SawStop is here!

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On Sat, 27 Apr 2013 03:30:18 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

You have to heat it gently. If you just stick it in the microwave on high, it will ruin the taste.
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What's with a microwave? Meat cooks terribly in a microwave, no matter what level you put it at. At best, I use a microwave to thaw a few foods, heat some veggies, or maybe cook a frozen microwave dinner if I'm in a rush.
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On Sun, 28 Apr 2013 11:48:23 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

You don't cook it, just reheat it. Done properly, it does not affect the taste. Done improperly, it ruins it. I reheat my lunch (consisting of leftovers) most every day with no problems.
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I guess it's just me then. Reheated meat of any type, however it's reheated just tastes Blah! It's just too bland compared to the taste of when it's oven cooked the first time.
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On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 01:06:07 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Could depend on how you like your meat cooked. The rarer you like your meat the less you loose flavor on the reheat. If you like it fairly well cooked on the first go around then I can see your point. You need some juice to reheat.
Mike M
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On Mon, 29 Apr 2013 07:23:22 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

I'll give you the not as good, but it can still be good.
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It really has to do with how you reheat and the meat what kind you are reheating.. The key for us is to reheat in the juices that cooked out during the cooking. For example we smoke a pretty good brisket. We cook it in an aluminum pan which captures all the liquids. After an hour of smoking we cover the pan with aluminum foil and finish cooking. After cooking we let the meat rest so that it will soak up some of those juices.
We keep the whole thing and can eat on that for several days, we typically oak 10~15 lbs.
When reheating we use the, now solid, juices to keep the meat moist when reheating.
The key is to reheat with the same juices that gave all the flavor and taste when first cooked.
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On Friday, April 26, 2013 1:00:38 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

just want part of it. Many foods come already frozen, such as pizza for example. Cut and cook just half of it for a meal.
You don't use a bandsaw to cut frozen pizza. You use your broad ax.

Consider dividing and packaging the selected portions before freezing it. Much easier and more convenient, than wrestling with a frozen quarter/half beef, hog or whatever. Don't forget to mark the individual packages, to identify what's within.
Sonny
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Everybody offering solutions is missing the point. If you've got a freezer in your refrigerator, then occasionally, there's going to be some food that it would be nice to cut from.
I'm not going to cut up a prime rib roast into steaks before I freeze it because I might want a roast easily available for a family dinner. I don't plan too many meals a week or more in advance, so how am to know if something should be cut up before it's frozen or not? And no, my freezer isn't big enough to keep very many different cuts of frozen meat on hand.
The question bordered on the hypothetical anyway, so I guess it's moot at this point. Very few people are going to run meat, frozen or not through their bandsaw.
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On 4/26/2013 8:25 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

You might be missing the obvious, do you want to contaminate your BS for the occasional situation that you might want to cut off a smaller portion of meat?? I would never consider doing this with anything other than a dedicated BS that is going to be cleaned and sanitized on a scheduled basis. You are going to end up with thousands of small chunks of animal product spread through your band saw and at the least I would think the draw of insects and the eventual smell of rot would detour you from considering this any further.
Push come to shove, take that frozen chunk of what ever you have and ask your butcher or local meat market to cut it up for you.
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All you youngster, city slickers talking 'bout sawing meat. With a with a BIG ASS BANDSAW! Back in the day, when we had to cut meat, we used a meat saw. It looked like a giant hacksaw. It had a meat (bone) blade on it. You operated in with your arm and hand. Ya know, MANUAL LABOR! And it did cut frozen meat. It would be a bit of a workout, but it got the job done.
This is a picture of a modern 25" manual meat saw. They come in different sizes.
<http://www.meatprocessingproducts.com/lem638.html
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On Fri, 26 Apr 2013 12:11:28 -0400, "Lee Michaels"

Thanks for that. I might order one.
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On 4/25/2013 3:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

no, and I don't know. I am sure any blade would do.
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On 4/25/2013 3:35 PM, Leon wrote:

and a cartridge for each, right?
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On 4/25/2013 2:24 PM, Sonny wrote:

LOL that was left over from the desk and airplane projects. The wall above that is totally filled with lumber. ;~)
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What did the shipping guys say about the excited home owner snapping pictures of them?
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On 4/25/2013 4:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

They were the manager and asst manager, we have know each other since the store opened. Not a problem.
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Congrats but there is some down side to your purchase. 1.Some assembly required. 2.Now you have to go back to work
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On 4/25/2013 4:29 PM, ChairMan wrote:

The out feed roller extension was a task although all went smoothly. It's the hoping you are drilling into cabinet in the right spot 6 times that kinda gets to you. I have installed the same set up before on a Jet cabinet saw some 13 years ago so I knew what to be where and aligned with what. It was actually easier this time.
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You remember how to do this from 13 years ago??
Obviously a youngster.
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