SawStop is here!

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The latest.
Bringing'r in http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8681424448/in/photostream
Unpacking http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8681425134/in/photostream/
Unwrapped http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8680316593/in/photostream/
For you patent buffs http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8680316593/in/photostream/
Setting in the hydraulic mobile base http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8680316593/in/photostream/
The other stuff http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8680318619/in/photostream/
A lot of cast iron inside there http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8680319295/in/photostream/
The gears, notice the curved surface of the tilt rack to fit with the worm gear http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8681429216/in/photostream/
Inside the left side of the saw door opening, lots more iron. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8680320825/in/photostream/
A reference for just how big those gears are. The worm gear is approximately 1-1/2" in diameter. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8680321455/in/photostream/
I got the industrial model and it weighs in at about 685 lbs with the 52 inch fence. Add 25lbs or so for the mobile base.
The mobile base is sweeeeeet. 3 pumps on the right front pedal and the saw is lifted up and all weight is transferred to the 4 corner wheels. tap the "lower" lever and the saw floats to rest on the floor releasing all weight from the wheels. This saw being about 200lbs heavier than my old Jet cabinet saw is much easier to move than the Jet 3 wheel mobile base and I thought that base was great. The new saw will almost roll out of the garage on its own when lifted up on the wheels.
At the risk of sounding like a broken record, Wow this thing is really well built with great attention to details. No sharp edges found yet.
Ill keep you posted as the saw and out feed comes together.
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There's nothing like welcoming a new baby into the house. Congratulations!
Larry
On Thursday, April 25, 2013 12:01:50 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

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On 4/25/2013 1:16 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

No kidding, Thank you
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On Thursday, April 25, 2013 12:01:50 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Pppffftt! You wasted your money. You ain't got enough lumber, back there, to do any decent sawing with.
*With the previous delays/miscues, incurred, did it come with a blade? :)
It all looks pretty darn sharp. Congrats, big time.
Sonny
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On 4/25/2013 3:24 PM, Sonny wrote:

Those saws are for hot dogs, aren't they?
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On 4/25/2013 2:27 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Yeah! I gotta stock up on weeners.
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Speaking of various types of butchery, have you ever cut (or been tempted) to cut frozen meat of some type on your Laguna bandsaw? Is there such a thing as a butchers blade for a home bandsaw?
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On Thursday, April 25, 2013 1:58:33 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Considering the lasting damage caused by my Jet 18" BS when I had a momentary laps and reached into a standard 3/4" blade, I don't think you need anything special to cut meat and bone efficiently.
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On Thu, 25 Apr 2013 14:21:47 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

I have read about special blades for meat cutting. However, I don't know what kind of difference one would make compared to a woodworking blade.
I was also wondering if it was inadvisable to chance blood and gore (initally frozen" spread around the insides of a woodworking bandsaw?
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On 04/25/2013 02:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

yes, a real mess - DAMHIKT
--
"Socialism is a philosophy of failure,the creed of ignorance, and the
gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 4/25/2013 5:21 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

laps and reached into a standard 3/4" blade, I don't think you need anything special to cut meat and bone efficiently.

Oh damnnnnnn.
--
Jeff

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On Thursday, April 25, 2013 3:58:33 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

tempted) to cut frozen meat of some type on your Laguna bandsaw?
Leon would no doubt wait for his meat to thaw, and cut it normally. To war rant butchering with one's woodworking tool, one would need to be butcherin g volumes, not something just for dinner.

My brother had a grocery store with a fairly large butcher service. That b andsaw casing/framework was made of aluminum, daily washed/cleaned with a d isinfectant or clorox, etc. I don't know what the other working parts were made of, something more substantial than aluminum, no doubt.
I never looked closely at the blade, but once asked the butcher about it. It was specific for bone cutting, more so than for cutting the meat, itself . I would assume the blade was specific only for the meat specific saw.
Additionally: Bone is a calcium crystaline form, the same as coral (i.e., coral reef). A s a matter of fact, some bone implants are made from coral. Soft tissue an d newly forming bone tissue grows around, grows into and attaches to coral the same way as it does around existing bone, in the repairing body. A pie ce of implanted coral does not grow. The body lays down new bone/new calci um around it, as it lays down new bone/new calcium around a fractured bone.
I don't recall which ones, but some specific lumbers (from specific areas?) have crystaline forms that collect in the wood, as it grows. Seems I read , milling and/or sawing these lumbers, with wood cutting tools, requires mo re frequent sharpening of blades, compared to normal lumber.
I think it's yucca trees/plants, or some specie of the aloes, that produce crystaline forms in them, as they grow. Native folk, of those areas, use t he stalks for stropping their tools. It's reasonable to think cutting bone with a wood cutting blade would dull the blade faster than normal.
Sonny
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"Sonny" wrote in message wrote:

I recall a discussion I had with a professional butcher about 30 years ago while he was cutting up a deer for me. Regarding saws in butchering, they are intended for cutting bone only. I watched as he carefully cut the meat down to the bone with a knife and then cut the bone only on the bandsaw. He had a less than flattering term for guys butchering deer for money who cut up the meat and bone with a bandsaw... After having a venison dinner at a friend's home one time, where the meat was clearly sawn with bits of bone "dust" through out, I understood his position on the matter. It was nasty...!
I butcher my deer own now and bone it as the meat is removed from the hanging carcass. This saves freezer space and there is no need for sawing anything. I do, however, chop the skeleton off at the end of the rib cage with a hatchet once the meat is removed... this so it fits in the trash can.
A SawStop, by design, would be useless for this application.
John
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On 4/25/2013 7:56 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

No kidding, I understand that SawStop is working on producing a band saw that will stop.
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wrote:

I can think of several situations where someone would have frozen food and just want part of it. Many foods come already frozen, such as pizza for example. Cut and cook just half of it for a meal. Or, perhaps buying an amount of meat when it was on sale and freezing it. Then cutting off a steak sized slice to thaw for consumption?
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snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote in

My solution is simply to cook the whole thing and then refrigerate the excess. There's always a need to eat tomorrow.
Seeing how dust gets all over the bandsaw, I'd be very reluctant to use it for any kind of food cutting. Food goes bad, spoils, then your shop stinks. (That won't stop me from making jokes about it... or suggesting we buy a drill press rather than a stand mixer. Actually that one might work ok.)
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 26 Apr 2013 07:34:34 GMT, Puckdropper

What???? You're kidding right? You like that kind of food? You've never frozen meat for future use? Never bought meat in any size bigger than a few pounds? And, meat that is cooked and then refrigerated doesn't come close to having the same taste as something just freshly cooked.
What kind of palate do you have?
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On Fri, 26 Apr 2013 07:42:43 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

You never eat leftovers? Perhaps you don't know how to treat them for a second meal. I take them for lunch all the time.
The past couple of weeks I've cooked on the weekend and froze a good portion for future use for easy quick meals. My wife is in the hospital and won't be cooking for a while when she gets home so I'm stocking up a little now.
Properly reheated, it is as good as the day it was cooked, exception being crispy chicken skin.
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Sure, but not as much as I used to. In this case, we're talking about meat and I rarely eat it. I've pretty much lost my taste for leftover meat. The only time I cook a roast beef is when I have friends over and they usually take what's left home with them for sandwiches during the week. I wouldn't eat it, so they might as well take it with them.

Maybe my reheating techniques need some improvement.
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------------------------------------------------------ That's why microwaves exist.
Lew
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