Sensitized to formaldehyde/need workbench

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Just Wondering wrote:

In honesty, I've seen that happen on MIL-SPEC clamps. They'd seen forty years of hard service and been through a couple of wars when it happened but . . .
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HeyBub wrote:

Two things--1: It bends. 2: The surface of the screw is bad enough that it can't be tightened properly.
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I've never had any trouble with a HF C-Clamp. However, I work with mainly pine and damage to the wood occurs before they reach their breaking points. Like all HF tools, you are their quality control, so be wary.
We had some extremely cheap ones that had a cap on the screw. The cap would often fall off and the mechanism was terrible. They actually gained value when thrown in the trash, cause now they're not worthless C- clamps, they're garbage!
These days, I usually reach for an Irwin Quick Grip. The C-clamps are good when I need more clamping pressure or want to drive something hard in. When all you've got is C-clamps, they'll put nails in...
Puckdropper
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reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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wrote:

Try one made in the USA. Then try one made in China. The one made in China slipped off my work and is a rough screw.
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...
Thanks Lew!
I didn't realize how valuable the suggestion above was when I first read it, but I visited WoodCraft today and I also was emailed come coupons from Harbor Freight today.
The price of a large bar clamp is about $40.00 at WC versus $4.99 on sale at HF, and I need a few more than several...
I'm not saying that they are the same exact product (at all), but HF makes buying a lot of bar clamps feasible for me.
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Well, there are bar clamps and then there are bar clamps. I bought a bunch at Lee Valley a year or so ago, and thought I'd scored an incredible deal. 12 24" clamps for $75. I don't regret buying them, but it wasn't near the deal I thought it was. Light gage aluminum and it's showing its age already because I bear down on them a bit too much.
Like many here, I'd recommend starting off with some pipe clamps at first. 12", 24" and 36" to start, with maybe a couple of 4' thrown in. If you're on a budget, that's an excellent way to begin the addiction of clamp buying.
The thing about pipe clamps is that small nuculear bombs won't damage them, and they suffer through a fair amount of abuse. They're heavy, and that's a bit of a disadvantage, but you'll never regret having them.
Tanus
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Your points are well taken. I was just thinking that it's too bad my new next door neighbor is not a woodworker, then we could share clamps, but, he is a plumber (and a nice guy too)! Maybe he knows where to get pipes? :) I can see I have a bit more homework to do.
My garage floor is badly stained too--from trans fluids, paint stains, and who knows what. And the previous owned did a lot of welding in the garage, so there is light "soot" around. Does anyone here know if I can hose down a stucco ceiling (with unpainted plastered walls), before I give it a paint job, or if should I just use a sponge and detergeant)? I've heard there are some good options painting the floor (epoxy-related)--I haven't learned yet how much prep they require.
Tanus, I haven't begun the addiction to clamp-buying yet, but the number of work bench tops and "shelves" I want to make increases the longer I think about design! And I expect for one set of clamps to suffice for the construction of all of them! :) I want my workshop to reflect my acquired respect for the crafts I am learning. People oft say the TS is the center of the workshop, but for me I think it's the workbench.
One quesiton that occurred to me is whether the glued Southern Yellow Pine is up to the task of supporting a machinist vise, with the pounding that goes along with it? I suppose it is, I just wanted to double check.
Sorry for so many questions.. BTW, I bought a 9" x 12" x 2" granite surface plate today (on sale from WoodCraft for $20). It's supposed to be accurate to .0001". It is satisfyingly Very Heavy. Maybe I'll store it in the base of my workbench for stability. Two or three more and one might regard a bench as immobile! :)
Cheers, Bill
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Bill | 2009-08-14 | 5:37:28 AM wrote:

If it's a real stucco coat, you can get it pretty wet without worry. If it's wallboard mud with sand in it that *looks* like stucco, you'll be depending on the paint to protect the mud. Most wallboard mud dissolves in water.

Yes, some of the floor products are good, but the good ones are very expensive, and the ones you buy at the big-box stores aren't the good ones. All of them need a good, clean surface to bond to, so you'll spend tons of time cleaning the concrete beforehand. You might even have to rent a concrete grinder. Before you make up your mind what to do, look at options like rubber tiles and roll coverings.
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Thank you, I certainly will! Bill
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Steve, thanks you for sharing your ideas. I just looked at some of these, and I started wondering how SAFE they are for a workshop. Should people be walking around a table saw or bandsaw on rubber tiles or roll coverings (I'm just playing devil's advocate)?
I am also not crazy about the idea of worrying that whether I drop a 2 by 4 on the floor might hurt my floor covering...
I"m not sure what I will do, but more than one person has suggested the "epoxy paint" technology to me. I will explore the options you mentioned.
Bill
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Bill | 2009-08-14 | 5:17:01 PM wrote:

