sharp chisels... too sharp :(

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Stupid, stupid me... just got my chisels to where I could count my nosehairs in the back and bevel, and was screwing around with squaring the corners in a practice mortise for bed hardware... and was being stupid, didnt have the piece in a vise, and the chisel slipped and went THROUGH the pad of my thumb... owowow. I ran to the kitchen and wrapped it in paper towels, and was searching for some tape and I blacked out and fell... woke up probably seconds later from weird dreams wondering where the hell I was...
fun night, lessons learned
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Chisels collect more blood than the Red Cross, ask any woodworker.
Greg
"tmbg" wrote in message ...

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Groggy wrote:

And it ain't just the obvious scary sharp edge that can get you!
Two examples of less than obvious dangers - BOTH with a Wilson beefy mortising chisel (the ones Steve Knight use to carry)
1. Initial mortise cut - left hand holding the chisel down at the cutting end - Right On The Line - thumb and middle finger touching the stock, right hand swinging the nice big wood mallet. First blow drove the chisel into the wood - pinching my flesh - between the intersection of the bevel face and the side face of the chisel and the wood. That bevel face/side face edge is nice and square AND sharp. It does cut - wood, and flesh. It's supposed to cut wood - contrary to those who bevel the edges of their mortising chisels. It's not supposed to cut flesh.
2. Chopping down approaching the bottom of the tenon - drove the chisel in and it stuck. Tug - nothing. Yank - nothing. Foot on the board, both hands grabbing the chisel handle white knuckled, biceps, triceps, latissumus dorsi contracting - chisel pulls out finally - accelerating - as its handle approached - my chin. There's a point on the chin, referred to in boxing as "the button", which, when struck, will cause the strikee to literally see stars. This one hit hard enough to see several galaxies. Were it not for the padding of my beard it would probably have been a knock out blow - right on the button.
So many sharp edges - such a limited amount of blood - relatively speaking.
charlie b
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scribbled:

My only woodworking scar is 1" long on the pad of my thumb (i.e., the fleshy part on the hand). From a dull chisel though. I was trying carve a piece of wood that I was holding in my hand, 14 years old at the time. Dumb.
Luigi Note the new email address. Please adjust your krillfiles (tmAD) accordingly Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

I can only think of two woodworking scars. I acquired both of them last year.
One is on my left ring finger, the segment of the finger where the wedding ring lives. I poked a freshly-sharpened 1/4" chisel into that, spawning the "we look like chicken inside" thread. That one scarred, but not much.
The other, the middle segment of my left index finger has a diagonal scar. Looking at the palm side, divide the finger into quarters from palm to fingertip. The scar runs from the leftmost quarter all the way around to the middle of the back side of the finger. I did that one *guillotining* a backsaw into my finger when I slipped while showing my son how to cut a M&T joint. The work slipped in the vise, and the saw swung down in an arc, catching my off hand as it hung innoncently at my side. That one scarred big. I still haven't figure out how the hell I managed to do that to myself. I guess next time I'll have to put my off hand behind my back.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Thankfullly I have never(yet) cut myself with a chisel due in large measure to my first woodworking instructor who, upon noticing someone praticing poor technique, remarked: "Remember, if that chisel slips it's probably not stopping until it hits bone!!" A particulalry vivid picture and safety reminder.
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That's all too true... fortunately my chisel stopped when it hit the table, unfortunately there was an inch of muscle in between...
got my tetanus booster this morning. Nurse said I may or may not regain feeling in the end of my thumb.
On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 18:07:24 -0600, jev wrote:

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tmbg wrote:

Have heart. The finger I nailed with that backsaw was numb for a long time, but the feeling has gradually come back. You might indeed regain some or all of the feeling in that thumb.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 11:17:44 -0500, Silvan

Yup, I remember washing off enough blood in the sink to see the meat. White meat it was.

