SawStop

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Saw that article this month (Fine Woodworking) on SawStop. With thousands of amputations a year occuring with tablesaw accidents, any bets on how long it takes for this to be a standard feature? It seems to me that it will get hard for manufacturers to avoid it, if for no other reason than to head off lawsuits from people who claim that the manufactures had the option to manufacture a safer saw. And if it works and is reasonable priced, it is probably a good thing to have as standard equipment... like seatbelts, airbags, etc.
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I don't think it will. as pointed out several times, if it is less than 100% foolproof, the liabilities faced would increase manyfold. As an aside, most powertools are inherently dangerous due to their nature. It is really up to the operator to make things as safe as possible

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Besides, Saw Stop is not a brand new idea. It's been out long enough for manufacturers to have looked at it and decided if it was worth installing. So far, I haven't seen any saws with it.
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I got the FWW Tools & Shops issue today and the article on SawStop said that the saw blade is WELDED to the aluminum stop when it's engaged, meaning that you have to replace BOTH every time it happens. How'd ya like to replace a $100 Forrest WWII every week?

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Larry Jaques wrote:

Larry, do you stick your hand in a spinning saw blade on a weekly basis? ;-)
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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+ the cartridge, but a recent chisel accident to save $29.00 cost me $75.00 in emergency room fees.. :)
Alan
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Replacing a blade is cheaper than a trip to the ER for a hand injury
Larry Jaques wrote:

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wrote:

After the first couple of times, I think I'd decide to use a knife to slice the wieners for the beanie-weenies
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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If I were cutting off a finger every week, a $100 Forrest blade would be the least of my worries.
--
Hank Gillette

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Hey, no worries. After ten weeks you wouldn't need the sawstop or a new blade anymore. :)
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I appreciate the point, but I suspect that most people who have worked in a factory appreciate the value of required safety devices on the inherently dangerous devices. It is up to the operator to make them as safe as possible, I agree. It is the responsibility of the manufacturer to avoid manufacturing a device that is more dangerous than necessary. If SawStop works as well as the initial reports seem to say, costs an affordable amount, then the definition of "inherent dangerousness" changes. They are less inherantly dangerous if manufactured using safer and available technology.
ks wrote:

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tzipple wrote:

In the shop at Hamilton Standard there was a hydraulic press. It had been there for more than 50 years and there had never been an injury associated with it. Nonetheless, the safety engineers decided that it needed a guard. In the next year there were five injuries caused by the guard.
"Required safety devices" don't always add safety.

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--John
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tzipple wrote:

those "thousands" of amputees? I ain't buyin' it...
Philski
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philski wrote:

phil(ski)
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One of the very best climber cut his finger off on a table saw. They could have reattached, but then he couldn't have climbed for 6 months and he wasn't willing to do that; so he went without.
That is one.
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philski wrote:

This was discussed a while back. I found a source of information on this then--you can find that post at <http://groups.google.com/groups?q=saw+eye+group:rec.woodworking+author:J +author:Clarke&start&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&c2coff=1&safe=off&selm2fj7019lo%40news2.newsguy.com&rnum>
In short though, in 2002 there were approximately 3503 table-saw amputations, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission <http://www.cpsc.gov/library/neiss.html>. That site also explains themethodology--it's based on emergency-room reports though.

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--John
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philski responds:

Me either. I searched for facts and figures on this a couple, three months ago when Saw Stop came up for the 32nd or so time. Nothing definitive, lots of guesswork, so my guess of amputations in the low dozens is as good as any.
I first saw the demo video of the SS back in 2000, IIRC, at IWF in Atlanta. It was, and remains, impressive, but IMHO what would be more impressive is a total, simple, solution to kickback that is low in cost. Rough guess: there are 100 times as many injuries from kickback as there are from sticking a body part into the saw blade.
And I have to wonder, too, if figures exist do they count such "amputations" as one an uncle of mine got a decade or so ago. He ran his finger tip over the 1/8" or so of blade above the wood, and lost about 1/8" of the fingertip. Hurts. Bleeds a lot. Amputation or cut?
Charlie Self "If a politician found he had cannibals among his constituents, he would promise them missionaries for dinner." H. L. Mencken
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A fingertip probably qualifies. The dictionary defines it as "cut off part of body: to cut off a limb or other appendage of the body, especially in a surgical operation". I'd guess if it was something that doesn't grow back, then it qualifies as being amputated.
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Upscale responds:

You're probably right. But if his fingertips are like mine, he can spare 1/8" without hitting bone, or at least without hitting it hard. My concept, if not definition, of amputation has always involved bone.
Enough. This is making my fingernails itch.
Charlie Self "If a politician found he had cannibals among his constituents, he would promise them missionaries for dinner." H. L. Mencken
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According to the article in fine Woodworking, kickback as a source of injury seemed to be about twice as common as amputation.
By the way, the SawStop has a riving knife, a better kickback solution than usually found on US saws..
Charlie Self wrote:

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