paint with a fine brush.
Thanks
Larry C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BTW The wood I used this time was Ash. The next couple I make I hope to use white oak. If that matters
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Larry,
When I make my cribbage boards, I use a fine tip paint pen for the lines. You can get the pens at the hobby stores. I've used the pens on many types of wood. I've never had any runs when finishing with poly.
Dan

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dan
Can I ask how you drill the holes? I used a template from Rockler. It worked OK but it was a a pain to keep from moving during the process.
Thanks for the advice about the pain pens
Larry C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In that case, you drill at opposing end holes first, then put in a pin or three to keep the template in place whilst drilling the rest of them.
You're welcome...*smirk*
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In that case, you drill at opposing end holes first, then put in a pin or three to keep the template in place whilst drilling the rest of them.
You're welcome...*smirk*
The template holes 1/4" are bigger than the holes 1/8" that are drilled in the board. The template is made to be used with a self centering bit setup. Went by Rockler and they don't have a pin that would do the trick. I might try double stick tape on the next one I do.
Larry C
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Larry,
I use the same template. I just tape it in place with masking tape. And use the self centering drill bit. That works fine for me. Glad to help. Good luck.
Dan

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have never tested it but just had the thought of using a Shellac coat first since Shellac is sort of the universial undercoat for seperation. However, not sure if the alcohol will also act as a solvent on the sharpie ink and cause the same problem.
Another possibility is to try water based poly.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Pigma marker pens might work.
http://www.sakuraofamerica.com/Pen-Archival
I don't know how oil based finish would work with them. My wife has used them with good result in watercolours so if they work on wood then maybe water based finish will serve..
I discovered them when they first came out and used them all the time for awhile. They may have changed the tip material since but I found that the tips soon wore away on any paper that had a real tooth to it.
On oak, I can see a problem with jitter if you don't fill the pores and get a smooth surface first.
If I had to do this for more than a few boards, I'd probably buy/make the silk-screen equipment I've back-burnered for too long, relearn a few forgotten skills and do a photo silk screen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A draftsmans ruling pen (the old type with adjustable nib) lays down perfect lines with paint. Just thin the paint to the consistency of ink, fill the pen (use a dropper, don't dip it) and draw lines.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A draftsmans ruling pen (the old type with adjustable nib) lays down perfect lines with paint. Just thin the paint to the consistency of ink, fill the pen (use a dropper, don't dip it) and draw lines.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Have access to a woodburning setup, Larry?
I made toys for the grandkids and ran into the same problem... The Danish Oil I was using lifted and faded my lines..
I ended up scoring the lines with a ruler and awl and then my wife used her pyrography (what they call an expensive woodburning setup) pen to burn the lines in..

mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

disk). Make up a pattern you like and mirror image it with any graphics program. Tape it to the wood, printed side down. Rub the back of the page with the transfer tip and the ink transfers to the wood. I've used shellac, poly, boiled linseed oil and lacquer over it and haven't had one bleed yet. If you have a good enough graphics program you can even print your drilling pattern at the same time.
A few tips: Practice practice practice... it takes time to get it right Drafting vellum seems to work best at giving up the ink to the wood A little pressure helps The smoother the wood the better the transfer (I go to 320 grit) You can transfer darn near anything you can get on paper mirror imaged (lines, drill pattern, text, signature, etc) Daryl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.