sealing end grains on gate / compressor bleed out

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a) I know you can use glue sizing (1 part glue, 10 parts water) as a pre-finish seal on end grain. Can this be done on outside as well, specifically cedar end grain?
b) any suggestions on how to bleed out a 27 gallon compressor easily when not using? I jsut leave it pressurized all the time, which I know is not good for the tank or fittings? Valve is on the bottom, of course.
Chris
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a) Yes but it will not be waterproof. You be better off using epoxy.
b) Why is leaving it pressurized not good for the tank or fittings? I've always left mine pressurized and still have no problems after 25+ years. The rubber hoses are no worse for the constant pressure either. Art
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On 06/23/2010 02:53 PM, cc wrote:

How do you "know" this? I have a 60 gallon Sanborn that's 20 years old and it NEVER gets depressurized, and it's never caused me a single problem.
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On 6/23/2010 3:53 PM, cc wrote:

Make sure it's a waterproof glue.

If you're concerned about condensation buildup rusing out the tank, take a look at <http://www.harborfreight.com/automatic-compressor-drain-kit-46960.html>
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Yeah, I installed this on my 25 gallon cheapie compressor. It worked for about a week, then one day the outlet got stuck, maybe something stuck in it. I was futzing with it when it just crumbled. You get what you pay for at HF.
I just wired up the tank with a 4' hose coming from the bottom with a standard air gun on the end and I just air it it out whenever I am over on that area of the shop. In the summer here in california I never see any mist but get a good spray during cold weather.
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On 06/23/2010 11:47 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

You should put your review of their turd on their site.

That's a good idea. Do you get any air leakage with this rig that causes the compressor to cycle periodically? If so, how often?
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This is a cool idea but remember that the pressure if "FULL", keep some kind of valve on it if you don't want a lot of air and water to come out at one time.
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On 6/24/2010 7:16 AM, Steve Turner wrote:

Year ago I moved the bottom drain plug to the end of a 3' length of air hose on my small vertical, where it is much more accessible.
The air hose holds quite a bit of water that would otherwise be in the tank, and, unlike the tank, is rustproof ... and gravity does the work.
It is a simple matter to open the cock slightly every other day or so and let the water in the hose squirt out, and draining the tank this way doesn't even cause the compressor to cycle on.
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Swingman wrote: ...

That's actually kinda' kewt... :)
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I keep my tank pressurized all the time, also. I use it for the woodshop and upholstery shop and drain the tank at at least twice a week.
That 3' hose, off the drain cock, sounds like a great idea!!!
Addendum: Don't forget to oil your air tools often. This is what I fail to do often enough... I just don't think to do it, until a tool starts jamming.
Sonny
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On 6/24/2010 2:47 PM, Sonny wrote:

I've been doing it for "years" (the "year", singular, was a typo) and its always worked like a charm, besides making a good deal of sense.

I've got some nailers that need oil, and some that don't ... it's why I keep the factory stickers on all of 'em. Hell if you don't remember that you bought a Festool tool, no telling what else you don't remember. ;)
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I don't have an oiler so I do oil manually whenever I pickup the tool. My one Bostitch brad nail that dosen't want oil has NO OIL written on it with a felt pin.
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Swingman wrote:

I like the idea of having an air gun on the hose so you just squeeze for a sec as you walk by.
I know I've discussed this here before, but, getting old, I don't remember how it ended up. Your point on draining the water out of the tank, into a rustproof hose reminded me of something I've thought of, considering I never, or almost never bother to drain my tank.
I wonder if having the bottom of a metal tank void of water at any depth, just being damp, or just wet all the time is all that good? My thought is metal rusts faster being wet with lots of oxygen getting to it vs being submerged, underwater with little oxygen getting at it. I know everyone everywhere says drain your tank routinely, but after 30 years of mostly ignoring this advice, I wonder why it's made no discernible difference to my tank?
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On 6/26/2010 10:13 AM, Jack Stein wrote:

Personally, I'm less concerned with standing water rusting out the bottom of my tank than I am with it accumulating to the point where it makes it past my water filter and into the main lines, possibly ruining the spray job I'm right in the middle of. This *rarely* (if ever) happens to me here in Austin (where the humidity isn't usually very high), and I have a very good filter (an old Motor Guard M-30, like this one: http://www.sjdiscounttools.com/jlmm30.html ), but I think Sonoma's idea is a good one nonetheless, and I would be *much* more inclined to keep the tank drained if I didn't have to climb underneath it with a little bucket to catch the water, tearing up my fingers on that stubborn cutoff valve in the process...
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Steve Turner wrote:

> this one: http://www.sjdiscounttools.com/jlmm30.html ),
It's never happened to me and I live in Pgh where humidity is pretty high, although not rain forest high. I have a cheap filter (
http://jbstein.com/Flick/AirFilter.jpg ) that supposedly filters oil and water, and I've never had to drain my filter, and I've painted tons of stuff, including cars over the years and never had a problem with water or oil. I think the water in the bottom of tank never gets in the air flow, else I'd have noticed long, long ago.
but I think Sonoma's

Yeah, a great idea. I long ago put a copper extension on the drain, with a petcock that is used so infrequently I need pliers to get it to turn. Worse, I have to move a ton of junk piled in front of it to even see it.
I'm still wondering if a damp tank rusts faster than one submerged in water.
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Yep, It takes oxygen to make rust. Good dry water doesn't rust anything.
Like the old Coke with anail init. The nail always rusted off above the liquid and was siney clean below the Coke.
Bottom's up!
Yeah, a great idea. I long ago put a copper extension on the drain, with a petcock that is used so infrequently I need pliers to get it to turn. Worse, I have to move a ton of junk piled in front of it to even see it.
I'm still wondering if a damp tank rusts faster than one submerged in water.
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...and water is Hydrogen and...?

You must drink that crappy "instant water" stuff.

^^^^^ You misspelled "anal".

Yep, misspelled.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Ever try breathing under water? Certainly water contains oxygen, the question I have is does metal rust faster under water with small amounts of oxygen or under damp conditions, with lots of oxygen available?
I have no clue what the inside of my tank looks like. If it ever fails, maybe tomorrow, maybe in another 30 years, perhaps I'll cut the sucker in half and see where it rusted.
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Water is composed hydrogen and oxygen atoms. Rust is not an atomic chemistry level reaction.
Water does **NOT** contain oxygen molecules unless some oxygen molecules have been disolved in it. This is why closed loop heating systems, made almost completely out of iron and steel pipe and fittings do not rust themselves out.
and water is Hydrogen and...?
Ever try breathing under water? Certainly water contains oxygen, the question I have is does metal rust faster under water with small amounts of oxygen or under damp conditions, with lots of oxygen available?
I have no clue what the inside of my tank looks like. If it ever fails, maybe tomorrow, maybe in another 30 years, perhaps I'll cut the sucker in half and see where it rusted.
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Josepi wrote:

Oh, really??? What, then, pray tell is oxidation???
Rust is Fe203, primarily an oxidation product of Fe and O2.

Which is, in fact, the case w/ virtually all water in contact w/ air as the solubility of O2 is reasonably high...
<http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/oxygen-solubility-water-d_841.html
Where does the air entrained in hot water come from you think???

...
Mostly because they have controls to prevent the introduction of additional air and maintenance practices to remove what is in them...
<http://www.facilitiesnet.com/ms/articlePrint.asp?idF84
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