screws or nails while building a shed

Hi all,
I started a thread a few days ago about building a shed, but instead of adding this to the tail of that thread I thought I'd start a new thread.
Anyway, for a standard 10x12 shed would you guys suggest using nails or screws? I assume screws are more secure, but I'm not sure. Also if I used nails, what's involved in getting a nailgun? I have a large Craftsman air compressor I can use.
Thanks...
Ringo
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Avoid screws for framing a structure, they have far less shear strength than nails. When the do fail they snap, nails won't. A framing nailer will cost you a few hundred dollars, and will probably be overkill for just a shed. Just buy a nice 22oz Eastwing framing hammer.
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Or buy a used one, after the job, sell it on eBay.
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seconded. --dave

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TaskMule wrote:

My hammer of choice used to be a 24 oz Vaughan but now it is a 28 oz Hart with a nice curvy hickory handle. The Vaughan is used for beating all kinds of stuff, the Hart for framing. Still has its nice aggressive waffle face! Ouch!
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You oughta come and look at mine. LOL
I suggest nails for the floor joist hangers. Palm Nailers are the tool of choice for this task IMHO. I screwed the floor down on to the joists and screwed the wall studs to the sole plate and top plates. Long lag bolts to secure the sole plates through the floor in to the floor joists. Nails for the ceiling joist hangers and nails for the roof decking and shingles. You can also use nails for all the walls and for added strength add hurricane clips to help anchor everything. These are about 50 cents each. I use one on the top and bottoms of the studs on every other stud.
If you opt for a standard framing nail gun, pick the one you like. You can run them on just about any sized compressor. Alternatively the Paslode airless gun is a very nice unit. It is very nice not having to have a compressor and hose following you around. It is great for building fences. Expect to pay about $399 for this gun. Senco builds great guns. As an added thought the better nails for these guns will have a glue coating that melts when shot and helps hold the nail even tighter than a standard nail.
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you can rent a nail gun
Len

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leonard wrote:

Rent? RENT??? Then how would he be able to acquire a new tool?
(Although, I gotta say, buy a framing nailer to put up a little 10x12 shed? or rent one? Crikey. I'd vote for the 22 oz. Estwing hammer like those other two I think. You can't possibly put enough nails into something that small to justify any kind of pneumatic or gunpowder-powered anything, unless you're just swimming in cash, and you already have a great TS, top shelf jointer, big daddy planer, high dollar bandsaw, etc. and are just completely out of more interesting machinery to buy.)
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No kidding. LOL

You are looking at this all wrong. What would it cost to have some one build the shed? That amount saved by doing it yourself justifies the cost of a new tool.
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RE: Subject
I like to screw.
Lew
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Gaud... I guess screwin is OK but I like to nail'em every once in a while too. LOL
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"Leon" writes:

while
Touche.
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On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 05:50:44 GMT, the inscrutable "Lew Hodgett"
Ditto here. I love being able to repair a fence or whatever in ten seconds vs. fighting for 15 minutes to remove stubborn nails while breaking the split board into lebenty pieces, etc.
I framed that screened porch (on the old property in Vista) entirely with screws and it worked really well.
That said, I should reorder from McFeely soon.
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On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 22:49:21 -0500, Silvan

Or you're like me; awaiting an appointment next week with the orthopaedic surgeon to discuss surgery on my right shoulder.
I didn't swing a hammer professionally, so can't blame the problem on that, but the amount of amateur homebuilding I've done can't have helped. It's a twofer problem: repeative motion and shock on the joints.
Rent, or better, borrow a nailer.
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Whether screws or nails are used, for the pressure treated lumber used in the shed ensure that the fasteners are rated for ACQ pressure treatment. These fasteners are available for both hand nailing as well as driving with a pneumatic nailer. The other fasteners not exposed to the weather can be the less expensive bright nails without a coating.
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Nails.
Dave

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Hot dipped galvanized for the pressure treated lumber. Coated deck screw rated for pressure treated lumber for screwing the floor down. Coated sinker nails for the rest.
As was already posted a palm nailer is a great air tool and fairly cheap.
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wrote:

I generally just use nails. For something that small, you don't even really need a nailgun- a hammer would work just fine for you, unless you're really prone to tennis elbow. Screws are probably fine as well, but I've found that I always end up getting the crappy screws, and waste too much time stripping out screw heads. You're also going to want to have a really, really good cordless drill for that many screws, with at least two or three spare batteries and an extra charger. Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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I used nails in mine for the floor joists, the walls, and roof trusses etc. Decking, siding and interior walls etc I used screws. Metal roofing got screws too, w/ rubber grommets and a shot of silicone on each. Grandpa John
Ringo Langly wrote:

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