En garde! Fencing against the dreaded tenon using a scie dos. Sorry, that's the image that immediately came to mind when I read the last line of your riposte. :-)
Luigi Note the new email address. Please adjust your krillfiles (tmAD) accordingly Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address
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I dropped a freshly sharpened 1/4" chisel. It was on its way to hitting point first on the concrete floor. But I was fast and I reacted without thinking (obviously). I quickly raised my leg up and stopped it with my thigh. And it only went in about an inch.
Preston

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sharpening a kitchen knife once... got it nice and sharp... shifting hands, dropped it. automatically grabbed for the handle... missed. took the edge in the web between forefinger and thumb. heavy, quality 12" chef's knife. cut deep....
On Mon, 02 Feb 2004 18:06:10 GMT, "Preston Andreas"

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At least you did it to yourself. When our firstborn was a wee tyke we used to put her in her baby seat on the end of the kitchen counter while we prepared meals (it was a large kitchen and well away from the stove or sink). Once I turned around and caught her daintily inspecting a (sharp) paring knife. I jumped reflexively, grabbed the knife by the handle and quickly drew the dangerous object away from our precious one, leaving a nasty gash across her palm and a look of disbelief on her face. SWMBO almost forgave me until about a week later when her hand hand swelled up with an infection and her fever peaked at 104! Took a while to put THAT one behind us.

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Atta boy!!! Saved that edge!!! Way to go!!!
On Mon, 02 Feb 2004 18:06:10 GMT, "Preston Andreas"

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Preston Andreas writes:

Ouch. I learned about quick, unthinking reflexes at Parris Island. Dropped my razor while shaving one morning. Caught it, and laid the palm of my hand open for a couple inches. Not deep, but painful. Went from there to a couple days pugil stick practice, where I got my right thumb dislocated (popped right back in with the assistance of a drill instructor who liked seeing the boots' eyes widen) trying to avoid getting that hand hit. The next day, we had hand-to-hand-combat training. Next several days, in fact.
I've never forgotten, of course, and even my reflexes remembered.
Charlie Self "All you need in this life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure." Mark Twain http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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This reminds me of a story Jesse Ventura told on one of the talk shows...Letterman I think. He was in one of those instensive Navy SEAL training ordeals that last something like 3 straight days with no sleep.
Anyways, the day's training caused everyone to have blisters on their thumbs. The drill instructor had everyone line up and asked them if anyone had blisters. No one raised their hands, but like an "idiot" (his words) Jesse Ventura raised his. The instructor called him to the front and asked which hand had the blister. "Both", Ventura said. The instructor then asked him if he was right or left handed. I think Ventura said right-handed. The instructor then ordered him to rip off the blister on his left thumb with his right hand. Ventura, in agonizing pain did it. The insturctor asked him if it hurt. Ventura said no. Then, the instructor ordered him to now rip off the blister on his right thumb with his left hand. Ventura painfully did that. The instructor told him to get back in line and asked the rest of the group if they had blisters. Needless to say no one said a thing.
Okay, this story had nothing to do with dropping a razor....
Layne
On 02 Feb 2004 19:05:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

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That reminds me of some old Army electronics instructor saying if you drop your soldering iron, don't try to catch it..some did and a lesson was learned.
Philski
Preston Andreas wrote:

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Do NOT hold your soldering iron up in front of your nose to see if it is hot yet - DAMHIKT.
Jerry
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Super glue! On a somewhat related subject, I wouldn't recommend it for a deep cut though.
I have perfected my sharpening of carving gouges to the point that razors hide their heads in shame. As a result I also find myself bleeding from all sorts of places getting them to and from the tool rolls.
Seems like it's always in a painful slow to heal place. So, having gobs of CA for my model planes, I started gluing myself back together again, so to speak.
Asked my doctor if this was sane and he said sure, or you can spend ten times as much and buy the same thing from a rock climbers supply store.
m

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Lesson #2 Keep first aid stuff AT HAND in the shop.
I try to never be more than a few steps from a first aid kit...and I have several of them spread out though the house and garages.
Lesson #3 Carry a phone WITH you in the shop. SWMBO may or may not be able to hear you yell.
My dad went to the basement a few days ago...very hard of hearing and uses oxygen, but he was just going to be puttering around. A pipe clamp fell and caught him on the thumb and index finger of the right hand. Lost a lot of blood that he can not afford to lose and my mom wasn't due home for 3 hours. Thankfully, mom got off work early and was able to call 911.
Dad's going to be OK and he now carries a phone with him that has my cell phone number programed in. If I get a call from their house and no one says anything, I can be there in 5 minutes.
Now I just need to hope that I never get that call.
Luck
Mike
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Well, at least you only hurt your thumb. I shudder to think what could have happened while you were counting nose hairs :^)
JK
tmbg wrote:

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