Sears CompuCarve - Amazing

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Found in the new Craftsman catalog.
I was standing over the garbage can idly thumbing through the Craftsman catalog that came in the mail, prior to throwing it in the can when I came across this:
Craftsman CompuCarve Compact Woodworking Machine, Computer-Controlled
Compact, computer-controlled, 3-dimensional woodworking machine with an easy-to-use interface. It allows a novice to make a complete project without a shop full of tools.The unique configuration allows it to perform many other woodworking functions, including ripping, cross cutting, mitering, contouring, jointing and routing. The CompuCarve can work in most soft materials, including wood, plastics (polycarbonate or cast acrylic) and certain types of high density foam. Set includes CompuCarve machine, (1) 1/16 in. carbide carving bit, (1) 1/8 in. carbide cutting bit, CarveWright Memory Card, starter software package, (2) 1/4 in. bit adaptors, vacuum bag adaptor, bit removal tool, hex wrench, owner's manual and Quick Start Guide. Built-in computer walks you through project setup QuickRout technology makes changing bits quick and easy Memory card - no need to keep a computer in the shop CarveWright design software is powerful yet easy to use - even novices can create complex designs in minutes Expandable 3-D design library Patented rising-head and feed-through configuration handles work pieces up to 14-1/2 in. W, 5 in. H and almost any length Allows you to achieve professional results regardless of space, time, budget or skill Requires a PC running Windows 2000 or XP with 128 MB RAM (256 MB or greater recommended), 75 MB of hard drive space and an accelerated graphics card with OpenGL support
It looks like they started with a 14" planar body and added the computer control and the bit holder.
Price: $1,899.99, Out of Stock.
No use posting the link, it had a cookie with it. The Sears part number is 00921754000.
Two things were mind-boggling: 1) the price: <$2000 for a computer-controlled woodworking machine, and 2) it came from Sears.
Guys, we're entering a new phase in woodworking.
And, of course I have no affiliation with Sears aside from the screwdriver set I bought 15 years ago.
--
Vince Heuring To email, remove the Vince.

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WOW, at that price no wonder its out of stock! Troy
Vince Heuring wrote:

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I would sure like to see it work. Must be really slow, but if it is set and forget...
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It appears to be a CarveWright
http://www.carveright.com /

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That could be why it uses ... "
CarveWright Memory Card, "
:P
Tall Oak wrote:

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"Troy" wrote in message

Damn ... I thought there was finally a crockpot for the shop.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/01/06
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That was a clue but don't jump to quick though. Craftsman could have had this manufactured to a proprietary "Craftsman" spec. I looked at the CarveWright before and thought it was funny that Craftsman would stick their name on it, since nowadays they do sell other brands.

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Vince Heuring (in 151020060946554457% snipped-for-privacy@dimensional.com) said:
| Found in the new Craftsman catalog.
<snip>
| Guys, we're entering a new phase in woodworking.
Not really. If I read the carveright.com FAQ correctly, cutter positioning is accurate in 0.006" increments. For quality joinery, I found the ShopBot's 0.001" accuracy inadequate - and built my own machine from scratch to shrink the resolution to 0.00023". It's a "get what you pay for" situation. Anyone who hasn't already can see my ugly (but accurate!) machine by following the link below.
One of the things that's been fun for me is that my DIY machine's body is baltic birch plywood. :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/JBot.html
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Morris Dovey wrote:
[snip]

Mosquito bombers were plywood. Fine pieces of equipment indeed. Spruce...like Martin guitars? I will never apologize for the proper application of plywood, as I know you haven't. Used in a proper application, plywood is good stuff. Real good stuff.
http://www.hermanmiller.com/CDA/SSA/Product/0,,a10-c440-p47,00.html
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Sun, Oct 15, 2006, 10:00pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@topworks.ca (Robatoy) doth writeth: Mosquito bombers were plywood. <snip>
And I've got a book that shows how it was done. Hehehe Unfortunately I don't have much use for a bomber, being as how I don't care for flying anymore.
PT Boats where alsol made from plywood, along with various other military craft. And if you want to see some high quality boats with plywood used in them, check out WoodenBoat sometime.
I won't say a lot of high-end furniture is made from plywood. Some is certainly, but plywood often is talso he material of choice of some of the "artistes" that "make furniture" - and the stuff they make I don't consider "fine", and sometimes not even "furniture". There is some furniture made from plywood that I do think looks very good, sadly I thik most of it is vastly overriced too..
I'm pretty fascinated with plywood, it's my wood of choice for my most of my jigs, all my patterns, and a sizeable percentage of my projects, in whole or part.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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J T wrote:

