Screws - particle board vs. construction

In the past, I've always used particle board screws (coarse thread, narrow shift, countersunk head nibbed on underside) for kitchen cabinet case construction. Recently, I've noticed that construction screws are very similar - even identical - and more widely available. Is there any significant difference between the two types that I am missing?
Jim
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Construction screws? Are you talking about dry wall screws? If so, use dry wall screws for drywall, they are typically too lite of a gauge for furniture and they are way too brittle.
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Not drywall screws. Here's a link for construction screws: http://www.jdcopelandsupply.com/construction-screws-bulk-package-6500-screws-p-156.html
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Not drywall screws. Here's a link for construction screws: http://www.jdcopelandsupply.com/construction-screws-bulk-package-6500-screws-p-156.html
Ok, construction screws, hummm.. To tell you the truth, screws purchased from mail order almost always are less expensive and much better quality that what you will find a the Borg. Having said that, I am not at all surprised that you have probably found a less expensive and better quality screw on line. My only concern would be if they are actually a quality screw. You might also look at Mcfeeleys, while a flat head #8 , 1.5" yellow zinc screw will run you about $150 for 5,000, their screws are typically pretty high quality. If you are confident in your source you should be good to go.
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My original question was more to do with quality and functionality than cost. Comparing a Paulin brand construction screw (CS) with a Paulin brand particle board screw (PBS), the differences are almost non-existent. The CS is "dichromate plated" (gold) and has "Saw tooth" threads while the PBs is "plated steel" (silver). Otherwise, I cant see any difference between the two or from the description on the packaging.
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My original question was more to do with quality and functionality than cost. Comparing a Paulin brand construction screw (CS) with a Paulin brand particle board screw (PBS), the differences are almost non-existent. The CS is "dichromate plated" (gold) and has "Saw tooth" threads while the PBs is "plated steel" (silver). Otherwise, I cant see any difference between the two or from the description on the packaging.
Being the same brand, I doubt you would have problems. But to be safe, I'd give them a call and see what they say or buy a small quantity and test them out.
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wrote:

Jim,
I don't believe there is an actual "Construction Screw" per se. It is probably a name that JD Copeland Supply has decided to call these screws.
With that said I agree with the others that they are probably OK. But you may want to test them before you commit to full use.
G.S.
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Perhaps he means decking screws. I would expect those to be more expensive due to the need for corrosion resistance.
--
FF

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wrote:

No, not decking screws, construction screws! Here's another link:
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/967794/shear_strength_of_nails_drywall_screws_amp_construction_screw /
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Hi Jimbo If I use screws the zinc plated construction screws are the ones I use.You can also get them with different coatings one for cedar and one for pressure treated so they do not bleed a black stain.

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Jimbo wrote:

Particle board screws tend to have thin but wide threads (so they "cut in" and hold better in fragile materials like PB and MDF). "Standard" wood screws tend to have narrower threads, but I'm seeing more and more construction screws that look similar to particle board screws.
I've used construction screws in ply/mdf/PB and solid wood. Noncommercial use, but it seems to be holding up fine. I like the Spax and Robertson brands, but haven't tried McFeeleys since I live up in Canada.
Chris
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Since I also live in Canada, I always seem to end up with Paulin screws! Anyway, it seems like construction screws can be used instead of particle board screws. So really its a matter of selection and cost.
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I suggest you try Confirmat? / Conformat? screws. They are not cheap but they are large and very strong and do not split or delaminate plywood when placed in the endgrain. They are best described as a steel threaded dowel. They need a stepped hole and are easiest to drill with an expensive (brittle and easily broken by dropping) drill bit. IIRC they are designed for particle? K3? or MDF? (which I do not use and know nothing about) but IMHO work great with plywood. I especially like them in combination with biscuits and often use the screws instead of clamps. If exposed, I use a plug cutter to fab a solid tapered plug to conceal.
Good luck, YMMV
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Confirmat/Conformat (I've seen both spellings) are good but seems way too expensive for my taste costing at least twice what PB screws cost.
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