Those are good questions. I've seen rubber/carpet mats in lots of factory settings for slip avoidance, and I've seen ads for "comfort" mats that look like heavy-duty foam rubber.
As an aside, I quoted a guy $750 to apply a Sherwin-Williams two-part epoxy garage floor paint (with sprinkles) to a new two-car garage. I didn't get the job, because he thought I was too high, but all the painters I talked to said I was too low. Even though it was a new floor, never been parked on, it would require chemical cleaning and power washing; then apply the paint (and sprinkles); then apply the clear sealer. At least three trips for me, and it could easily turn into two days or more if something about the floor was odd.
If you go with epoxy, don't scrimp on the cleaning. I've seen too many floors that peeled.
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I called a fellow (Indiana): $2000 to prep and surface my two car garage with something claimed to be 4 times as strong as epoxy. He said the prep (concrete grinder) is the expensive part when I said that I don't need to have it look like an auto showroom--that I mainly was interested that it be cleaned.
Since then, I learned that I can locally rent a big gas or electric concrete grinder for $95/day (I will call to find out if I should expect other expenses such as grinding disks).
A gallon of epoxy covering from Lowes is about $60 and is supposed to cover 250 square feet. My garage is 450 square feet, so I'll need two gallons. If this sort of product is only "good", then what other coverings might you recommend ? Epoxy "Paint" seems more desirable to me than rubber tiles or roll coverings.
Any thoughts welcome of course.
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

Cold day in hell when you can buy a gallon of epoxy for $60, closer to $100.
I don't know what those people are smoking, but it is good stuff.
There was an episode of This Old House a couple of years ago where they resurfaced a concrete garage floor.
All I can remember was it was a 2-3 day project and definitely not a one man job.
Cleansed, ground and etched the existing concrete first day followed by coating next day as I remember.
Maybe a Google may help.
Lew
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I guess this is what I was looking at the other day (or something very similar to it):
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId(8556-4-002.0051730.007
It might be adequate for my current needs. At this point, I just want to stand on and look at a clean floor rather than a very grimey one. I'm not planning to show it off on tv or anything. :)
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId(8556-4-002.0051730.007
Water based, one part epoxy, $27.88/gal.
Dream on.
If you think this is going to do your job, we should talk about some swamp land over in Arizona.<G>
Cleaning up and sealing a concrete slab is a lot of work and it won't be cheap.
IMHO, you have two choices, do it first class or stay at home.
There are no coach fares on this one.
Lew
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http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId(8556-4-002.0051730.007
This may interest you: - something I came across recently.
There is a forum at Garagejournal.com with a thread describing contributors experiences with Quikcrete epoxy kits from Lowes. Cost seems to be around $65 per kit to cover around 250 sq ft. Thread starter describes the whole process including floor grinding, with photo's. General consensus seems to be that it performs well.
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t3702
diggerop
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interest you: - something I came across recently.

Thank you for posting this, diggerop.
That must be what I found at Lowes site the other day because the price and the square footage is about the same. What do you think of the result, Lew (I don't have other results to compare it to, but I think it looks pretty good)?
Bill
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---------------------------------------------------- diggerop wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------- "Bill" wrote:

What is being described is a catalyzed resin system, which is what it should be if epoxy based.
I must admit, I'm prejudiced.
One look at that concrete grinder brought back memories of many years ago behind the business end of a floor sander while in college.
I swore I'd never do it again.
The secret of doing a coating like this will be the surface prep.
I'm sure that will include a muriatic acid etch followed by a neutralization wash.
As far as life is concerned, 8 months doesn't impress me.
A couple of years on a garage floor in the rust belt where salt laden snow drops off the car when you park it inside at night is a more realistic test IMHO.
I also painted my brand new garage floor subjected to conditions like that.
Lasted about a year.
When it comes to concrete coatings, I'm wary of any DIY process.
YMMV
Lew
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These guys must be on some sensational stuff : )
Aero Marine Products in San Diego 300/1 1 Gallon Kit - Total yield of 1 Gallon of epoxy Consists of 1/2 Gallon of #300 resin and 1/2 Gallon of #11 Hardener Price: $46 per kit
diggerop
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"diggerop" wrote:

$46 is for a gallon of casting resin(red)
Doesn't appear to package a gallon kit for laminating(green), but 1-1/2 gallon is $74 which is ($49+/gal) still pretty good for small quantity.
Lew
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