Shapton Stones, Yep, they work

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Mark & Juanita wrote:

It would work, but only if you give the abrasive something to bite into so it can scrape the blade. I believe fixing a mylar sheet to the glass would do it, and strewing the grit over that. Can't remember where I heard that one, though.
I thought you meant a hard rub of the edge against the glass to get a burnishing effect.
er
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Enoch Root wrote:

I have a water stone pond that I bought used. Has the glass cover with the mylar, came with the grit - haven't tried it out yet. The grit seems pretty coarse to be meant for the final honing. I thought it was for lapping.
R
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wrote:

... snip

Actually, I was asking whether either method would have any benefit. Probably little burnishing impact from the flat glass itself, a grit of some sort would be required. I think some of those honing crayons might have enough stick to adhere to the glass. I might give that a try just for grins.

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F or many years, my standard practice has been to use a honing jig (eg the 'General' pattern whose roller runs on the bench top.
I hone on a fine diamond plate and move onto a strip of glass set 3mm lower than the plate and charged with Autosol chrome cleaner cream.
This forms a narrow polished micro-bevel at a very slightly increased sharpening angle.
For a shop-made honing jig for plane irons, maybe a look at my web site - Sharpening Notes - A Honing Jig for Plane irons would be worth while.
Jeff G
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Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
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wrote:

Thanks for the link reminder Jeff. Seeing the jig, I now understand the "3 mm lower than the plate" comment. Do you have any issues with wearing out the glass?
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There appears to be no noticable wear, though the gloss has gone from the surface.
Jeff G
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Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
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wrote:
<<<<<<<<<<<SNIP >>>>>>>>>>>>
. Anyone out there do

Take a long look at http://www3.telus.net/BrentBeach /
He has done microscopic examinations and pictures of many plane blades after various types of sharpening operations and subsequent use. He has a full section and pictures on the effects of using leather strops with and without honing compound.
You can learn a lot from his work.
Regards.
Tom
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Tom Banes wrote:

Great link!
Thanks!
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Tom wrote: >Take a long look at >http://www3.telus.net/BrentBeach / > >He has done microscopic examinations and pictures of many plane blades >after various types of sharpening operations and subsequent use. He >has a full section and pictures on the effects of using leather strops >with and without honing compound. > >You can learn a lot from his work. > >Regards. > >Tom
Thanks Tom, bookmarked it.
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stropping tends to dub the edge a bit it is fast but usualy does not not give as sharp of a edge. the shine is only visual.
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Steve knight wrote:

[mentally]:
Marks "genuine horse butt" off his wishlist.
Darn.
er
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Then you don't know how.

sells
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CW wrote:

Some electromicrographs in Leonard Lee's book indicate the stropped edge has a smoother character (than 8k waterstone alone). And I can imagine a periodic brush across the leather will straighten any tendency to hook. But the angle is funny on those pics (coming at the edge from down the bevel instead of the side or on top... no gold plating for the pic either, because they're sequential shots, so lots of glare) and it's hard to say whether it's sharper, or just nicely buffed.

er
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

IME, those are good grits, for waterstones, but for coarser stuff I'd (had I to do it over again), for better wear resistance, consider the diamond stones.
In addition, for narrow blades (smaller chisels, etc.) I think you're better off with the diamond stones (or oilstones) because using the waterstones to sharpen them will cause uneven wear of the stones.
For the 8000x stone (at least my Norton) it doesn't seem to be much of a problem.
Lapping a waterstone is a miserable experience. Not because it's difficult, but because you are removing a lot of material from an expensive stone.
Now, enjoy the cramps in your forearms as you treat all the blades in your shop. :)
er
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Enoch Root wrote:

I read somewhere (can't remember where now) that japanese blades don't do well with coarse diamond stones. Apparently the harder steel tends to get microfractures from the coarse diamonds, and this then leads them to chip more easily later on.
I wish I could remember where I saw this.
Chris
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wrote:

I've got some DMT stones, so for the course cuts, I'll still be using those to prep for the Shaptons.
... snip

:-)

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recommends for woodworking tools (1000, 5000, and 8000 grits). I've been

diamond stones wear fast cutting steel. the tips wear off then they are as slow as dirt.

depends on the stones.

only with cheap stones. I have not worn out any of my shaptons in 1500 or so blades. I used to wear out a norton in a month or so.
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Steve knight wrote:

Those are just the ones I'm thinking of. And experiencing. Maybe I'll take a look at the coarse Shapton, soon. Thanks. :)
er
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

I've used them in school.
They're super stones, but I'm moving to them as I wear out my Norton stones. Shapton stones proved their worth to me in actual use, they're worth the price.
Barry
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I'm curious; can any sharpening experts in this group compare the Shapton stones to the Spyderco Ceramics?
The Spyderco stones come in Medium (600), Fine (1800) and Ultra Fine (2000). But, I'm not sure which of the grit numbering formats is used by Spyderco. (or Shapton)
I got the Spydercos from Highland Hardware a number of years ago. I've used them dry and clean them periodically with scouring cleanser.
One web site, (http://www.fandfwoodcarving.com/sharpstone.htm ) has the Spyderco stones for $140.00 for a set of the three grits, 2 x 8 inch.
Jack
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| | Woodcraft has 15% off on Shapton stones, at least the ones that Shapton | recommends for woodworking tools (1000, 5000, and 8000 grits). I've been | using scary-sharp but not getting that have the "hair fall off your arm in | front of the blade" sharpness that I've been looking for. Since I've been | trying more and more to avoid the use of sandpaper on my projects and to | use planes and scrapers as exclusively as possible (I'm finding that this | is actually faster than sanding since one doesn't have to progress through | grits), I used this as the justification to pull the trigger and try the | Shapton system. Got the stones home and unpacked and pulled out the blade | on the #4 smoothing plane. In the process of going through the first | stone, my hand slipped and the blade contacted my left thumb -- yep, even | at the first grit, it's sharper than anything I've gotten thus far. [Dang, | that smarts! -- it took quite a deep cut into the corner of the thumb] | | After getting the bleeding under control and some bandaids on it (I | figured that the ER would just butterfly it shut anyway and charge me $200 | for the privilege of sitting around bleeding for 2 or 3 hours), I | progressed through the 5000 and 8000 grit stones. While the finished | sharpening doesn't have the mirror surface I was getting with scary-sharp, | I can honestly say that I have never had scary-sharp provide the sharpness | that this does -- the blade shaved forearm hair with no effort and was | producing very fine shavings in ash that was quite course-grained. | | With a couple of process changes for safety, I'm a happy camper. I'll | have to get the lapping system in the future. Even for the price, I'm | still in it for less than I would have paid for a Tormek or other electric | system. | | | | | | +------------------------------------------------------ --------------------------+ | | If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough | | +------------------------------------------------------ --------------------------+
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