SCMS question.

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C'mon Robatoy.... They *do* tell you to use a push stick. LOL

I was at the lumber yard picking up some 14' x 18" 5/4 mahogany (drive-by) but needed them to crosscut it to get it into the van. Guy puts it on the radical harm saw, begins to cut it when it binds, the carriage punches him in the chest and knocks him 7' backwards, arse over teakettle into a stack of pallets. That was all the reason I ever needed not to own one. Yes, I know some care in setup would've avoided it, but still......
jc
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HE was lucky.
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Robatoy wrote:

No, sounds like he was dumb...
I had only the RAS for a stationary piece of equipment for about the first 5 years; it and only a jointer for about 5 more before anything else. Never a problem--respect it, be careful and it's absolutely no more dangerous than any other woodworking tool...
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Not standing directly in front of the saw/motor might have helped a bit...
I've seen so many stupid things done with saws at lumber yards that I'm amazed that any of those folks still own their own hands..
Best one I've seen so far was the guy that brought our plywood to the panel saw on a fork lift and was lining up the 1st cut when the fork lift decided that since he didn't bother to set the brake, it would come visit him.. he got out of the way, but they were instantly in the market for a new panel saw..
mac
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LOL..... Yeah, I have done it many times, But no longer.
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Robatoy wrote:

And what is it that makes a RAS more dangerous than a table saw? I can remember my old man getting some really scary kickbacks on his table saw. My RAS hasn't kicked back on me since a bought it a carbide blade a dozen years ago. Both RAS and table saw are very dangerous and I treat both of them with a whole lot of respect.
David Starr
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Hell yes... that's why I paid the whopping $50 for it and immediately ordered an anti-kickback setup for it for another $65...
The table and fence are 6' long and when ripping long boards it's much more stable that my TS.. Also, I'm much more out of the way of possible kickback on the RAS than the TS.. Not sure about a ball bearing sled.. I guess I'm too cheap for one of those.. lol
I've seen some really scary pictures here of folks stopping boards with their bodies when using a TS... when I'm ripping with the RAS, it's "target area" is to my left, about 2 feet from me... Much safer that on the TS, IMO...

mac
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Dave wrote:

An SCMS won't rip, it just does crosscuts. For crosscuts, you can do 'em with a hand saw, a power saw is just a luxury. But a long rip cut, especially in 2" stock, is ultra tedious with a hand saw. I'd be reluctant to trade a radial arm saw for a SCMS, the RAS will do all the crosscuts a SCMS will do, and a lot more that the SCMS cannot do. All my projects require ripping stock to width, wood never comes from the lumber yard in the width I need.
David Starr
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David Starr wrote:

Try crosscutting a dozen pieces with a compound miter using a handsaw and getting them all the same.
While the radial saw will do any cut that a SCMS will do, the SCMS, if it's a good one, is a lot less finicky about tuning.
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J. Clarke wrote: ...

And the same could be said simply reversing the two...
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dpb wrote:

Not really. A radial arm saw has more degrees of freedom and a larger range of motion, hence more attention to alignment is required. That's the price you pay to have a tool with greater capability.
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J. Clarke wrote:

"If it's a good one" is the operative phrase here...
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J. Clarke wrote:

Well, then you get into a multi thousand dollar industrial tool that needs a crew and a hoist to deliver vs something that one person can toss into the back seat of a car.
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I hear that... When I was living in the states and my shop was the neighborhood gathering spot, I'd always catch someone leaning on the RAS table... there goes the tuning again.. *sigh*
mac
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mac davis wrote:

Yeah, that's one thing that's bugged me about mine--the table being held in alignment by friction. IOne of these days I've got to do something about that.

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I think I'm about to... lol
A friend talked me into NOT selling the RAS and is drawing up plans for a new table and fence that will have solid, allen screw adjustable, supports and things.. Don't know the specifics, but sounds promising.. He said it would be "infinitely adjustable" and keep in tune.. I guess now I'm going to have take the covers off and clean/adjust/oil the rollers on the arm..
It might also help that everything but the lathes and band saw are out of the shop and in the carport now, so less chance of visitors leaning or leaving coffee rings on it..
mac
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Again, I can't speak for a SCMS, but having both a RAS and a CMS, if I'm looking for repeated cuts to length, I'll use the CMS every time, unless the stock is too wide for it..
mac
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J. Clarke wrote:

No contest. I use my RAS for all my crosscuts too. The power tool does better cuts than I can do by hand. The point is, a power saw that won't rip leaves you ripping by hand. Given the choice of doing all my rips by hand or all my crosscuts by hand, I'll take the crosscuts, and do the rips with a power saw. Not having the bucks or the floor space for a whole lot of tools, I think a RAS or a table saw is a better deal than a chop saw/SCMS 'cause the one tool can both crosscut and rip. The chop saw/SCMS is cross cut only. Notice that house framers will bring both a SCMS and a table saw to the job so as to be able both rip and crosscut.

Finicky? A good RAS (in my case a second hand 1960's Craftsman) stays in alignment for a long long time. I slap a square on the occasional fresh cut just to be sure the tool is still cutting square, but I only pull out the Allen wrenches and adjust my RAS maybe once a year, when the square tells me I have a problem.
David Starr
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"David Starr" wrote

My Craftsman RAS is about the same age. I check it any time I'm starting on an important project but my experience is that it only needs tweaking about every 2 years. I should add, though, that I only use it for 90 degree cuts.
Max
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Max wrote:

Surely the great majority of my cuts are plain crosscuts, I don't do all that many miters. Last picture frame I cut on it was many years ago. But I can set the tool to rip, or set the blade horizontal for grooving or molding head work, and have the autostops get the tool back to crosscut position and cutting square again. And yeah, I too put a square on a test cut before cutting that nice fresh wood for that new project. Measure twice, cut once....
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