Screw question

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I usually use drywall screws from home depot. I want to order some 'good' screws from McFeeleys. What kind do you buy for indoor furniture? Black oxide? Unplated dry lube? Black phosphate?
Confused...
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Brian
www.garagewoodworks.com
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"Garage_Woodworks" wrote:

Since most of what I've done is marine related, I standardized on S/S a long time ago.
Found that coarse thread, self tapping, sheet metal screws do a great job in wood, so that's what I use and haven't looked back.
Buy full boxes from Jamestown Distributors, so the cost isn't too bad.
BTW, do use some el-cheapo deck screws from H/D, strictly for temp work such as holding plywood in position while fiberglass is applied. Screws are then removed and trashed.
Have fun.
Lew
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As a neophyte, what makes the Home Depot Deck Screws so bad relative to McFeely's? - Less strong/more brittle? - Poorer coating for corrosion resistance? (I am comparing here to other coated screws not to the gold standard of SS) - Poorer head design? (Phillips vs. Square Drive) - Worse thread design? - All of the above?
I imagine many will say all-of-the-above but since I have (mistakenly) invested already in a full range of HD deck screws in multiple sizes and colors, I would like to understand the limitations better before I chuck them or relegate them to just temporary uses.
Thanks
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blueman wrote:
.. snip

Deck screws, you are probably alright. Their other wood screws, at least in my experience fall under the less strong/more brittle category. I could not get a screw, even with a pilot hole, to drive home without snapping 80% of the time. I finally wound up throwing any of those HD screws away, it just wasn't worth the hassle, especially after finding McFeeley's.
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If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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"blueman" wrote:

Metallurgy.
Good metallurgy is like good cooking, they both take time and practice to learn, and good ingredients to get good results.
Lowes & H/D are using sources from offshore who have not yet developed good in house metallurgy YET.
They will get there, it will just take time.
Mean while the stuff is not very good.
BTW, there are no longer any US fastener manufacturers, it's all offshore.
It's just some countries have better metallurgy and quality control.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I keep seeing this assertion. Just because you can't find US fasteners at Home Depot don't assume that there are no manufacturers. Try Alcoa, Penn Engineering, and SPS for three.

The Chinese can make just about anything you want (remember, they are quite capable of making nuclear weapons and manned spacecraft), but they are going to make exactly what the contract specifies. If it doesn't specify either the metallurgy or the required performance then they will use the cheapest material they can get, and if the head comes off going in, well, you didn't say it had to be driveable.
By the way, I don't know where the fasteners I pulled out of my garage a few weeks ago came from, but they were going on 40 years old and the heads pulled off of them just as handily as they do off the latest Home Depot Chinese stuff.
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Should I assume, then, that the toy contracts specified lead paint, and the dog food components specified ethelene glycol?
Glen
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just that they know so much that isn't so."
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You should assume that the company that gave the specifications did not indicate all information pertinent for the manufacture of the product. Specs probably called for "paint" not the type of paint and or they did not indicate which filler to use in the dog food, although I would believe that may have been an actual mistake like the bottled drinking water from France mistakenly having Benzene in it. You have to tell them "everything" not just the basic perimeters. Remember that breaking the word "ass u me" up is what happens if you assume that the manufacturer can read your mind if you do not indicate "exactly" what you want.
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Benzene is a natural contaminant of Vichy water.
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FF

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Glen wrote:

Did the contract say "no lead paint"? Did it say "no ethylene glycol"?

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Whereas it might be true that the contract was vague on the paint I don't think that the spec for dog food included ethylene glycol, nor should one assume a need to specifically bar poison in a per food contract.
However it is not unlikely that each contract specified certain standards, such as thos promulgated by the ASTM or the CPSC, for each.
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Softer
Have not witnessed a problem there.

They are actually a combination of phillips and square drive, sorta. You can use a phillips or square drive on thise deck scresa as well as some of the McFeeleys screws.

Have not witnessed.

The biggest difference is that the deck screws are pretty much designed to be used one time. Higher quality screws similar to McFeeleys screws can be used over and over. My experience with the Borg deck screws it that they can cam out and the bit can ruin the head much like the typical low quality screw. The square drive makes Philips combination makes this less likely to happen but if the bit slips it usually will damage the head. With the higher quality screws the bit will typically slip out many many times be for any significant damage is done. The Borg deck screws are simply too soft to hold up for repeated usage.
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These are my favorite for indoor furniture:
http://www.mcfeelys.com/flathead-yellow-zinc
Max
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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

For general use, I use their dry lube square drive. Plus brass plated for cabinet hinges.     j4
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I like the yellow zinc plated for general furniture work.
You're going to like those screws. No tapered threads and very easy to drive without slips and cam-out.
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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

Why confused if corrosion isn't a problem? If the fastener won't show the finish is immaterial. If it shows, get the color you want.
One caveat: don't use steel screws (other than SS) in oak (or Western red cedar). Brass or bronze are fine, bronze is stronger. With either, first fasten with a steel screw then remove it and replace with the non-corroding one.
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dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

Man, I love that tip. Had never thought of it before, but it just makes so much sense. I'm building something in cedar right now, and will be using brass screws, but was going to be careful and take tons of time with them. Now with your idea I can pre-set them with steel. Thanks!
Tanus
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"Tanus" wrote:

Brass is very weak.
Bronze is stronger and will look better over time, especially for exterior work.
A little more costly, but not that much, IMHO.
Lew
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That's one of those weird things - bronze is copper and tin, brass is copper and zinc. Zinc is harder than tin, but bronze is harder than brass.
What's even more interesting is the theory about why there was a transition from the Bronze to the Iron Age. I had always thought that iron was a tougher material for making implements, but it seems that the transition was due to problems with trade making it tough to get the requisite base metals to make bronze together in the same place. Kind of weird to think that interrupted trade routes set us back in an area of such primary importance.
R
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Forget presetting. I really like Stainless Steel in cedar. This guy is local to me: <http://www.maxbaldwin.com/
After seeing him use hundreds of thousands of screws, I'm convinced.
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