Sealing Pine Knots

Page 1 of 2  
I've been using shellac to seal pine knots and I've been happy with the results in that the knot doesn't bleed through. The problem I have is that I usually end up painting the project with white paint which doesn't cover the shellaced spots very well. I have to put on at three coats of paint to cover it and even then, it still doesn't look very good. Before anyone suggests I switch to a different type of wood, I use pine because it's cheap and I don't mind covering it with paint. I'm not a big fan of using a hardwood to just cover it up with paint.
Does anyone else use something besides shellac to seal the knots that works well when painted? I know Zinser makes a primer that includes shellac and I've used it before but after a year or so, the knots still bleed through.
My method once sanding is complete is to put the shellac on the knots, sand lightly with 220 grit, then apply latex primer, sand again lightly with 220 grit, then apply latex paint.
Thanks in advance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is this an interior or exterior application? In either instance I would start by switching to an alkyd primer over the shellac. If it's an interior application I always use an alkyd enamel.
--
NuWave Dave in Houston



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

relative to alkyd.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
message

Alkyd enamel is the one to beat. Acrylic comes close, might be worth a try if you hate the smell of varnish. Latex is good for rolling onto walls and not much else.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wed, Oct 24, 2007, 5:11pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (FerdFarkel) doth sayeth: <snip> Latex is good for rolling onto walls and not much else. You've obviously not been keeping informed. That's not the case anymore. Check to see what type of paint most houses are being painted with now..
JOAT "I'm an Igor, thur. We don't athk quethtionth." "Really? Why not?" "I don't know, thur. I didn't athk."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

While I agree with your point, the fact that most houses are being painted with it now doesn't necessarily mean that it's good, only that it's politically correct.
For older houses that have been repainted several times it's a safe choice as well--you don't really know what kind of cheap crap the last guy put on, and latex will go over oil and stick but oil won't go over latex and stick.
I need to strip mine to the bare wood at some point--the paint's peeling but it's not any paint that I applied--the peel is between a blue layer and a green layer and it's been white as long as I've had it.

--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Use a blond or super blond shellac" Mix your own and buy DEWAXED. Any Woodcraft store etc or goggle it on line. Blond flaked and denatured alchol. I apply with cloth in a pad and a squirt bottle but brush is fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We are repeatedly reminded by our regular Benjamin Moore dealer (Southwestern Paint/FM 1960) that coming EPA regulations will mandate remaining levels of solvent(s) in alkyd paints out in the not-so-distant future.

If it's a tract house then the last guy was probably the builder and the paint was probably Monarch, the cheapest available. We regularly see five-six-seven year old homes with their trendy, exterior crown or other millwork rotting off due in no small part to poor detailing and cheap materials (which includes the choice of paint).
--
NuWave Dave in Houston



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave In Houston wrote:

Don't think the builder would have painted it white on top of blue on top of green. And I'm pretty sure there's a layer or two under the green.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
).

True enough; you're situation doesn't qualify.
--
NuWave Dave in Houston



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 25, 1:01 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

What do you use for trim? For doors or bookshelves, where you don't want sticking and callbacks?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ferd Farkel wrote:

There are lots of good non-blocking latex paints available.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Love to try one. What brands?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Father Haskell wrote:

The last I used was Pratt & Lambert. It was a satin "antique white", leaning towards gray / violet. I know "antique white" narrows it down for maybe 500 colors. <G> No sticking at all on doors, bookshelves and CD shelves.
I'm not anti-alkyd. I really like Ben Moore's "Fresh Start" primer for problem moist bathrooms.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thu, Oct 25, 2007, 9:38am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (FerdFarkel) doth query: What do you use for trim? For doors or bookshelves, where you don't want sticking and callbacks?
Latex. Latex. Latex. Paint every damn near everything with latex. I'm even thinking of painting my truck with latex. The only thing I use oil base paint for anymore is painting my tools yellow. I'd use latex on them too, but I don't feel like being bothered with primer first.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

Actually you may not have much choice but to paint your truck with waterborne paint in a few more years. Not latex, but not oil either. Your tax dollars at work.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thu, Oct 25, 2007, 9:47pm snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (J.Clarke) doth sayeth: Actually you may not have much choice but to paint your truck with waterborne paint in a few more years. Not latex, but not oil either. Your tax dollars at work.
I bought a can of spray latex (yellow, of course), to try out. Used it on some old .50 ammo cans. Seemed to go on just as well as regular spray paint, and seems to be holding up as well too. Smelled better too.
JOAT It's not hard, if you get your mind right. - Granny Weatherwax
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

Back when I flew r/c combat, 7-8 years ago, I used spray latex on foam wings, as solvent based paint would eat the foam. I thought it worked pretty well then, and would imagine it getting better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote:

My '05 American-made Tacoma _is_ painted with waterborne, as it was built in Northern California. They've been doing this there for years. The same factory also builds Toyota Corollas and Pontiac Vibes --> <http://www.nummi.com/home.php .
From what I've seen with high-quality waterborne finishes, we shouldn't worry.
I have no idea what paint is on Mexican-built Tacomas, though. <G>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

While I know that the OP has rejected it, for reasons that may be right for him, I'd strongly second this suggestion. While I agree that an alkyd enamel provides better leveling and harder/more attractive surface, if the OP still wants to use latex as a top coat, I'd still recommend the oil-base primer. At the very least, buy an aerosol can of Kilz or BIN oil-based primer and spray just the knots before brushing on your latex primer. I can't imagine a knot bleeding through shellac + oil-based primer + latex primer + latex topcoat!
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.