selling a bandsaw to someone who doesn't do curves...

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I'm looking toward the future of my shop, and I have a 14" bandsaw on the list. I'm trying to sell it to myself. I'm looking at a 14", specifically, because I'm a little tired of buying the little one and then buying the big one two years later. Maybe I should even hold out for 16" or larger.
I'd like to do resawing, but then the only stock readily and conveniently available to me is all 4/4. That can be resawn, but the possibilities are limited.
I have occasion to make plane totes from time to time.
I could make bandsaw boxes.
It would make cutting up turning stock hella easier. This advantage is mitigated by the fact that I've already figured out I can't make much of any real interest to me on my mini sized lathe. A bandsaw would make it easier to cut up the logs I have, but then what? I still couldn't make anything particularly interesting.
What else are these things good for? I'm having trouble coming up with reasons to buy one, other than "everybody needs a bandsaw." I really don't do curvy stuff. I've had a scrollsaw for a year, and have only used it for any serious purpose once. I couldn't find any use for small curvy stuff, and don't see much use for big curvy stuff either. I have always liked straight lines, sharp angles, and geometric shapes, dating to way back before I ever tried dorking any wood.
I've about talked myself out of even keeping it on the someday list. At least until I have room for a real lathe, money to buy a real lathe, and a thousand bucks worth of lathe gadgetry.
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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While you're holding out, why not go all the way, and hold out for a 20"+ semi-antique? Something from pre-WWII, perhaps, or who knows? I bet the OWWM folks have an idea or three.

Think outside the sawmill.

Bow saw, or coping saw, or jigsaw. Not a reason to spend $500

Every one I've seen is embarassingly ugly. Maybe it's just not my thing.

A bowsaw, chain saw or other hand saw also works pretty well. Maybe better on green stock.

I bought one (Jet 16"bs) 18 months ago, and almost sold it last month. I would have, if the fellow had made me a real offer. I used it today for three cuts in some still really wet Liquidamber (soft maple species). Chucked the 6" diameter piece in the Shopsmith in lathe mode, and turned something for the first time. Well, OK. It was a carving mallet, rather than a piece of art. And I still have to get it dry without cracking, spalting and/or molding. But that was as much fun as I've had in weeks, working with wood.
The woodworking neighbor came over after work, and we visited while I rested up from hunching over the Shopsmith (it would be nice if it were 8" higher.) Turns out, he has a bunch of turning gear he hasn't used in several years. Chuck(s), duplicator, variable speed midi-lathe, etc. Whe it warms up, we'll pull his out of the garage, and make us some bowls or something. The walnut might be ready by then.
Too bad you're all the way across the country.
Patriarch
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Patriarch writes:

The only liquidamber I know is L. styraciflua, AKA sweetgum. It's a member of the witchhazel family, not maple.
Did you find another?
Charlie Self "One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above that which is expected." George W. Bush
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote in

Probably not. I was going on the leaf structure, not a book.
Wasn't the only time yesterday I made an error.
Patriarch
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Aren't sweetgums sometimes called spiny maple? --dave

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Dave Jackson asks:

Not anywhere I've been. Around here, they're gum or red gum, and in some places they're called alligator tree, satin walnut, and star-leafed gum.
It's also not as easy to get hold of as I'd like. Thought I had some coming, but it's a couple weeks late.
Charlie Self "One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above that which is expected." George W. Bush
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) writes:

For those lucky enough to live in California, http://www.bakerhardwoods.com / has redgum available. Some pretty nice claro slabs, too. Ain't cheep.
scott

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Surely you are not talking about old "common gum" which grows damn near everywhere in my part of the world and has a grain pattern so bad that people will not even try to use it for firewood ???
You can't split gum with most explosives...
I didn't think anybody but the paper company used gum.
Charlie Self wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

The paper company, and the guy who sold Dad a whole truckload of gum for firewood one year. The load was about 70% red gum, 30% miscellaneous, with some oak in there. Dad used to hand me a maul and say "Here, go get some exercise."
I used to quarter a piece of oak in two whacks, then get a piece of gum to humble myself a little. We had one huge red gum crotch in particular. I forget how many times we hit that damn thing, but it was up there. Broke two mauls on it, and got three or four wedges stuck in it. We finally got it cut up somehow. Probably sawed it with a chainsaw or something, I imagine.
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Patriach notes:

Oh. Well, the book, if you can find a copy, is Woodworker's Guide To Selecting & Milling Wood. Betterway Books, Cincinnati, 1994. I'm hoping to sell an updated and more complete version to a publisher some time this year.
Charlie Self "One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above that which is expected." George W. Bush
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote in

Patriarch
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On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 19:00:46 -0600, the inscrutable Patriarch

Ditto here. (Hurry, Charlie!) (Hey, I found the earlier version in my library system.)
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Silvan asks:

You're not looking in the right places. Blacksburg is an area with a number of sawmills. Make your neighbors happy and stack and sticker rough lumber on cement blocks, with old metal roofing to cover the top. But it all in 8/4 thickness and wait two years.

There are your curves.

Yuk.
Eventually, you will.

Pad sawing. Make a pad of lumber and cut multiple odd shaped pieces at one time. Start doing work that requires more curves (but avoid bandsawn boxes: I have yet to see one that doesn't look like a piece from a worm).
A bandsaw is good for cutting almost any odd or eccentric shape, not just curves. And it does so much more safely than you can do it on a bandsaw.
Start making more really small projects so you can resaw that 4/4 stuff.
Charlie Self "One of the common denominators I have found is that expectations rise above that which is expected." George W. Bush
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Huh? Did you mean "than you can do it on a tablesaw"?
Bob
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Charlie Self wrote:

Where? I'm going on what my boss said. He used to be in the sawmill business around here, and he still cuts his own trees for fun. I asked him about this, and he pretty much scratched his head coming up with any place to buy real species like walnut, or walnut, or maybe walnut. He said that he and all the other local woodcutters he knows about send off their walnut and cherry to the log peeler directly, do not pass go.
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On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 00:42:41 -0500, Silvan wrote:

Don't forget cutting frozen food. You can cut frozen bread slices perfect for the toaster. But don't let a butcher use it to cut moose. Your workshop will end up smelling of moose for months. (DAMHIKT)
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To add to that, if you use it to cut up a bunch of pumpkins for fresh pumpkin pies, be sure to clean up all of the orange goo quickly, cuz once it dries, it's a real PITA to remove. Also, DAMHIKT ;) --dave

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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

I cut some smoked salmon for a friend (with a fee of salmon, of course). Took a while to get it all out...
Did a dandy job though.
PK
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

I already have a metal-cutting bandsaw for that kind of stuff. :)
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I just entered the BS works about 9 months ago after being a TS guy for over a decade. Yes, it does curves and resawing as expected, but the surprise benefit is stopped interior/stopped cuts and the ability to safely and quickly freehand quick & dirty (or precise for that matter) things:
Example: I want to hold a long piece with pointy ends between the dogs on my bench. Any significant pressure directly on the pointy ends would damage them. Solution: take two little pices of scrap wood flat against each dog, set the piece on top of them and trace the ends onto the little squares. Cut out trace lines on the BS. Voila, custom cauls. That took about 90 seconds.
My general impression is that *most* of what I want to do with a bandsaw can be done with the combination of a jig saw and table saw. (hey I can resaw up to 6" with my TS). But w/ a BS many of these operations are just easier and safer. It is a really nice tool to have around. I think that would will go to that saw for more than just curves and resawing. Things for which you might have previously used another tool.
I'm really glad I have one now.
-Steve
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