Scarf joint

I've got to join some 1x8 mahogany to "make them longer" for converting a full size bed into a queen size. (That's a different issue.)
I know how to make a scarf joint but am not sure on the angle other than the more surface the better. From a realistic point it must be some where between 45 degrees and 10 degrees or so. There must be a point ofdiminishing returns where little strength is gained for a shallower angle.
There are lots of sites from Google, but I have not foune one that gives an idea of the angle strength relationship.
Thanks
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in news:sc9hm4lb3ha1pd1jc2aq0ehr2ngboqtgma@ 4ax.com:

I think in boatbuilding scarph joints are traditionally around 8:1 length to thickness, or about 7 degrees; the joints are cut with a plane, the boards stacked on the workbench and offset. That is, offset the ends of the boards 8 inches, make a mark 8 inches from the end of the upper board, and plane the angle on both boards at once. If it's strong enough to trust to keep you from drowning, it's probably strong enough for a bed frame.
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On Jan 10, 8:47 am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

A scarf joint is not the strongest joint out there, and would not be my first or choice for extending a bed frame unless you have a rigid box spring. I'd also be concerned about the look of the exposed joint - will it be covered?
http://www.traditionaltools.us/cms/index.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=239 poke around on that site a bit for more on scarf joints.
R
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