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<nega-snip of quoted text>

I think the word you are looking for is "snip" ;-)
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I think the word you are looking for is "mega" ;)
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wrote in message

ooops!
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Snip

When I was in the Army, we had a recruit point an SLR at the Instructor saying "It's jammed I think Sarg". Well I think he got the "Sarg" bit out just before the barrel was pushed to one side and a bunch of fives caught him on the chin. He sure learnt a lesson and the rest of us watching did to.
Sometimes Words just ain't enough :)
regards John
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John B wrote:

When I was taking a CCW class, one of the participants, not paying attention to the muzzle, pointed a loaded pistol at the instructor. The instructor very politely asked him for the gun, asked him to leave, and then told the rest of us that that guy was not going to get his CCW, not now, not _ever_.
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To get a CCP? I'm not a gun guy. In any case, the instructor might well have been using this as a perfect opportunity to drive home the point to every other member in the class. IOW, if that guy had been the sole student, he would have merely gotten a severe talking-to.
Perfectly valid technique. Could well have staved off some serious injuries or deaths over his lifetime as an instructor. Good for him. I'm thinking the seargent's knuckle approach was a little better. I'm wondering if OSHA would allow that for pointing nailguns around, like some of the lesser thinking construction hacks have been known to do from time to time. (Or so I'm told).
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Mine is a table saw kick-back story. I had removed the blade guard since I was cutting a lot of dadoes (I know, I know, but Norm does it!). Turns out the fence was slightly out of alignment with the blade, and a piece of plywood I was cutting bound up on the back of the blade. The blade lifted the plywood and the top of the blade caught it and hurled it at my stomach. Ripped a perfectly good plaid shirt, and raised several lumps, though no breaks in the skin. The plywood was all dinged up afterwards too.
Moral of the story. Check the alignment of the rip fence with the blade weekly. Use a ruler, and align with the same tooth at the front and at the back.
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If I start working in the shop at 10:00 AM (after my pain meds kick in) I can go for up to three hours and still able to do accurate work, but by 1:30 to 3PM i'm starting to make mistakes and I know it's time to quit for the day.
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I've trained myself to detect when I'm about to apply (and believe) the logic that says "just one more and then I'll go to bed" means "it's the last one and therefore it can't hurt me".
This applies to motorcycling, sawing, climbing the ladder, etc., etc...
I've heard that professional skiers watch for this reasoning as well.
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I've seem most of the ones listed but there is one I didn't notice.
I was death on my men laying a Skil saw down on the guard. To start with, you can spring the guard that way but I once saw a man lay it down on the guard and the guard was stuck UP. It came right across the top of his shoe. He was lucky that the blade was stopping and it didn't get through the shoe.
"Thomas G. Marshall"
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I always do that, and always feel funny about it.
The guys who built my deck had removed all the blade guards, because apparently they felt they got in the way. So they were regularly flipping them upside-down on the deck, spinning teeth free to hit anything.
Also, not one eye goggle. Not one mask (the holding structure was PT).
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You lay it on it's side. Re: of course to the mod 77.
"Thomas G. Marshall"
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snipped-for-privacy@replacetextwithnumber.hotmail.com says...

Ah, Real Manly Men.
In this country you can see them standing in a field, next to their tractor with a big spraytank, putting poison on their pastures clad in nothing but ankle high boots, shorts and a sleeveless undershirt; hat is optionial.
Of course you find them on our building sites as well, but since our OSH has started to come down on the employers Really Hard, most cowboys find they have to buck up or butt out. Those guys of yours would mend their ways or find themselves to be unemployable here pretty smartly.
-P.
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I've got three - all the results of flat out ignorance.
The first involved a bandsaw - and a bandsaw blade with what I NOW know was a bad weld. Though I'd heard the tic-tic-tic of the bad weld as it passed the blade guides, I lacked the knowledge to interpret what that sound meant. When the band's weld failed the resulting noise as it accordianed into the blade quard stopped my ability to breath and I think it stopped my heart - for several moments. The thought of what would've happened if the broken band hadn't been constrained in the blade guard causes shudders.
The second involved a 12" sliding compound miter saw. I had a piece of wood about 8" wide and maybe 6" long. I needed it to be a 6" square. I hadn't acquired a table saw yet and couldn't figure out how to hold the stock so I could rip it to the desired width with a handheld circular saw. SO - I pressed the 8" width against the SCMS fence, and holding it "firmly" with my left hand, tried to cut 2" of the width of the part. BIG Mistake! A "moments diagram" would have shown me that the force I was applying with my left hand 4" from the fulcrum of an 6 inch lever and the force applied by a 1 hp, 12" diameter circular saw turning at maybe 6-8000 rpms at 2" from the fulcrum (2" of the part was passed the SCMS's fence) was no where near the same. The saw won, I somehow didn't break my thumb, or fingers, or wrist - and I miraculously was not struck by either flying piece of wood - nor did any part of me contact any of the spinning pieces of sharp carbide. The memory of that really stupid move causes both a shudder AND rates up there as a 9 on The Pucker Scale.
The third easily avoidable Dumb Move involved a tight mortise and tenon joint. A blow to the head can actually cause you to see stars.
http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/OOPS/OOPS1.html
Woodworkers Central has an Accident Survey page worth exploring http://www.woodworking2.org/AccidentSurvey/search.htm
And here's some stuff I put together on "kickback" which may save someone some grief
http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/KickBack/KickBack1.html
charlie b
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wrote:

