Scraper Plane Edge Prep


I recently acquired a Stanley #12. To make a long story short, I proceeded to butcher the scraper edge, and will need to burnish a new burr from scratch.
Here's what I THINK I should do (via google and books). Please let me know where I've gone astray.
1. Flatten the back side w/ sand paper, from 60 - 600 grit. [There currently is no burr.]
2. Sharpen the bevel side, as above, w/a homemade jig at 45 degrees. [How sharp? Scary sharp like a plane iron?]
3. Lay the scraper blade flat, burnish the back side with a piece of round tool steel (I'll use the side of a hole punch).
4. Put the blade in a vise and turn the burr with progressively increasing angles to about 75 degrees. [How much burr should I expect when I'm done? 1/64"? 1/16"?]
When the scraper goes dull, do I need to repear all of these steps (assuming they're correct), or is there a way to resharpen the edge once or twice before the full-blown re-working?
Thanks for any and all help!
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this from leevalley.com. it was a pop up window so I couldn't give you the exact link: " Sharpening the scraping blade is the most critical and difficult part of learning to use a scraping plane. Understanding how a scraper cuts (see above) and knowing what a properly burnished cutting edge looks and feels like are the key concerns when learning how to sharpen the blade.
The bevel angle on the blade is ground at 45, rather than square as found on card (cabinet) scrapers. This makes it easy to burnish or deform the metal of the bevel into a relatively aggressive burr or hook.
The burnishing angle should be about 15. An angle of 20 or more will result in too much scraping and not enough cutting (producing dust, not shavings). The higher angle also increases the likelihood of blade chatter. Smaller angles (closer to horizontal) may not cut at all as no cutting edge is introduced to the wood, or there may be no relief angle and the blade will just slide along the surface of the workpiece.
Step 1 Preparation: This step is not necessary with a new blade. Before you start honing, the blade should be shaped to maintain a straight cutting edge and a 45 bevel. Hold the blade in a vise and use a 6" or 8" bastard cut mill file to prepare the blade. Check the bevel periodically with a straightedge and a protractor (or sliding bevel set to 45) as you work. The Veritas Jointer/Edger (05M07.01) is ideal for this process. A bench-top belt sander with an 80x or 120x abrasive belt may also be used for this step.
Step 2 Honing: Start with an 800x or 1000x stone to remove the marks from filing. Either an oil stone or water stone is suitable. Hold the blade as shown in Figure 3 with the bevel flat against the stone. Stroke it back and forth, covering the whole stone. Check the bevel often to evaluate your progress. Continue until all file marks are gone. As shown in Figure 4, lap the face of the blade near the cutting edge to achieve the same finish as on the bevel. A sharp edge can only be achieved by creating two intersecting surfaces honed to the same degree. Using the same technique, transfer to a 4000x water stone or hard Arkansas oil stone to finish honing. The Veritas Power Sharpener or a bench-top belt sander with 320x (40) followed by 1200x (9) abrasive will provide the same results a bit faster.
     Figure 3: Honing.      Figure 4: Lapping.
When sharpening a thick blade, we recommend that you round the corners of the blade to ensure they do not leave corner digs in the workpiece. (You may also do so on a thin blade, but it is unnecessary if you are going to bow the blade; see Bow Adjustment below). This is best accomplished by creating a small round at each end of the cutting edge as shown in Figure 5 when first preparing the bevel with a file or belt sander. Work the rounded corners as well as the cutting edge at each successive stage of honing.
Figure 5: Rounding the corners of the blade.
Step 3 Burnishing: With the blade held firmly in a vise, use a burnisher (the Veritas Tri-Burnisher 05K32.01 is well suited) to create a hook as shown in Figure 6. Use three or four even firm strokes across the entire edge of the blade at the same angle as the bevel. Raise the burnisher handle slightly and take three or four more strokes. Finish by taking three or four strokes with the burnisher 15 from horizontal as shown in Figure 6. The first few times you do this, sight against a reference tool such as a sliding bevel or engineers protractor set to the desired angle.
Note: Before burnishing, touch your fingertip to the side of your nose or behind your ear (two natural oil sources) and transfer that minute amount of oil to the blade. It reduces friction and avoids galling.
Toothed Blade Note: Sharpen and hone only the 45 bevel. DO NOT hone the face of the toothed blade, or you will damage the sharp points that actually do the cutting.
Figure 6: Burnishing.
Blade Adjustment
With the blade prepared you are now ready to set up the plane. A blade burnished with a 15 angle will require setting the adjustable frog to about 5 forward of vertical using the frog adjustment wheels (see Figure 7). However, if your burnishing technique produces an angle other than 15, you will have to determine the ideal frog setting. Use the scraping plane blade like a hand scraper to find the angle that produces the smoothest scraping action. Set the frog angle to approximately the same angle you established with hand scraping. Ensure that the blade bow thumbscrew is backed off such that it does not protrude beyond the frog face. Set the scraping plane on a smooth, flat and clean work surface. Insert the blade with the bevel facing the rear of the plane and the cutting edge resting on the work surface. Lightly hold the blade in place against the frog and tighten the lever cap knob (a quarter turn should be ample do not overtighten) to secure the blade. The blade will now be flush with the sole.
To advance the blade, pick up the plane and pivot the frog forward 1/2 or so. Just loosening the rear adjustment wheel and retightening the front wheel may provide enough movement. As the blade pivots forward, the cutting edge drops below the sole. Another technique you can use to set the initial blade projection is to place a single sheet of paper under the toe of the plane and set the cutting edge of the blade so that it is just resting on the work surface. You should not have to adjust the frog forward if you use this technique. Either way, the scraping plane is now ready for use. Take a few quick test cuts and fine tune the cut as required.
As the hook on the blade wears, you can continue to pivot the blade forward to re-establish the cutting action. Again, a shift of only 1/2 or so may be all that is required. When making larger changes to the blade angle, be sure to reset the blade flush with the bottom to avoid moving the cutting edge too far below the sole of the plane. You may continue to adjust the blade forward to about 25 or so. At this point, if the plane is no longer producing shavings, the blade must be resharpened and the frog adjusted back to the 5 starting point. "
I think the 600 grit is WAAAY to low a grit. You might have to adjust some of the parameters for use with a Stanley, but I found that if I deviate a few degrees from the instructions I get a lot of chatter.
Dave
B_Lerner wrote:

