Screws sheared while mounting bed rail hardware. Help?

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Ok, so I decided to make my sweetie a nice oak bed (I snore something awful). Almost done; the last little bit was to cut mortises and mount the bed rail hardware (https://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid3269 ) in the posts and ends of the side rails. The hardware is drilled and countersunk for #8 screws. I drill pilot holes the length of the screw, using a Stanley adjustable pilot-clearance-countersink bit, after starting the holes using a self-centering bit through the hardware itself. In the first attempt, to mount the bed rail hooks to the side rail, two of three screws sheared at the top of the threads, leaving the potential for the bed to be held together by one presumeably already stressed screw. I *really* don't want to go back to the lumberyard and get a 7 foot length of 5/4 x 8 oak to make another rail.
As I see it, I have (at least) two problems: First, if I want to salvage the almost-completed side rail, I need to somehow extract about an inch of wood screw that is buried a good 3/8 of an inch inside a chunk of oak, preferably without doing so much damage that I can't re- use the hole. I suppose I could just lengthen the mortise and reposition the hardware, but I'm not real keen on that (fortunately, I made the side rails an inch wider than the plans called for, so I have some room to play with on the end of the rail. Any suggestions?
The second problem is what is stopping me right now: Any advice on how do drive screws in oak without shearing them? I figured a full length pilot hole in end grain, with the screw threads heavily waxed, would not present so much friction that a #8 screw would shear, but apparently it does. So far, I've sheared about 8 screws this afternoon, two in ind grain and the rest in side grain, using both Crown Bolt screws from HD and Hillcrest screws from my local lumberyard, all in pilot holes drilled the length of the screw.
I appeal to the assembled wisdom of the group to help an admitted idiot out of an embarassing jam (though not as embarassing as having the bed fall apart would be). Thanks
Jim
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There is a special bit for a drill that appears to be a hollow hole saw. You drill/saw the screw and the surrounding wood out, glue in a matching dowel and start over.

Are you using "quality" square drive screws? I would advise using at least #10 screws. Pilot holes should be large enough to accompany the unthreaded portion of the screw, preferabley you use a tapered pilot hole bit. WAX the screw before insertion.
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wrote in message snip ?

Sounds good to me. Where do you buy such a bit?

I bought a set of tapered pilot hole drills from Lee Valley and use wood screws from local hardware stores. This has solved my screw breaking problem. I also wax the screws before they go in. These bits also counter sink the hole. The screws go easily until just before they grab and then moderate pressure engages the all of the threads at once and applies remarkable clamping pressure on the joint. Try it, works. :-)
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This is not a solution. Are these China made screws? Bet 2 to 1 they are. Hmmmmmm, think I started a post a few days back about this very problem. This one probably proves my point. Use quality screws, not junk from China!
Wish you luck on this one. If screw broke at shank and below wood not sure there is a solution. If you can move the bracket over an 1/16" drill new one. Leon's solution may work. This is a tough one.
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Jim Willemin wrote:

Well, the first thing that comes to mind with the shearing is that you might want to try going up a 64th on the pilot hole diameter. If the pilot set you're using is intended for construction lumber (very likely if it's a Stanley) then it's probably a bit undersized for oak.
Try SPAX screws--between the serrated thread and the Teflon coating they drive real easy--you can get them from http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWCATS&Category@9 or from http://www.mcfeelys.com/spax .
As far as getting the busted screws out, http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyID ˜3 will do it but you end up with an oversized hole that you'll have to fill with a dowel or plug or (probably the best solution) a threaded insert such as http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid 48.
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J. Clarke wrote:

I was at Lowe's a few days ago getting some stuff and a salesman asked if I needed any help. Well, I did need some threaded inserts so I asked if they had any, knowing pretty sure they didn't. Well the salesman took me to a drawer full of tee nuts. I was impressed they had Tee nuts but in the drawer below them, they had threaded inserts. I was impressed Lowe's actually sold this stuff. Anyway, 4 threaded inserts cost over $5 and they were cheap ass china junk.
Going to the the woodcraft.com place above, you could get 10 of them for $6. Well, inspired, I went to Granger
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/guideBrowseMatches.shtml
and there you can get 100 of them for under $10.
They had a nice selection and really nice interface for getting what you want. http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/guideBrowse.shtml
I have to remember to buy some stock in Granger.
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"Jack Stein" wrote

Except that you're still buying Chinese:
http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/ticker/article.aspx?Feed=AP&Date 080211&ID72100&Symbol=US:GWW
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Swingman wrote:

http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/ticker/article.aspx?Feed=AP&Date 080211&ID72100&Symbol=US:GWW
I don't doubt that for a minute. Thing is, if you buy Chinese junk, you should at least pay cheap Chinese junk prices. Over $1.25 a piece vs less than 10 cents a piece is the point.
I liked the article though. To stay on topic in this group I might comment of interest is the government agrees to a Grainger fixed markup of 26%, yet Obama ben laden and Obama Momma want to charge Oil companies a windfall profit tax when they only make about 9% profit. I guess the government paying an automatic 26% markup to Granger makes it possible for Grainger to charge 12 times LESS than Lowe's for the exact same product...
Also of interest is where in the hell can anyone buy screws not made in China? Heck, even McFeely's were getting their screws from China before Grainger bought them.
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Jack Stein wrote:

amazing dichotomy, isn't it? Just goes to show you the hypocrisy.