I laughed when I read that one...
A few years ago I was getting into my truck, a good climb up. Winter, lot's of ice, and my legs shot out from under me, and went under the truck, and down I went, seemingly head first.
My head hit the ice, and I *heard* the most incredible 'boing' sound ever. I never knew the skull was resonate until that day, but you saw stars--I heard bells ringing.
Funny thing was that I didn't even get a headache, but it sure scared the living daylights out of me--I figured I'd fractured my skull. <bg> I'm now much more careful about getting in and out of the truck too.
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My most scary accident invloved TS kickback. I have a small shop, and to rip anything over about 16" long I have to open the garage door (an aluminum roll-up). I was working late, and went to trim a square piece of 3/4" plywood that was about 14 X 16 inches. What I hadn't accounted for was the vertical aluminum channel on the garage door, which the plywood encounted, stopping the cut. Next thing I knew, the plywood was gone, and my hands were holding air over my TS. The blade had thown the board back at me spinning like a Frisbee, hitting me in the stomach and side. Luckily, the spin was sympathetic, so it rolled off me and continued into a stack of plastic totes, totally demolishing them. A bruise on my belly, and a wake up call.
-Zz
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Mine involves 3 seperate incidents. Did I learn from them, yes and no.
The first is when I was using a RAS to rip some wood. I know, I know shouldn't have done it, but it was that or a hand saw. Anyways, the wood I was ripping grabbed and sucked my finger in with it. It left a nice little dent in my right index finger that the ER could only clean up. Leason learned: Don't use the RAS to rip lumber.
The next one comes from the "why kids shouldn't be allowed in the shop unless they have warning lights and 120db sirens on" department. One nice winter afternoon, I was tuning up my jointer. I had just finished setting blade height and decided to run a test piece through. I didn't hear the door open when my daughter decided to come in. I started the jointer and began to run the piece through when I hear a big loud "BOO". Startled, My hand tries to reach for the on off switch but instead comes in contact with the spining blades. I get it shut off and look at my finger expecting to see it mangled. I was surprised that I didn't even have a scratch. Leason learned: Lock the doors while using power tools.
The last is from the "you should practice with the machine off" department. I finally got a new table saw. I spent the better part of the day putting it together and came time for the first cut. I practiced using the miter guage and sliding it because the table was shorter than what I was used to. I turned the saw on and instead of doing it the way I practiced, I decided to freehand it. Well I lost the hand position to blade spatial relationship and I felt the nick in my finger. Needless to say I knew there wasn't anything the ER could do. Took 2 weeks before I used the TS again. Leason learned: Alcohol, power tools, and a late night don't mix.
Allen
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says...

Sounds like you were ripping the wrong direction, maybe? My RAS spits things out when I rip, and doesn't suck them in. Just as important to have the fence parallel to the blade as on a table saw, using a very robust 'featherboard' I find ripping on the RAS to be extremely unpleasant due to lots of detritus in the face, but never had a problem. Generally I use the bandsaw for ripping, but I've had to do some weathergrooves in vertical cladding and did that on the RAS.
What I have had a problem with was the RAS chucking stuff when crosscutting wet timber. In the days before drop saws were readily available I used my RAS on a couple of building sites. Had two or three 4x2 offcuts flung 10-30 metres across the paddock (out the back of the saw). Just as well nobody but me on the site. Same in my workshop once: 'Whoomp' into the wall behind the saw.
The other day I had another RAS incident. I was checking out a shoulder for a joint on a board, and I had the board standing on edge against the fence on the RAS. The saw grabbed the board and sucked it between saw and fence (in other words, the fence was too low for the job, less than half the height of the board I was cutting. Nothing got close to my body or extremities, but the board was shattered needless to say. Lesson learned.
The last one is close to your 'kids' one, and shows that this should also apply to (certain) parents. I was working on the bandsaw one day when my father walked in, grabbed a piece of timber and, slapstick fashion, turned around with it and hit me in the elbow from behind. The bandsaw blade went through my thumbnail but did not quite nick the skin. I felt it though. Phew. I am not sure he even saw I was there, he's that non-perceptive and narrow focussed. Close call, indeed. Well, both my parents are people who have never been around powertools and have no sense of self-preservation at all. When they get within 15' of me working the chainsaw I now turn it off and stand and wait. They're in their 80ies, and sadly not the most sensible people any more. (The above incident happened around 15 years ago, mind).
But in general I have become very very leery of having people walk behind my back when I am wielding anything sharp edged or using powertools since. I even stop cutting bread when my wife crosses behind my back, which she just can't understand the why of ;-)
-Peter
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While helping rebuild a porch, using a palm nailer, my dad pulled a good one, I had been using it a bit so I kinda had it figured out, BTW the palm nailer is a great little tool in tight spaces, and uses common nails, told my dad how to use it, told him to place the nail into the snout of the nailer and then press the nail where you want to nail it and push in on the nailer, guess age is catching up with his hearing, or he condensed it to push the nail into the nailer, anyway, next thing I hear, the palm nailer went off, I turn back, he is looking at it like, "what happend" he pushed the nail into the barrel a bit too hard and it fired the nail out of it, good thing he was pointing it away from him at the time, we never found that nail, got the porch done with no more runaway nails.
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a
other's
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On Aug 9, 1:57 pm, "Thomas G. Marshall"

I was using a can of spray paint and didn't point it in the right direction...you can guess the rest.
THis was when was about 20. I've used eye protection when painting ever since.
---------------------------------- www.tawny-kitaen.com www.flavor-flav.tk www.basement-flooded.com
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