Sharing photos from lighting experiment

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I have the results from the lighting configuration test some of us discussed some 6 months ago. Maybe my procedure is more interesting to see than the results.
I got a camera this week too (finally). My photo's have nothing on Swingman's...but maybe that helps make them interesting? : )
At least I'm providing proof that I followed through with what I said I planned to do. You can view some of the details on my web site if you want. All in all, it was sort of fun--it was just too darn hot this week to be completely fun!
http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
Bill
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"Bill" wrote ...

look much nicer. '-)
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Lee Michaels wrote:

It will be easier too. It became obvious they are designed to be hung in basically one way--and not in a temporary-adhoc way. It took me several hours to identify a decent way to hang them. One piece of 3/8" nylon rope, with a knot at each end, held them up, so I used two because all of the edges were sharp. 3 staples on top, for each piece of rope, kept them from slipping. I'm glad "the experiment" is over!
I'm looking forward to doing the proper installation. I picked up a conduit bender for $5 at an auction. It's almost time to start practicing those 15 degree bends at the ends (yes, I know they sell "adapters" which eliminate the need).
Bill
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wrote:

You'll want to paint that entire room -before- testing lighting, Bill. Eggshell paint is semi-reflective, but it doesn't glare like semi and full gloss paints do. It will make quite a difference, guaranteed.
I still think 11 fixtures will be too bright for you. (Have your wife take a picture once you get it done. I want to see if you're wearing shades in there. ;)
-- Win first, Fight later.
--martial principle of the Samurai
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Hi Larry,
I think I have enough lumens to go with the flat paint. One can always repent. One can always remove a bulb too, or take down a fixture. Admittedly, at this point the four fixtures near the garage door are superfluous, but they make the lighting "uniform" (some y'all place great stock in that).
The experiment revealed that 2 lights placed at 90" centers do not make lighting suitable for "seeing the line" with a power tool. You'd prefer lights at 43" centers, instead of 90", over your table saw. I suspect I'll be using exactly 2 fixtures more than half of the time.
At this point I have the 11 (T8) light fixtures designed in the pattern over the 20' x 24' space (lights running the long way:
++ __ __
__ __ __
++ __ __
__ __
the hole occuring where the attic is, and the fixtures marked ++ being my primary ones over my bench, and they are on 1 switch and the other 9 are on another switch. The 3 fixtures above the "gap" above will be right above the table saw. The EMT runs very nicely in the configuration above without a single bend and there is some symmetry. Larry, What would you change? Seriously. : )
BTW, having all of the lights on Would be too much for me if I was just passing the time. If I was running any major power tool, it might be good. I appreciate that this might be averaged out some.
Gosh, you'd think we hadn't done the experiment! : ) I do see your point though so I'm still listening. You might recall that I do already have two other lights from a separate circuit--and along with the ones marked ** above, those 4 DO provide a Nice medium level lighting in the most used area. So which fixtures are expendable? I marked in the other existing lights (on the separate circuit) in the diagram below.
++ __ __
__ __ | __
++ __ | __
__ __
I apologize to anyone who thinks I'm sounding like a broken record. I'm still willing to accept constructive criticism. At least now I know what to expect from 2 or 3 of my bulbs, etc.
BTW, did you all get the word about Menards having 11% off everything this week until August 7th (via rebate). I'm going to pick up most of my wire today and some of the other things I need for this project. I only bought 3 fixtures so far, but they came from Home Depot who hasn't offered a sale on them yet--and I don't know exactly how many I'll need. ; )
Bill
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On 8/3/2011 3:32 AM, Bill wrote:

FWIW I don't think you can see the difference between using flat and gloss white paint. I just lit up my new 3 car garage with lamps and painted most of the garage gloss white.
BUT the gloss paint tends to be easier to wipe down with out stains soaking in or hand prints being left behind. And dust tends to not be quite as attracted to a gloss surface. Flat paints tend to be dirt magnets.
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@swbelldotnet says...