I don't think it is possible. Wondering how will we defend ourselves if God forbid we ever have another WWll? We have no manufacturing base any longer.
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evodawg wrote:

...and we can't buy from China so unless we fight with wooden sticks, assuming someone knows how to make a stick, we be out of luck...
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Jack Stein wrote:

So exactly which weapons and military vehicles does the US buy from China?
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I'm gonna go out on a limb here and suggest that Jack was making a more generalized statement as to the manufacturng base(or lack thereof) that seems to remain here in the US. We might not be buying weapons from the Chinese, but we sure as hell are buying raw material from just about everyone! Raw steel production in the US is a very faint shadow of what it was after WWII...depending on the study you read, it's anywhere from 25% down to as little as 2% of WWII capacity.
Mike
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"The Davenport's" wrote:

With good reason, the day of a fully integrated steel mill are history.
You can put beams rolled in Brazil on the dock in SoCal, for less money than the cost of a heat.
Demand is down from the auto industry, in large part, due to the reduced amount of steel used to built today's automobile.
An electric melt shop, using a large percentage of scrap, can turn around in a fraction of the time that an integrated mill can respond.
The steel industry ate it's own seed corn, so to speak.
There was no reinvestment in capital improvements by the steel industry in the last 50 years.
I can think of at least a dozen integrated steel mills that I've been into, in the US, that simply don't exist any more.
Entire steel companies that don't exist (Bethlehem, etc).
The indsustry has itself to blame for it's demise.
Lew
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The Davenport's wrote:

Resources run out. Get used to it. Making "raw steel" requires iron ore. Even if all the steel in the world was produced in the US, if the ore is cut off then the production stops.
All the whining in the world won't put more ore in the ground.
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"J. Clarke" wrote:

Still plenty of iron ore in the U/P of Michigan.
Still have lots of coal for coke in Ohio and Illinois.
Limestone is readily available.
What doesn't exist is demand for US metal.
Electric melt shops have a real economic advantage over integrated mills so they have grabbed a major share of US supplied steel.
Lew
Lew
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First point...I wasn't whining, merely making a statement.
Second point...We, the United States, are NOT running out of resources to produce iron...Lots of taconite still to be had in the north range...in fact, we EXPORT a lot of it to Israel, Germany and China...who then turn it into iron and steel and then sell it to US rolling mills.
Third point...You need to lighten the *^%& up! Not all comments are made to be read literally...sometimes, there is a parable or an analogy being made. Jack makes a comment about not being able to fight WWII again because of the loss of a manufacturing base and YOU take it to be that he said we are buying weapons from the Chinese. I make a statement about raw steel production...just as one piece of american manufacturing...and YOU assume that I'm whining about running out of iron ore.
Mike
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The Davenport's wrote:

So where _are_ we buying them from since according to Jack we no longer have the capability to make them ourselves? If not from China then from where? Mexico? Zimbabwe?

No I assume you were whining about no US steel production, which you were. Incidentally the US produces about 8 million tons a month of raw steel and imports about 2.5 million tons a month of steel products of all kinds, so what exactly are you whining about anyway? During WWII the US produced about 400 million tons of iron _ore_ that would have yielded about 120 million tons of iron. Currently in 4 years the US produces approximately 400 million tons of raw steel alone, plus cast iron, wrought iron, and other iron products, a level considerably higher than that during WWII.
You really need to find some better sources of information before you start bitching and you also need to learn not to take disagreement so personally.
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J. Clarke wrote:

I guess any that use screws and bolts bought from McFeely's or Grainger at 26% markup... about triple the markup on oil... Perhaps we need a windfall profits tax on screws. Oh, wait, the article said the automatic government agreed mark up was 26% but that wasn't enough so they paid 50% instead... I can't wait until Uncle Sam starts buying me my medical care....
Anyway, I was really just poking fun at all the crap we get from China, and the fact the article said Grainger was in trouble for selling stuff to the military that was made in China. Seems everything is made in China these days so if a US tank has a screw or bolt holding it together, it probably came from China, whether Grainger re-packaged it or not...
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Jack Stein wrote:

So do McFeelys and Grainger sell MS or NAS hardware?

I doubt that tanks are held together with fasteners from Grainger. Anything of that nature would made either to a custom design by the tank manufacturer or to an MS or NAS drawing, and Grainger wouldn't be stocking either.
Grainger stuff would typically be used for facilities maintenance--that means keeping the air conditioning in the office working for example.
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I guess it depends which town you are in. If I need something quick, I will try a big box store. But if I want the job done right, with quality fasteners, I go to an industrial fastener store. Any kind of planning on the project, includes a trip to the right kind of store.
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