scrapers

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anyone worked much with scrapers? I've seen David Marks using them for everything, and I'd like to get some feedback from 'real' people on their use. Was thinking of picking one up this week when I trek over to Highland.
One reason I'd like to play with them is I've been having huge tearouts with my planes recently. Probably because I dont have them tuned well, I know :(
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I use them. They do work. David uses hand scrapers mostly. There are also cabinet scrapers like the Stanley #80 and #12 and scraper planes like the #112, #212, and #85.
--
Ross
www.myoldtools.com
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Marks uses the Stanley #80 almost as much as the hand scraper. I haven't gotten a good feel for the method to his scraping madness, though... I.e. when he's chosing the #80 over the hand scraper and vice versa.
Scraping and hand planing is something I need to read up on. I have a hand scraper and burnisher, but that's it. The more I watch Marks, the more I realize I should broaden my horizons. :-)
Brian.

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I recently put a Hock blade on my 80 (a Christmas present from SWMBO) an now that is one fine machine for taking wispy little curlies.
Glen

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I have a good size blister on my right thumb right now from scraping this weekend.
I highly recommend the Veritas Variable Burnisher (Lee Valley). Until I got mine, I never really got a good edge.
Montyhp

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Montyhp wrote:

If you like the Veritas Variable Burnisher you're going to love their card scraper holder thing-a-majig. Turn a knob to flex the card scaper as much as you want and no more thumb cramps or blisters.
charlie b
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brought forth from the murky depths:

Cotton gardening gloves work well to keep scrapers from warming your fingers too much, charlie.
======================================================== The Titanic. The Hindenburg. + http://www.diversify.com The Clintons. + Website & Graphic Design ========================================================
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I've got one, but I can't seem to control it. I'd rather just wrap duct tape around my thumbs.
Montyhp

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I have the card scraper holder also and find it mostl a nuisance.. As for the 'hot thumb' problem take a couple of the flexible refrig magnets you get w advertising on them and attach to back. Greatly extends time b4 heat gets to you.
On Wed, 7 Jan 2004 20:43:14 -0500, "Montyhp" <montyhp at yahoo.com> wrote:

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I just started using one. I haven't gotten my technique down for creating the bur. The bur that I am creating doesn't last very long, but I need practice. It seems to be a real sandpaper saver.

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I have a Stanley #80, which I use for crotch/strange grain. I do have a set of hand scrapers and have filed and burnished, I even tried putting a 45 degree edge on the straight....I also would love to know how he (Marks) gets such large shavings while hand scraping. I did find that after freehand sharpening on the 1" belt sander at 45 deg. I was able to increase the size of the shavings, but not substantially....:-(

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It may depend on the wood. With straight-grained poplar I can make shavings the length of the board with a block plane--not something I can do on most other woods. I haven't tried to make long shaving with a scraper.
It is also possible to tune a scraper. WIth a big 15 degree hook you can remove wood fast or with a fine 5 degree burr you can just take the bumps and sags off a finished surface.
I found that out quite by accident when I was trying to remove all the paint from a cabinet and discovered that I was just leveling the surface on the topcoat the way the scraper was burnished.
--
FF

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Scrapers are awesome. I find I can scrape with or against the grain, just don't try to scrape across the grain.
I rarely use sand paper as I find that the finish left by a scraper, or well tuned smoothing plane cannot be improved upon.
The whole trick is in the burr. It takes very little pressure with a burnisher to create a good burr. Preparing the scraper before drawing the burr is important. You need to make sure that the face and edge of the scraper are very smooth and square before drawing the burr. A very small burr creates very nice shavings.
Good luck.

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On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 01:46:56 GMT, tmbg wrote:

I've got a number of scrapers. Card scrapers, a Stanley #80 & LN #112.
The card scrapers I use for small touch up jobs, the Stanley for scraping off glue from panels and such like and the LN instead of a ROS/sandpaper and clouds of choking dust.
Sandpaper's for peasants ;)
I'd get your planes tuned-up first though - it will mean less work in the long run. Whilst you're at the hardware shop, buy some silicon carbide paper and a piece of glass & Scary Sharp them.
--

Frank

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On Tue, 6 Jan 2004 11:10:23 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@SPAMLESSesperance-linux.co.uk (Frank Shute) wrote:

I find that a stiff scrubbing brush and carbolic soap are adequate for my peasants. Perhaps your estate is on a clay soil, and your serfs get dirtier ?
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On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 03:09:35 +0000, Andy Dingley wrote:

Next time I'll try your carbolic/scrubbing brush method. Thinking about it, sandpaper's too good for them ;)
The hassles of being an evil land-owning toff ....
</whinge>
-
Frank (aka "the Lord")
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All the time.

Before you go, familiarize yourself with scraper sharpening methods. <http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/w00007.asp
Make sure you have everything you need, pick up what you don't.
A dull scraper will turn off a new user in seconds.
Barry
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"B a r r y B u r k e J r ." wrote:

As Barry says, learn to sharpen them. I've just got to the point that I can properly get a good burr. It only takes about two minutes to sharpen all 8 edges on a flat scraper now. At first I was trying too hard to get it sharp but now that I have learned the subtle technique it's simple. I agree that if you don't persist and reach this level where you can sharpen them quick, you will give up.
-Bruce

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They work well but aren't for taking off a lot of material. Unfortunately for you they also need "tuning".
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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I have them located all over my shop. I'm constantly honing them. The veritas burnisher works very nicely. Once you have them, you will try to figure out how you got along without them. Make sure to get the goose neck shaped one also. It works very nice smoothing coves. SH
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