It's worth distinguishing Mosquitoes from PT boats though. Boats were "made from plywood", i.e. there was a shed where plywood went in and boats came out. Mosquitoes weren't "made from it" in the same way - individual sheets of single veneers went in and they only became multi-lam plywood whilst in the curved Mosquito-shaped mould. This allowed much better control of tight curves and also fewer joins.
Incidentally, the first UK jet aircraft were plywood too. Those early twin-boom designs like the Vampire and Venom were a Mosquito-stye plywood egg containing the pilot and engine, in front of two skinny aluminium tube booms to the tailplane.
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(Robatoy) doth

The Gotha 226 and Heinkel 162 jets that the Germans didn't quite have done in time to see combat was also plywood.
As to plywood fine furniture, the Eames lounge chair is a plywood classic.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Not sure about the Gotha, but the He 162 was built from ready-laminated plywood sheets for the wings and an aluminium monocoque fuselage. The one German aircraft that followed the Mosquito construction technique was the near-copy Ta154 Moskito. This was famously a failure after the Tego-film glue plant was bombed and there was no viable alternative for the moulded bonding process.
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(Morris comments about the accuracy of his DIY CNC router vs ShopBot)
So you've improved from xx1 to xx023. How much did yours cost?
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Smaug Ichorfang (in Xns985E1290660DEgoblinbiter@207.115.17.102) said:
| (Morris comments about the accuracy of his DIY CNC router vs | ShopBot) | | So you've improved from xx1 to xx023. How much did yours cost?
That's a difficult question to answer completely. The finished JBot materials cost was close to US$1K - but I made at least three of every part (not included in the total) and I didn't keep track of my time.
It'd have been difficult (but possible) for me to build the JBot without the ShopBot; but having that to make the baltic birch parts and being able to use it as a CNC milling machine for aluminum made things much easier. Without the ShopBot, I would have had to have all of the metal parts made for me.
Also not included in that total was the time spent "noodling", producing the CAD drawings (an absolute necessity for this project!), and hand-coding - and debugging - the part programs that controlled the ShopBot.
The interesting side effect is, of course, that when it was all done I had all of the design and debugged part programs to create knock-offs.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Mon, Oct 16, 2006, 7:42am (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@iedu.com (MorrisDovey) doth sayeth: <snip> I didn't keep track of my time. <snip>
Good thing for you that you were working for free then. 'Cause if you'd charged yourself by the hour you might have padded your time, and then you might not have been able to afford to finish the machine after you'd paid yourself. I always charge myself low in cases like that, so I know I can afford to finish. Charity begins at home.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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On Mon, 16 Oct 2006 09:54:03 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Just run a tab, bro... lol
Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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Mon, Oct 16, 2006, 9:48am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@bajadavis.com (macdavis) doth adviseth: Just run a tab, bro... lol
No way. I'd probably not be able to pay myself, which means I'd have to sue myself to get my pay, which means I'd probably have to declare bankrupcy. It's just not worth running a tab.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Interesting. Did you end up needing to use some of the extra parts? Or did things generally fit well.

Do you plan to do that? Build and sell some knockoffs?
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bf (in snipped-for-privacy@e3g2000cwe.googlegroups.com) said:
| Morris Dovey wrote: || Smaug Ichorfang (in Xns985E1290660DEgoblinbiter@207.115.17.102) || said: || ||| (Morris comments about the accuracy of his DIY CNC router vs ||| ShopBot) ||| ||| So you've improved from xx1 to xx023. How much did yours cost? || || That's a difficult question to answer completely. The finished JBot || materials cost was close to US$1K - but I made at least three of || every part (not included in the total) and I didn't keep track of || my time. | | Interesting. Did you end up needing to use some of the extra parts? | Or did things generally fit well.
The re-made parts were to correct for design or part programming goofs in the replaced parts. The final parts fit exceedingly well - but the replaced parts are all firewood.
|| The interesting side effect is, of course, that when it was all || done I had all of the design and debugged part programs to create || knock-offs. | | Do you plan to do that? Build and sell some knockoffs?
If someone wanted to buy one, then I'd be happy to build more. If they come out of my shop, I probably shouldn't call 'em knock-offs. :-)
FWIW, it's a really good learning exercise to DIY...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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