Big downside on gloss is that it will show _every_ imperfection in the finish work. If your finish _is_ perfect then it can be a way of bragging. From a lighting viewpoint flat is better--the actual reflectance is about the same but it gives a more even light. Gloss vs flat doesn't always work the way you think.
And ease of cleaning is really more a function of the paint chemistry than gloss or flat.
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wrote:

Leon, if you have sunlight in your shop at any time, you'll see why gloss is such a bummer. Glare galore! Eggshell is the happy medium. It's _very_ washable, doesn't collect dust, and doesn't glare.
-- Win first, Fight later.
--martial principle of the Samurai
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On 8/3/2011 11:03 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

SORRY! Let me correct that to, I have "Satin" that gets sun light and no glare but does have more reflection than an egg shell or flat.
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Leon wrote:

As someone who is choosing, I'm curious whether you would you chose Satin again?
Bill
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On 8/3/2011 12:01 PM, Bill wrote:

Absolutely, I am very happy with the sheen and color, and that it is still clean in a 7 month old shop that has been creating lots of saw dust. Actually the color by a normal persons standards is white, the color chip says Swedish Coffee?
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wrote:

Wait just a darned minute here. You're saying that you, a Festool user, have a shop which is full of sawdust? WTF,O?
Does Not Compute.
-- In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer. -- Albert Camus
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On 8/4/2011 12:29 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Your scanner must have a Yuppie interface, painted wall still clean.
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wrote:

Oops! Non-yuppie brainfart, but you led me on with the "creating lots of saw dust" statement, too. I accept only 1/2 the guilt.
-- In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer. -- Albert Camus
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wrote:

Bueno, bwana. Most eggshells and satins have nearly identical sheen, but a few companies make them different.
-- In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer. -- Albert Camus
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Leon wrote:

THAT was what I learned on my trip to Mennards this morning. I didn't realize how clueless I was about paint. I learned there are 4 kinds:
flat, eggshell, satin and semigloss.
I learned that these are progressively easier to wipe dirt off of, and that, in the same order, they progressively reveal your drywall deficiencies, if you happen to have any.
Based on our conversation, I thought satin was a good choice. What are your opinions?
Bill
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On 8/3/2011 11:10 AM, Bill wrote:

Actually Bill I did use Satin, I typically think in terms of flat and gloss. I for got about all the in betweens.
Satin is what I have, it has just a touch of shine to it and I am happy with it.
One other thing to keep in mind. You wan to use a PREMIUM paint, especially if you are using a latex paint. Not all latex paints are created equally and that goes for premium brands also. As Swingman pointed out to me a few days ago the cheaper quality latex paints remain sticky. The better latex paints dry harder. So if you lean any boards against the wall you don't want them to stick. DAMHIKT.
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Leon wrote:

The brand of paint Mennards was leaning me towards was "Dutch Boy". How does that rate? It was regularly $25/gal on sale for $20/gal. I just bought some primer today.
Bill
BTW, You are quite correct: If I lean boards against the wall, I don't want them to stick!
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On 8/3/2011 12:09 PM, Bill wrote:

I have never used Dutch Boy however let me restate, Dutch Boy, Glidden, Sherwin Williams, Prat & Lambert are all top brand paints. Don't buy their cheapest paint. Regardless of whet "top" brand you buy, you want their best paint. Keep in mind that while you may think that you may never need the "higher" quality paint for your shop or garage the higher quality paints tend to go on the wall much better and with much less effort from you aside from the performance you get out of the paint years down the road.
Price never indicates the quality for sure but I once painted a kitchen for a customer, including the inside of her pantry. I had installed new cabinet door and drawer fronts and drawers and painted the insides of the cabinets too. I used "1" gallon of Pratt & Lambert Alkaid based oil enamel and coverage was great. IIRC 10 years ago I paid about $50 per gallon, but it only took one gallon and one coat.
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wrote:

Truth! But it's a truth I've yet to convince customers on. (I'm just glad I don't do much painting.)

One-coat alkyd? Amazing. What color? Over a white base, or did you tint the primer? I've gotta start doing that.
Our local home improvement store is now selling P&L. I'll have to give it a try next time. One client is sold on Miller AcryLite exterior house paint, and I now love it after using some on his rental unit.
Back to Bill: PAINT THE SHOP PURE WHITE. NO TINTS, NO COLOR. OK?
-- In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer. -- Albert Camus
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