Semi-OT: Satisfied with your health care?

Page 4 of 5  
Mark & Juanita wrote:
<SNIP>

Glen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can they still own table saws? They need a weeks training before getting permission to buy a chain saw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No. They outlawed the sale of tablesaws with arbors long enough to mount a dado blade.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So, how far does that law extend? Can a Brit ship in a dado comparable tablesaw from another country? Can the motor in one of their table saws be changed out for a motor with an arbour long enough for a dado blade.
In other words, what possibilities exist for getting around the attack on dados?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With respect, Mark, I think it is very far fetched. First, the government is not close to taking over. The most aggressive serious proposal towards that is a government run health insurance program in competition with the private insurers. That is getting a lot of push back on the grounds that it would drive out the private insurers. Whether it would or not depends on the details, and we are a long way from details.
Second, there is already a large, government health care program (Medicare) where the government has not made a single move in 40 years towards banning any activity for recipients. Smokers are under a lot of pressure, but that is not just the government and there is no ban, nor does anyone I know think it would work.
What you suggest is certainly not impossible, but we are a long way from here to there.
-- Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Douglas Johnson wrote:

You make a good point. Inasmuch as some form of rationing is required, we need to look at the other effects of whatever scheme is being considered.
The current method of pay-to-play has, as a consequence, a built-in incentive to work, save, invest, be productive, and plan for contingencies. Only by pursuing these goals can one stand a good chance of choice in health care. It's social survival of the fittest. The dissolute and the slackers die off more quickly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If we really wanted to get serious about Darwinism, we'd eliminate health care entirely. -- Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you *Really* wanted to get serious about Darwinism, you'd eliminate all social programs, works programs, government and anything else that brings people together. The only industry would be club making.
But then, what would we do for beer?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/30/2009 7:12 PM scritch spake thus:

I'll keep this short too. I agree *absolutely*.
Will make more detailed arguments later.
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Oh, like some of the european countries where healthcare is "free" and everyone pays 80% income tax? And you may have NO choice of provider (any MD or hospital is considered as good as any other MD or hospital).
No thanks.
Please check ALL the conditions before picking out just the ones you think are good.
Did you know that a German driver's license can cost $1500 to $2500?
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is no such country
>And you may have NO choice of provider
There is no country where private health care is outlawed

ROFL
No, but I don't believe it.
Tim W
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim W wrote:

"Private insurance for medically necessary hospital and physician services is illegal in only 6 of the 10 [Canadian] provinces." http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/full/164/6/825
Most African countries do not permit private medical practice.

" it will cost approximately 1500 bucks...maybe less also..."
"I did mine about 2 years ago in Frankfurt. The whole thing cost about ?2,000."
"An Australian friend of mine got his German license 6 years ago and only paid around ? 500..." http://www.toytowngermany.com/lofi/index.php/t42662.html
"Many schools have set up simplified courses for experienced drivers, which will cost you about ?200 as opposed to the over ?1,000 that a beginner would have to pay." http://www.howtogermany.com/pages/driving.html
"This is understandable when you realize that a German driver's license costs about $1500-2000, after a minimum of 25-45 hours of professional instruction plus 12 hours of theory, and such a license is good for life." http://www.german-way.com/driving.html
and more...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Tim W
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"HeyBub" wrote:

Picture a fish hanging in the air on a hook frantically thrashing about in a futile attempt to throw the hook.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Read the damn article. It doesn't say what you're implying. If you want to pay a doctor out of your own pocket for services, you can.
From TFA:
"Before describing the constraints on direct billing and extra-billing, we want to clarify the concept of opting out. A Canadian physician may, at any time, choose to give up his or her rights to bill the public plan and take up practice in the private sector.
Although there are differences in terminology (e.g., "non-participation," "non-enrolment," "practising outside the Act," "not subject to the agreement"), every provincial plan permits physicians to opt out."
In Manitoba, Nova Scotia and Ontario the financial incentive to do so is significantly dulled because opted-out physicians cannot bill more than they would receive if they were working within the public plan.
In every other province, opted-out physicians can set their fees at any level. However, as the status disincentive row in Table 1 shows, all of the remaining 7 provinces except Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island have in place measures that prohibit the public purse from subsidizing the private sector. In other words, patients of opted-out physicians are not entitled to any public funds to subsidize the cost of buying their services privately.

A Citation is required for this statement.
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scott Lurndal wrote:

True. But, as the article states, private medical insurance is not allowed. Further, private physicians do not have privileges a government-run hospitals. This limits physicians to things like dermatology, ophthalmology, or primary care. Anything beyond that has to be cycled into the government system.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

Not necessarily...if they thought there was money in it someone could open a private hospital.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Friesen wrote:

They have, but they're all in the U.S.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

That's not so, private insurance exists in Canada but it can only pay for things not covered by the govt. insurance plans, e.g. private rooms, some rehab and so on, plus total coverage for people waiting to qualify for govt.-run insurance, e.g. recent immigrants. The 2005 ruling by the Supreme Court of Canada that prohibiting patients from going outside the govt.-run systems is unconstitutional while there are widespread life-threatening delays in diagnosis and treatment in the govt.-run systems is also worth noting--it makes the whole "not allowed" thing kind of doubtful.

Most hospitals in Canada are not "government-run," they are operated by non-profit charitable entities (although I'm sure they manage to absorb plenty of money without calling it profit).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
scritch wrote:

We need to collectively build a cross and nail to it everyone who makes off-topic posts to rec.woodworking concerning the desirability of this or that or the other political action.
<plonk>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.