Sealing the lids on paint tins

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"Larry W" wrote:

Plastic non marking hammer with a shot filled head.
Available in bright colors at a low price.
Lew
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Never heard the term "dead weight hammer" used to describe a "dead blow hammer" before, just wanted to make sure I knew what you meant.
--
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Larry W" wrote:

--------------------------- Works for me<G>.
Lew
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I have just been away for a few days so missed the beginning of this tread.
For several years I have been adding gas from my blowtorch to the open can before firmly replacing the lid. Excluding the air in this way means my part tins of paint are always usable with no more than a thorough stir. Wiping as much paint of the rims of both the lid and the tin also helps.
Last weekend I used some very old lead based matt black from a gallon tin I had not opened for at least 7 years. It took a fair bit of stirring but had no skin and gave a perfect result. I originally bought the tin of paint from an MOD surplus dealer for a fiver after the RAF had scrapped it for being out of date, the use by date on the tin was 1990!!!
Mike
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On 7/7/2011 7:36 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Are'nt all hammers "dead weight" hammers? LOL
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Leon wrote:

No, the extra hammers are.
Bill
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With sufficient air space in the tin the oil paint will skin over anyway, this will protect the remaining paint and depending on the type of paint you are supposed to either cut off and remove the skin then thoroughly stir or stir in the skin and then strain through a nylon stocking or purpose made paint strainer.
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I remember many many years ago seeing on TV a system of lids for glass jars with a self sealing valve on top and a sort of hand operated vacuum pump. The idea being you removed any air after putting back on the lid. Rather like canning works, but without the heat.
It was short term storage of edible products - and may well have been before most had 'fridges. But like many such things on TV, never saw it again.
--
*Toilet stolen from police station. Cops have nothing to go on.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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I still have one. Uses the same pump and same design of valve as vac-u-vin.

Some still available. Just pop "vacuvin storage" into the search engine of your choice. Bit pricey for paint though and possibly not suitable for oil based paints 'cos of the effects of "the vapours".
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Robin
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On 05/07/2011 13:46, snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

What's the deal there - I never know what to do for the best when I come across skin on paint. I usually make a judgement on whether it will actually ever stir in, and if not (eg if it's an eighth of an inch of hard dry crust!) I remove it.
What does it do to the quality of the paint itself? Would the underlying paint become more (or less?) concentrated from repeated removal of skin? Or is the skin layer identical in quality/content to the liquid?
David
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It depends how thick the skin is, if it is thin then usually the oil has not separated and you can just lift the skin off, If it is thick and sat on separated oil then this oil should be stirred back in and then strained to remove the bits of skin, this way you don't lose the integrity of the paint.

Oil paint is not resoluble so you have to remove the skin but sometimes the skin is so thick and hard the paint underneath will need that bit of medium that's still stuck to the base of the skin. Oil paint will become concentrated during use anyway as the solvents or oil evaporate.
You can however add a little boiled Linseed oil if the paint appears far too thick to be satisfactorily usable.
Stephen.
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Without stirring it (or maybe after first stirring very carefully, without breaking the skin), you decant most of the paint off into another container. You then scrape off the sludge from the inside of the lid, add it to the paint you have decanted, and stir it in well.
After you have used the paint, if there's still some left, you can pour it back unto the original tin until the next time you need it.
Once opened, I suspect that a re-sealed tin often allows small amounts of air to get in. Storing it upside down probably helps the lid to be absolutely air-tight - just make sure it doesn't leak!

--
Ian

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On Tue, 5 Jul 2011 14:00:08 +0100, Ian Jackson wrote:

Gawd what a faff and lots of containers all mucky with paint...

See other comments about tins stuck to shelves. Think I'll stick with cleaning lid rim and can carefully and tapping the lid fully home. With maybe an inversion to get paint around the inner edges but store the right way up.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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That's the container (a large ex-pickled cabbage glass jar works for me) you use to give your brush its first clean with white spirit. You then leave the contents for a week or two, until the paint settles into a sludge, then decant off the white spirit for re-use. Put the jar away for a few months, until the sludge solidifies, then remove the sludge, and dispose of it as a solid lump. Re-use the jar for brush cleaning etc.

Don't you line your shelves with sheets of newspaper?

--
Ian

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On 05/07/2011 12:11, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Carefully. Although, if I keep a paint long enough for it to skin, the skin is usually so thick that the propblem is how to break it.
Colin Bignell
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On 05/07/2011 12:11, Dave Liquorice wrote:

As the man says. If the skin is on the top you can cut it and remove it ... if underneath it will be mixed, broken and you will have to sieve the paint.
:-)
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wrote:

Straining is necessary in either instance. Once my can of Bloxygen is gone, I'll start using argon from my TIG welder to keep stop skinning.
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Only if there's more than 1/2 a tin left when you put it away!
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I've never had a skin form in any tin stored upside down. Skin forms because refitted lid rarely seals perfectly and you get slow air exchange, but it does seal much better if you store the tin upside down (and is noticably harder to open;-).
By the way, I noticed on the instructions on a tin it said "do not open with a screwdriver". So what are you supposed to use? I used a screwdriver...
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Andrew Gabriel
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On Tue, 05 Jul 2011 21:11:59 +0100, Andrew Gabriel

Smile. Get to know the staff. And ask nicely in a Johnstone's decorator centre. And they might give you a special paint tin opener.
That's what I did. Unfortunately not one of the nice Johnstone's branded ones as they had run out, but a not so nice old Dulux one. Can't win 'em all.
Rod
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