SawStop?

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GregP wrote:

I see that since you don't have a refutation for the argument you instead resort to a personal attack. Thank you for letting me know the depth of your commitment to reasoned discourse.
--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 07:48:15 -0500, "J. Clarke"

I don't see a reasoned discourse in your post, more of a Rushian-style diatribe. If there is some substance behind it, good, but it sounds very much like afternoon talk show noise.
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In wrote:

Okay then how's this for discourse... That's the reason why your not supposed to put children in a child seat facing the airbags, or not put them in the front seat at all...but you probably knew this already, right?
--
Ted Harris
http://www.tedharris.com
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I continue to be amazed by the apparent perception of so many people that "government is omniscient".
"Government" is a legal entity that knows nothing and does nothing except through the knowledge and actions of people. People who, in the vast majority, are faceless and anonymous to the general public. Elected officials are so grossly outnumbered by the appointed and/or otherwise employed functionaries that they, the elected, could almost be considered insignificant. No, I don't have numbers readily available, but I think you'd agree that the number of elected officials in this country divided by the total number of government employees is a very small fraction.
The point to this is, why should I automatically substitute the judgment of those faceless, anonymous people - a mix of good, bad, indifferent, competent and incompetent people - for my own judgment? I have not been certified as legally incompetent by a court of law. At least, not yet.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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wrote:

It's speculative, of course, since it didn't happen. But it's hardly revisionist history. The fact is that seat belts were becoming increasingly common, both as aftermarket items and as options on some cars. If you follow the trend it's easy to see that seatbelts were on the verge of being widely adopted.
Nor is it true that seat belts were generally regarded as wimpy. To my knowledge one of the first groups to adopt them were pilots. In fact I knew several who had installed aircraft harnesses in their cars.
The objections to seat belts were already being addressed by insurance companies and others concerned with traffic safety who were conducting public information campaigns.
As for disc brakes -- they were common on automobiles long before government regulation. They were more common in European vehicles, but they were spreading fairly quickly to US automobiles because they were seen as a 'sporty' prestige item.
--RC
Projects expand to fill the clamps available -- plus 20 percent
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Has anyone read how this technology works? In a nutshell, it detects the electrical signal of your finger using the blade as a conductor. I wonder if this means that HSS is in, and carbide is out since the adhesive and the carbide may insulate the signal. http://www.sawstop.com/howworks.htm
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Carbide is usually brazed to the sawblade. Last time I checked bronze conducted electricity. I believe tungsten carbide does as well. But it won't work for blades with big diamond teeth.
-j
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I'm not sure if tungsten carbide conducts electricity, but it really doesn't matter. The carbide tips on a saw aren't pure tungsten carbide - there is a metallic binder (nickel or cobalt, I recall) mixed with the carbide grains. So, it will conduct.
John Martin
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Brass and tungsten carbide conduct well, I think. Unless your TS blade has the teeth epoxied in or something?
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Todd the wood junkie wrote:

I thought he was using a carbide blade when he demostrated it. If it won't work with a carbide blade then it's worthless.
--
--John
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The real problems Saw Stop creates are the ones they didn't forsee.
First, OSHA will probably require that type of technology sooner or later.
Second, the blade makers will get on the band wagon if they see a new market created for them when the stop activates
Third, clumsy people like me will have to find whole new ways to get hurt in the shop.
Seriously, that is what will happen in a non-factory setting. CAre around the woodshop generally starts with the tablesaw, and with that removed from the danger list, tired, clumsy or careless woodworkers will need to develop yet another mindset. The last time there was such a shift was when round cutterheads supplanted square ones in jointers.
So I think in the years to come, there wil be a host of accidents using other tools in SawStop equipped shops.
Therefore, I resolve to never do anything that will constitute any kind of risk. That includes eating, breathing, drinking, walking in poluted air, lying in bed (see Cristopher Reeve), reading newspapers too liberal, too conservative, or anythign else.
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