Shapton Stones - Pricing $$$$$

So Shapton Stones are the best out there - on that I guess we can all agree. Given that, why is it that the Hippo series stones cost over twice as much per square inch of abrasive as the Professional series?
Is it that much more difficult to make a stone that's 3.94" wide versus one that's only 2.76" in width? It's also an inch and change longer, but at 5x the cost it just doesn't make sense. How many blades of 2.76" and greater are there out there?
JP **************************** And where are the deals?
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Isn't it a lot thicker?
-j

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Jay,
I don't know the difference in the actual stone but if you look at their web site
Pro stone 210 * 70 * 15 = 220.5 cc @ $53 for 1000 grit Hippo 250 * 100 * 20 = 500 cc @ $134 for 1000 grit (without base) They are about 11% more for the volume of stone you get.
(53/220)/(134/500)=1.11 ( 1.11 times as much per cc)
You got me curious so I had to look at it. Does anyone know if there is a difference in the stone composition?
Glen

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web
Considering that there is some minimum usable thickness (since when it gets to a certain thickness it will break - you would have to subtract from the usable volume of both) it seems like the price per sharpening is probably a wash.
-j
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If the breakpoint is at the same thickness for both, the Hippo should come closer in cost per usable stone than the above calculation suggests.
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Once the stone gets too thin, couldn't you mount it onto a base, much like how the king polishing stones are mounted onto plastic bases to begin with?
(I'd like to hear from people who do this what they use, as base and adhesive.)
J wrote:

it gets

from the

probably a

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On 4 Feb 2005 13:28:09 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net wrote:

Natural Japanese stones, sawn into few mm slices, and laid (unglued) on a springy wooden lath (mine is lime). Really thin sections get a coat of lacquer to hold them together. http://www.namikawa-ltd.co.jp/cgi-bin/item_e.cgi?cate=9&noG
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Smert' spamionam

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wrote:

Certainly, but you don't sharpen your chisels or planes with jizuya. Those are to give a polish to a sword. Also, I think that they are traditionally split from a stone and then flattened on stones, not sawn.
-j
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On 4 Feb 2005 13:28:09 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net wrote:

I have a set of hippo stones. they are the regular shapton stones not the pro formula. but wear wise they are so big they hardly wear at all. I think I have been using mine atleast two years will little sign of wear. that large surface is nice but I don't know if anyone really needs it.
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the hippo's are regular shapton stones not the pro stones. they are pretty thick though. I got them because everything else moved or rocked on me. I get pretty vigorous in sharpening (G)
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I've been pretty heavy into the microabrasive/granite surfacing plate (aka ScarySharp) technique for a while. I've been doing stones for coworkers for a couple of weeks, and when you do 3 or 4 at a time you can really fly. I start at 220 (or even 150) and work my way consecutively through 400, 600, 1000, 1500 and 2000 with relative ease. The biggest pain was the mess of the water and moving around the paper, but I put the block on a lazy susan and the whole thing in a shallow tub with a drain to a 5 gal. pail and it's a snap.
My going rate is one (1) six pack per chisel. Pabst for a quick touch-up, something more exotic (aka Duvel) for a full lapping, reshaping and microbevel.
That said, I'm ready for stones. Good stones. Good LARGE stones. With the surfacing plate (flat to .0001) and paper I can still see slight rounding at the edge after lapping. Not a big deal, but between that and abrasives costing a buck a sheet, I think I'd do better with a COMPLETE set of Shapton Pro series plus diamond lapping plate. YMMVC.
zhaypeek
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that's the problem with sandpaper it wears unevenly. I really had to learn how to lap plane soles the right way on it to get a good job. it always wears more in the middle so the outsides cut faster. one cheap way to lap them flat is to buy a diamond lap get a 8" one you can get them for around 40.00 and they are better then the DMT stuff. I may just have to buy anther one for my shapton's.
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