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That's the instructions that come with the LV scraper plane. I'm sure most of it applies to all scrapers, but I don't know just how much only applies to the Lee Valley blade. I think it's much thicker than the blades that came with the standard Stanly 12. Beveling to 45 degrees might not be the best way with the Stanley.
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A lot of burnishing problems can be traced to a poor burnishing tool. The "side of a hole punch" is to soft. Can you file the punch? If so, it's too soft. Get a good burnishing tool.

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60-80-100-120-180 will all leave the cuts too deep, 220 does fine as a starter unless the shape of the metal is really crude, scraper blade is thin, not a chisel.
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Alex
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Hi,
Wish I had a Stanley 12 :-)
What works for me on a Stanley 80: 1. Flatten backside with Duostone followed by waterstone (first time only) 2. Sharpen 45 degree bevel with same. I use a similar procedure as a plane blade, except no secondary bevel. For most of what I do, I don't fiddle with the finest grit on the bevel side. YMMV. 3. Burnish the hook with 2-3 pretty gentle passes, maybe at about 20 degrees off the bevel. It's easy to roll the hook on a plane scraper blade -- it doesn't take much pressure and you don't want to overwork it. It's a much gentler deal than I use for a card scraper. You'll just barely feel the burr when you're done (certainly 1/16" would be way too much).
I am sure there are many of methods. This is just one that works for me.
Cheers, Nate
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when Nate Perkins

They're quite different tools. The #80 is a holder for a fairly normal cabinet scraper, with a square edge. The #12 may have a 45 edge to the scraper (although not always). These 45 scrapers are softer, have a larger hook, and IMHE are very easy to sharpen in comparison. I'm fussy about carefully sharpening and burnishing cabinet scrapers, but quite slapdash in doing those for my #12 or #112. I very rarely stone the bevel - just a 1000 grit stone to take any nicks out of the edge.
As a general tool, I prefer the #112 to the #12. The handles make it more controllable to hold it against chattering. The #12 and its "broomhandle" handle is OK over a short pass where you can keep your weight directly over it, but if you have to reach far away from your body for a long pass then you can't hold it down so well and it tends to chatter.
I recommend buying a good burnisher. They're cheap enough and having a real handle will save your fingers and knuckles.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Hi Andy,
The Stanley 80 blade does not have a squre edge; it has a 45 degree bevel on it ... unless mine is defective ;-P
Regards, Nate
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Nate Perkins"

Hmmm - I've got two, both with square edges. Now one's old, but I thought the other was new-in-box when I got it. Certainly how I sharpen them they're square edges with hooks.
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wrote:

Hi Andy,
That's strange. Mine's got the 45 bevel, and Patrick's Blood and Gore says it's standard on the 80. It's hard to imagine how you'd get the burr facing the right way without the bevel, given that the blade bed angle is fixed.
I agree with all your previous comments re the overall superiority of the no 12, though. Someday I'd like to get one of those. Of course I'd also like one of the Lie Nielsen hand beaders, too (I saw you had recommended those when I was comparing and searching the wreck archives).
Regards, Nate
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 08:33:32 GMT, Nate Perkins

The old Stanley #66 is still fairly common. Get one with both fences, but you can make cutters up as you need them. You need the curved fence because it's often easier to use a moulding plane on the straight stuff, but the #66 really shines on shallow curves (in a plane, not on the curved edge).
I've even seen a guy making pie crust tables with a #66 and a home-made "button" fence. He use it to rough the scalloping out equally to size on each piece, then did the final trim with a gouge.
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I once watched a video on tv of an old fellow making a piece of furniture, I believe it was a large chest of some kind. When he was done with building it he hand beaded it with a carving chisel and mallet, probably a small size gouge or "V" but it was a chisel tool. I wish I knew what the video is named, old by now. He did this perfect work, perfectly and casually. Not knocking a beader but that is what I call serious "skill"!
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