Sealing edge of particle board

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This isn't really much in the way of a "fine woodworking" question, but I hope it will be close enough to on topic.
I bought a metal shelving unit that uses particle board to put on top of the structure. The particle board, of course, is unfinished.
As I will be at least putting a coat of primer on the particle board, I am looking for a way to seal up the edges.
I have seen references to using a thin mixture of wood glue, and that seems like a decent way to go. For anyone who has used that, how thin did you make it? Maybe a 1:2 ratio of water to glue?
Any other methods?
Thanks,
Jon
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"Jon Danniken" wrote:

------------------------- These days I'd run some masking tape on the flat surfaces to protect them and then apply several coats of dewaxed shellac.
Allow a couple of weeks to dry, then apply primer.
Lew
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On Fri, 28 May 2010 20:39:07 -0700, "Jon Danniken"

When I cut a hole in a particle board countertop to install a sink, I just seal the edge with a couple coats of Kilz primer, ot thick latex paint - which ever is readilly available.
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Latex caulk. Art
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Artemus wrote:

'Ya know, that had actually crossed my mind. I wonder if thinning it slightly with some latex primer would make it more "brushable" and give it bit more penetration.
Jon
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I've not had any problems with it sticking and I just run a finger down the edge pushing it in as I go and cleaning the excess with a paper towel. This leaves a slight texture and if you want a dead flat edge with crisp corners then drywall compound put on with a putty knife is a better way to go. Art
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FWIW, I bought a similar shelf several months ago. Upon attempting to paint the "bare" wood, the paint didn't take like it would on bare wood. There might be a finish of some sort on the shelves that take care of your problem (or cause some later.)
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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Puckdropper wrote:

Aye, I did notice that the top/bottom of the shelves were a lot smoother than I expect from particle board. I think I'll Q-tip a dab of paint on the end before I leave this morning and see what it looks like later.
Thanks,
Jon
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Jon Danniken wrote:

Why bother sealing edges? The whole panel is made that way. The whole panel will absorb water like a wet sponge.
I do a lot of boat woodwork these days. Edges do have more pores to work with. But particle board?
I have eight of those shelf units now. I sprayed first half with sanding sealer. They are in a lot better shape than the newer bare ones.
If you use water based glue. what will happen when the shelves get wet?
Paint 'em. Kilz should work well for what they are..
--

Richard Lamb



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On 5/29/2010 2:29 AM, cavelamb wrote:

The same thing that happens to a house painted with "water based paint" when it rains? Like, not much?
There's a difference between "waterborne" and "water soluble when cured".
Sure, white glue softens when it gets wet, but Titebond III doesn't. And next time you use some urea-formaldehyde, toss the cured lump that's always left over in a jar of water and put it on a shelf and a year later see if it's softened any.

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Jon,
Several years ago, I made closet shelves out of 3/4" particle board. To smooth out the edges I used dry wall compound for a filler. Then I painted them. They are still as good as ever. Dry wall compound is cheap dries pretty fast and is easy to sand.
Bea
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Bea Essor wrote:

Ingenious idea Bea, thanks. That would also smooth it out really well, and I still have a big box of the stuff.
Jon
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Near as I can tell, it goes by the generic name of edging or edge banding. I have no experience with it, but plan to try it if I cut some vaneered particle board and need to cover the exposed raw edges.
http://www.joewoodworker.com/veneering/edgebanding-guide.htm
nb
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notbob wrote:

Neat product. I usually glue veneer on the edge of plywood for projects, but that looks a heckuva lot easier (and quicker) to apply. Thanks!
Jon
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On Sat, 29 May 2010 10:45:19 -0700, "Jon Danniken"

The "iron on" stuff sometimes works, but more often comes off before you want it to. I often use the "pound in" type "T" molding to edge particle board. Just cut a saw kerf doun the middle and knock the plastic molding in.
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Excuse my cluelessness, but how do you saw such a slot (kerf)?
nb
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wrote:

Carefully. Run the edge down across the table saw. Or, run edge in on a router table with a slot cutting bit mounted. Or, stretch a biscuit jointer to it's limits by running it along the edge. Or, run a hand held router along the edge (router base flat on face of board.
I'd use either of the router options. As would sellers of T-Molding.
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I kinda suspected the router option, but also have zero router experience. Probably should learn some router basics and look at a basic router and bits. Thank you.
nb
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I do it with a high fence on a table saw, but a friend made a jig that fits the "shoe " of his skill saw that does the job very nicely.
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On Fri, 28 May 2010 20:39:07 -0700, "Jon Danniken"

Depends on the application. I have filled edges with joint compound before sealing with a shellac primer. I guess a shop-made wood filler will work too, but less water the better--you centainly dont want the particle board to swell near the edges.
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