Seeking historical information or pictures


I build railroad-themed dioramas and the current project is a 3'x4' HO-scale (1:87) scene of a Maine seaport. Several of the buildings will be small "factories" -- like a "Dory Manufacturer" -- and I'm trying to get some information on the prototype power tools and working conditions of the woodworking industry in the late 1930's or early 1940's (ignoring the ugly historical fact of WWII because it just complicates things too much). Anyway, if anyone has firsthand knowledge of the type of machinery used, references to books with pictures (or even better, websites), I'd be very appreciative. Working conditions are also of interest as it relates to depicting people at work.
TIA Norm
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Norm Dresner wrote:

Hey Norm. That sounds like a fun project. I've never seen a really detailed interior on a railroad model. I thought that they were really just concerned with the exteriors of the buildings. Is what you do atypical or is it that I just don't get out enough? ;)
R
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RicodJour wrote:

As a long time modeller, I'd say that most don't pay a lot of attention to the interiors. But there's a sizable subset that do. So much so that there are manufacturers of scale industrial tools. Sawmills, machinists shops, mills, smelters, etc.. Even some lathes and stationary steam engines. I remember one discussion on the best way to represent the jackshafts and belts of an early factory.
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| Norm Dresner wrote: | > I build railroad-themed dioramas and the current project is a 3'x4' HO-scale | > (1:87) scene of a Maine seaport. Several of the buildings will be small | > "factories" -- like a "Dory Manufacturer" -- and I'm trying to get some | > information on the prototype power tools and working conditions of the | > woodworking industry in the late 1930's or early 1940's (ignoring the ugly | > historical fact of WWII because it just complicates things too much). | > Anyway, if anyone has firsthand knowledge of the type of machinery used, | > references to books with pictures (or even better, websites), I'd be very | > appreciative. Working conditions are also of interest as it relates to | > depicting people at work. | | Hey Norm. That sounds like a fun project. I've never seen a really | detailed interior on a railroad model. I thought that they were really | just concerned with the exteriors of the buildings. Is what you do | atypical or is it that I just don't get out enough? ;) |
Since I firmly believe that watching a model train run around in a circle is the second most boring thing a man can do, I don't have a layout -- which is where most "Model Railroaders" spend their time and effort. On layouts the main emphasis is on operation and building interiors are generally far enough away so as to not be seen by anyone except the birds. But fortunately Model Railroading is two hobbies, "Railroading" and "Modeling" so I engage in the second by building dioramas. In these, the buildings are rarely more than a foot away from the edge and the interiors are quite visible for those buildings with large enough or numerous enough windows or doors. Norm
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I'm scared to ask, but what's the most boring? <g>
-- Mark
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| | > Since I firmly believe that watching a model train run around in a circle | > is | > the second most boring thing a man can do | | I'm scared to ask, but what's the most boring? <g>
<LOL> Fishing!
Norm
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Follow the link to http://www.spikesys.com/EBT/Shops /. There are internal links on this page to machines used by the East Broad Top Railroad in Pennsylvania. Although the equipment shown is probably not specifically related to boat building shops in Maine, you will get an idea of what how a belt driven facility is laid out and what old machinery looks like.
This shop complex is still in existence, albeit not working. It was closed down in 1956 and has only recently seen serious renovation efforts.
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wrote: | | >I build railroad-themed dioramas and the current project is a 3'x4' HO-scale | >(1:87) scene of a Maine seaport. Several of the buildings will be small | >"factories" -- like a "Dory Manufacturer" -- and I'm trying to get some | >information on the prototype power tools and working conditions of the | >woodworking industry in the late 1930's or early 1940's (ignoring the ugly | >historical fact of WWII because it just complicates things too much). | >Anyway, if anyone has firsthand knowledge of the type of machinery used, | >references to books with pictures (or even better, websites), I'd be very | >appreciative. Working conditions are also of interest as it relates to | >depicting people at work. | > | >TIA | Norm, | Follow the link to http://www.spikesys.com/EBT/Shops /. There are internal links | on this page to machines used by the East Broad Top Railroad in Pennsylvania. | Although the equipment shown is probably not specifically related to boat | building shops in Maine, you will get an idea of what how a belt driven | facility is laid out and what old machinery looks like. | | This shop complex is still in existence, albeit not working. It was closed down | in 1956 and has only recently seen serious renovation efforts. |
From what little I do know, belt-driven machinery is more typical of the 1900-1920 era and by the end of the '30s we were getting machines with local electric motors. I suppose that some of the shops would still have the old equipment and this is a fabulous resource. Thanks much for the link Norm
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Have you gone to the library and looked at old picture books. You may have to look in the art photos section. Some of the government projects of the thirties photographed every thing. I have found that there is a lot of information in painting and photos about some very common things
Norm Dresner wrote:

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I have a very slow and painful way for you to get very exact information on what you're looking for: patent searches. The web site http://www.pat2pdf.org allows free patent searches, downloadable as pdf files. The search feature at the govt. patent office only goes back to 1976. Go to pat2pfd, pick an arbitrary number and pull up that patent. You can tell by the date on the patent how close you are to the time period you want. Once you're within range, do a sequential search.
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| | I have a very slow and painful way for you to get very exact information on | what you're looking for: patent searches. The web site | http://www.pat2pdf.org allows free patent searches, downloadable as pdf | files. The search feature at the govt. patent office only goes back to | 1976. Go to pat2pfd, pick an arbitrary number and pull up that patent. | You can tell by the date on the patent how close you are to the time period | you want. Once you're within range, do a sequential search.
Fabulous resource. Thanks much for the link and the explanation. Norm
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