SawStop Test

Page 1 of 4  
THE TEST: SawStop provided us with a demo cartridge and we tested the SawStop on Thursday, January 13th.
I cut a variety of materials such as: wood, plywood, melamine, acrylic, mdf. etc. I enabled the bypass and cut aluminum, green treated and stapled pine. When in bypass mode you will get a code in flashing lights indicating whether the SawStop would have triggered. The lights indicated that the SawStop WOULD NOT have been triggered by cutting the green treated or the stapled pine, so I proceeded to cut them with the SawStop on.
I then got out the drumsticks and cut one in bypass mode. It's amazing how easy it is to cut through a drumstick, pretty gory and except for the lack of blood, not unlike a shop accident. I've always thought of doing this during shop orientations, but decided that it could encourage sophomoric actions (the last thing they need is encouragement).
I'd been asked by some rec.woodworkers to push the stock rapidly into the blade in order to get an idea how much damage would be done in the case of a slip or similar accident.
So to test the SawStop I jammed the drumstick into the blade nearly as fast is I could, the blade promptly disappeared and with virtually no resistance I proceeded to IMPALE the chicken leg onto the riving knife (oh the shame).
RESULTS: SawStop works: the blade definitely stopped and definitely dropped (observers indicated that this happened too fast to discern). Since the drumstick was impaled on the riving knife, I have NO IDEA, how much damage the drumstick sustained from the blade before it's encounter with the riving knife. As you can imagine this was a little embarrassing. Here we've spent $6000 on saws that "save fingers", and I've got a chicken leg skewered by a chunk of steel, not so impressive.
Coincidentally, the SawStop went off again the first time we tilted the blade as we had neglected to provide adequate clearance for the aluminum fence on the sliding table. DOH!!! Steven and/or David: any chance of getting a replacement brake cartridge for our whoops? Again observers were dumbfounded. Results: a tiny nick on the crosscutting fence.
I was expecting a significant jolt/vibration/lurch of the saw when the SawStop was triggered, but aside from a solid THUD and the "disappearance" of blade, there are little dramatics.
MORE IMPRESSIONS My initial impressions (inserted below) are still pretty valid.
These are very nice saws. They are smooth, quiet, and basically a pleasure to use, definitely comparable+ to a PM66. To date our students have had few problems making the switch from the unisaws. The riving knife is great!: easy to change, never in the way and effectively keeps stock going in a straight line. I sanded the gloss off of the extension tables and they are ok now. After 15-20 brake cartridge changes it is pretty second nature (this is just an issue of learning where the "locating pins" are). Arbor nuts/washers drop directly into the hose attached to the "dust shroud" we have enough suction to move the nuts to the most inaccessible part of the DC pipe. I suppose it's time for an access port. We LOVE the paddle switch, a machine has never been so easy to shut off. The "power disconnect switch" however is on the bottom back corner of the left side of the cabinet and is a pain to get to with the sliding table attached to the saw, oh well.
Now that SawStops are in service, I suspect it won't be long before Delta/Jet/Grizzly get sued (and lose) because they failed to provide such a system. Perhaps they will be beating a path to SawStop for licensing sooner rather than later. Let the market decide I suppose, should be interesting to watch.
--



INITIAL IMPRESSIONS
quality -
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's too bad. Kind of defeats the whole purpose of a test.

Was this while it was running, or off? If the latter, why would it trigger if the saw isn't running?

How much are these things?

Yeah, there's probably some litigious bastard who would do such a thing. Pity, that. Especially when I still couldn't buy a saw from SawStop today if I wanted to (but I can pre-order, same as years ago).

I'm not holding my breat. I'd like to see a good test, though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


If the bone was not damaged the results were good as the riving knife should not have removed any bone material.
.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

No, the pity is that they were too cheap to put a safety device on their machines that provides better safety than anything that has ever been offered. But you keep believing that your safety is on equal par with their ability to make a profit...NOT!

Guess if you had shown some nuts and stepped up and ordered one "years ago" you would have it by now, huh?

Why, so you can piss and moan some more?
--
Ted Harris
http://www.tedharris.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
typed:

their
I'd say the SawStop makes a very modest improvement over existing safety technology, i.e. the blade guard.

ago"
Why does someone have to "show some nuts" to buy a table saw? Not everyone is willing to wait a couple of years to get a saw. I just went to their web site. Guess what! I can place a non-binding preorder right now! Wheeeeee!
todd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ted, you are talking to a brick wall. Dave is one of those type people that makes a statement and stands by it come hell or high water, right or wrong. The fact that the product works past the proof that he wanted to see, the fact that the product is not Vaporware, and the fact that the product is shipping and the owners are happy with the purchased over all will not change his mind. He will continue to look the other way and deny the SawStop's existence. He now complains because he did not get in line to start with and has to wait his turn to get a Saw Stop saw. You know the type.
typed:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And still can only be pre-ordered. Yes, Ted, we've been down this road before.

