Sharpening question


I have an old router plane blade shaped rather like the following (except the bevel is about 30 degrees)
    | | /|\     | |    |     | |    |     | | 2 1/2"     | |    |     | |    |     | |_______\/____         ___     |     \ |     | \ - bevel |     | \ 1/4"     |___________________________\ _|__
    |_______ 1" _________________|     | |
I find this configuration a real bear to sharpen (as the blade is only 3/8" wide and thus very prone to rock). Do any of you have any suggestions as to some sort of jig or other method of geting a straight and even bevel?
TIA Glen
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Here is how I sharpen my router plane blade. Grinding has to be done on the side of the wheel due to the shape of the tool. The resulting flat surface is hand sharpened by coarse and then finer stones. I do this by running the blade along the length of the stones with the stone box held securely in a vise. Now for the soapbox: Why not learn how to hold your tools flat against the stone rather than depending on a sharpening jig? This tool is especially difficult because hollow grinding is not possible. The hand router plane is one of my favorite tools, not used often but really nice when appropriate. Dave
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Dave, many people do not have the dexterity or fine motor control to be able to do this. Its not a matter of learning. Its impossible. Also, some types of blades are very difficult to hand sharpen reliably. A Stanley #8 jointer blade comes to mind. There's absolutely nothing wrong with using a jig.
Bob
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BillyBob wrote:

A #8 plane blade is just a wide plane blade- that's easy. you just need to make sure your stone is flat... but that is true whether you use a jig or not.
but having problems with your hands is another matter. in the case of sharpening a small, oddly shaped cutter like a hand router, it is sometimes easier to hold the cutter in a clamp, vise or purpose built jig and hold the sharpening stone in your hands. small diamond files can be very useful for this kind of thing.
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Its a wide, thin blade that is long and heavy and wobbly when held by hand. I can hand sharpen a chisel or block plane blade all day long and get good results. I can do the blade in my #604 smoother. But I have a lot of trouble finding the bevel on the #8 and then holding it steady. I got the new Veritas II honing jig and its a piece of cake to sharpen now.
Bob
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On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 10:30:18 GMT, the opaque Glen

Construct a jig to hold it firmly, referenced to the table the ScarySharp(tm) paper/diamond hone is on. That could be something as simple as a raised honing surface and a 4" or 6" wood clamp holding the iron on the table below, angled correctly, though this would take at least 4 hands to set up. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumberi86
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Sounds smart, I'll give it a try.
Thanks, Glen
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