Scraper

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Flatten both sides with water stone. Ok. check Flatten and polish edge with water stone. Ok. check Roll the burr with newly purchased burnisher. Ok. check.
Feel burr with thumb. Ahhh, nice burr!
Practice scrape on some pine. DUST. Change angle and scrape again. DUST.
Ahhhh Crap. PPPPFFFFFFTTTTTT!!!!!!
Throw scraper across the workshop. Ok. check!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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How well does the scraper work now that you put a few nicks in it?
Dave
stoutman wrote:

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Scrapers and pine aren't the best of combinations. Try some hardwood. Cherry and maple work pretty well. Walnut OK. Oak varies. Softwoods generally suck.
Patriarch
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Ah, I didn't know that. Thanks. I was expecting nice shavings like you see in the magazines, but.... DUST.
I will try some maple.

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Fortunately, scrapers work best on softwood where you need them most - knots and such which are hard to sand and twice as gummy. Though more of an art than science on softwood, if you press less - tough when you're getting bad results for great effort - and push more, your chances are good to smooth out the tough areas.
You may want to tune up a smoother - best of all on soft wood
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Try it on harder wood. I find my scraper doesn't work as well on soft woods. Course, it might just be me.....
Getting the burr right and repeatable is an epiphany. Creating lace shavings with it is poetry.... and NO sanding dust.... and it's quiet....
If you want to go pick that scraper up, here's what I do.
The first steps (honing) are essentially the same (start with a mill file, diamond vs water, blah, blah blah). How do you roll the burr? burnisher at 90 to the edge? I've found that holding it about 5 deg off of 90 with the tip slightly leading the handle (think of this as 5 deg off of 90 horizontally and the tip leading by 5deg as well), then start the stroke at the tip and finish at the handle, while maintaing the angles. Talkes a little practice, but it's the best method I've found.
Of course, if all this fails, the one good thing about a dull scraper is that it doens't take up much room in the shop (unlike some of those other tool purchases [roto-zip, detail sander, etc, etc......])
Joe C.

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Thanks for the tips. I'm gonna give maple a go!
Thanks

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As others have said, try it on hardwood. Then the only other thing I can say is that you are trying too hard! I am fairly lazy, so to put a nice edge on my el-cheapo Stanley scraper I use a fine belt on my PC belt sander and hold the scraper the long way against the belt. Then I roll the edge with whatever screwdriver is around. Nice fine curls every time! Greg
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Man o' man - I *know* what you're going through. I'm thinking of starting a business in Presharpened Disposable Scrapers just for idiots like me...
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presharpened scrapers!! good ideal. but if making your own is hard wook, making enough to sell will be a pain.... but i'll let you start making some for me!!! c'ya larry

just
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I found your problem. Pine doesn't scrape for crap.

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stoutman wrote:

Scrapers don't really work on softwoods. <G>
Barry
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Skip the waterstone. I like waterstones, but for scrapers I use a harder oil or arkansas. Waterstones groove too easily if you work this narrow edge across them.

Roll and turn. Roll the first burr _along_ the burnisher (parallel to the main surface) and then turn it over by about 90 to stick out sideways. This is much easier to produce a usefully sized burr.

You can't scrape soft softwoods. Try some oak instead.
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I use a waterstone that has 1000 grit on one side and 6000 on the other. The interesting thing is that the 1000 side is about 3/4" thick and the 6000 is 1/4" thick. This gives you the side of the 1000 side specially designed for things like this that you wouldn't want on the main part of the stone. Also works great for plane cap irons.
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spake:

OK, fine. Send it to me. I'll get 'er working...and keep it. Got my address?
------------------------------------------ Do the voices in my head bother you? ------------------------------------------ http://diversify.com Full-Service Web Development
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It's kinda funny with the scraper business. I spent hours and hours doing the thing "right" just like what you did, and I got nowhere. Then, about the point I almost gave up, I saw some shavings!!
Since then, when I got lazy, I just put the scraper on the vice and file it away w/o worrying that it's nice and polished. Then I just pass a cheap ($2) engine push rod (not even a true "burnisher") over it a few more times and, wham, got good shavings.
I think it's like learning how to bike. Once you "learned", you can almost throw the theory away. The hard part is to get to that point.
Good luck!
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That's what I use, too. It may not be a "true burnisher" but it's every bit as good as one - that's some danged hard steel. Some day, I'll get around to making a nice handle for it on the lathe...
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

There's one in my toolbox, too, but it came with a caution: Don't cut it, because it _might_ be one of the sodium-filled ones.
So it has no handle. And works pretty well, when I do.
Patriarch
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On Tue, 17 May 2005 14:29:40 -0500, Patriarch

Exhausts only. So if it's an inlet, it won't be filled.
Anyway, what's the big deal about cutting a sodium-filled valve open ? Just hacksaw it.
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I also use a pushrod for scraper burnishing. I have several store bought burnishers that are too soft to roll the edge on hard scrapers. An additional plus for pushrods is that they are long enough to keep fingers away from the wire edge of the scraper. Thinking of getting my thumb sliced during burnishing makes my skin crawl.
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