I never said such a thing. It's an interesting concept, and it might even work. But threatening a lawsuit on people who don't use something that isn't able to be ordered is a bit stupid.


Hard to say, Ted. Why the personal insult? Have they shipped more than the first batch of demo units yet?

Because it might actually have some merit, and if I could actually buy one of the damn things, if it works, I might do so. But not if they continue blowing smoke and taking a lawyer-ish approach rather than an engineer-ish approach.
What's your relationship with SawStop, if any, Ted?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You have a point. At the same time, you must have had the experience of ordering something and finding out after it hasn't shown up for a month or two that it is "on backorder," or there is a "shipment coming in soon," etc. If it is true that they have delivered a thousand saws already, I think that the "pre-order" is a reflection of honesty by the company, or a failure to update the web site.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup. A backorder is fine, if there's an expected delivery date attached to it.

I don't know of any more than the first batch of 49 demo units going out. Maybe someone does.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The blade lost a couple of teeth when removed from the brake cartridge. Other than that it didn't look too bad. We're not taking any chances, you never know what sort of metal fatigue or stress the sawstop has caused. Any manufacturers warranty would undoubtedly be voided by such misuse.
If a good dado set got whacked I may be tempted to use it again, but the $35 amana AGE's we're using (a great cheap blade BTW) are almost disposable the way our students treat them.
Our saws ARE NOT "demo" machines. I believe ours were in the 60's shipped out of production, not pre-production. That was at the end of December.
I'm sure that sawstop currently has a much smaller margin than delta/jet/grizzly. We got a better saw than a PM66, with sawstop from a very small production run for only $400 more than a 66. sawstop IS NOT making as much $ as jet/pm is on that 66. Sawstop needs to establish a market and surely considered the price points of the competition in doing so.
>>I'd say the SawStop makes a very modest improvement over existing >>safety technology, i.e. the blade guard.
That would maybe be true if 100% of tablesaws in use still had the bladeguards on them and they were used. We all know that a significant percentage of bladeguard are NEVER used and more are infrquently used.
Sawstop is a exponential improvement over a bladeguard in the garage rafters, the storage room, or the trash.
Dave Hinz wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So, it's wrecked.

Right.

How many have they shipped? And why are they so closed-mouthed about production volumes?

Except that I can have a bladeguard today if I choose to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I know that you have plonked me but geeeeez. It is not unrsual to have teeth replaced on a blade. Regardles I would much rather have a wrecked blade than a wrecked body part.

Sarcastic SOB. You truely are clueless.

It is simply none of your business.

But probably will not because you choose not to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 02 Feb 2005 22:44:29 GMT, "Leon"

It may not be our business, but it is hard to commit that much money to a brand new company without having some information and/or evidence that it is likely to be around for more than a year or so. While decent sales volume doesn't guarantee long-term viability, it helps.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ever start a new business? Sure, we'll buy from you when youhave a track record, but not just yet. Good thing someone took a chance and bought that first Studebaker or no telling how they would have wound up.
My first computer was a Texas Instruments TI-4A. Bought that because I knew they would be around to support it down the road.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Same with Oldsmobile. There are those that do, those that watch, and those the throw stones.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

Just a comment on Studebaker, but that "first Studebaker" was a farm wagon hand-made by the brothers Studebaker in their smithy and sold in 1856.
--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Befiore retiring from the automotive industry I was the GM of an AC/Delco/3M wholesale distributorship. The company was quite successful, the father and son owners retired as millionares, and we NEVER divulged our sales volume to any one with out a need to know interest. Why invite competition to see what a great business we had? SawSop survived 2 or 3 years with no sales. I suspect that with revenue coming in that the chances of survival are more likely. I suspect that SawStop began delivering units because there were many more people willing to give the product a chance than not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 03 Feb 2005 04:09:14 GMT, "Leon"

You were a reseller. Why the heck would anyone care how many parts you pushed through ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Umm. To make money and retire a millionaire and or retire at 40 like me. We certainly did not want any one cutting into our business. We had a very unique nitch in the market as we competed with our supplier and sold parts cheaper than our supplier, General Motors, selling to the GM dealers. Yes, we bought parts from GM and sold to GM dealers for less than what GM dealers would pay directly from GM. It was really stupidly simple and the business lasted for 25 years before the competition caught on. Most AC Delco wholesalers sold to the lower priced auto parts stores, jobbers, and small shops. Now that SawStop has committed to building the saw vs. licensing the product to other manufacturers they will want as little competition as possible and the best way to keep that from happening is to not let the secret of sales volume get out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 03 Feb 2005 04:09:14 GMT, "Leon"

That model fits a large number of the dot coms that are no longer with us.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.