sawing lumber on my bandsaw, right...

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I have cut some lumber out of black locust firewood. When just fine, cuts it like butter.
A friend had a black walnut tree taken down. I got the tree guy to leave me a 4' piece of the 4' diameter trunk. Well, actually he sold it to me, cut in half, for $30.
I split it up into manageable pieces and then tried cutting it. My band saw just won't do it. Even at a really slow feed rate it goes to a 30 degree drift (on the black locust it was dead straight) and then it just binds up. I am only trying to cut a 5" thick piece.
Obviously I am doing something really wrong, but what? Okay, it is not the right blade (1/2" 4tpi) but it worked fine on the black locust.
Any help would be appreciated, or it becomes expensive firewood.
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Toller wrote:

Hard to say, from here. Are you using a sled? What have you tried?
er
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The bottom and the side I have against the fence are pretty flat, so I didn't think I needed one; I have just been running it though the saw (well, trying to run it though the saw) against the fence. It worked for the black locust. I can make a sled up easily enough and see if it helps.
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Toller wrote:

That isn't the blade the saw came with, is it? You might also consider one with lower tpi for resawing big boards like that.
Everyone raves about the woodslicer blades, and I'm happy with the suffolk blades I have.
Or wax the wood and send it to me. :)
er
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Is this the same saw you bragged that had no problem right from the factory? Take it back and get a Jet.
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wrote in message

certainly not blaming it on the saw. But thanks for your moronic advice.
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I read you post. Moronic is a poor choice of words. Sarcastic is more fitting. How about annoyingly sarcastic?
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wrote:

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Any possibility that you forgot to tension the blade properly?
H
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It's the blade guides - I used to have the exact same problems until I switched to roller guides and a 3/4" blade on my resaw and now have no problems at all with any wood, thickness or feed rate.
Woody
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Anonymous wrote:

With a 1/2" blade it has to be jumping out of the guides to get a 30 degree drift, it's true.
Toller, your guides... they're snug up against the blade?
er
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Not real tight, I am a little scared of too much metal-metal contact. I have a set of cool block that I haven't installed. Would they be okay for this? I intended to use them with a thinner blade. Or should I just set the steel blocks tigher?

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Toller wrote:

I have roller bearings on mine, and set them so there is very little sideways play for the blade. A little more for the rear bearings (a bill folded twice.)
Cool blocks will also work, but you shouldn't require them for a 1/2" blade. You can bury the blade in the cool blocks I think (don't have them myself) and let the blade make its own clearance.
er
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yep.. I've been running the same set of cool blocks for a year or so, and rotate them during blade changes... (translation: when the old blade doesn't cut anymore)
I set them flush with the blade sides, loose enough to turn the upper wheel by hand... they work really well for me... Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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14" saw, but that doesn't make it necessarily true.
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inner door panel, but I think they suck.. I do much better with a 3/8" 3 tpi blade..
I've found that the things that give me the most trouble on the band saw are things that can rock.. even a little bit... they constantly change the blades attack angle or whatever and make it bind..
I use a method now that I think I remember getting from Charlie B's site? which is simply setting the wood on a flat piece of scrap and running a few screws into it (away from where you're gonna cut) and running it through the saw "flat stock side down".. Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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It's a Delta's 18" bandsaw, 2 hp..... I think it's model 28-682.
Toller wrote:

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Toller wrote:

Hmm. I have one, and I've used it, and it works. But I have the riser block, as well.
er
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Before I got my Rikon I was using a 14" saw which I still have. I was told if you got a good bi-metal blade you could go to 3/4". I bought a lenox saw blade I think its 2 or 3 TPI. I was able to use my fastrac fense with no adjustment for drift. The biggest problem was just only having 3/4 HP for power. I still keep the saw but just run smaller blades on it and that lets me leave a fat blade on the Rikon. Mine is rated for a 5/8 blade which I have but never took out of the box. Oh well never hurts to have extra blades.
Miked M

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I'm thinking the walnut is still very green - the 4t/inch is filling with sawdust, friction is heating up things inside the cut and swelling the moisture-laden wood so that the blade just gets to a point where it can't move. When the teeth fill and we push harder and the wood starts to bind the blade, it'll wander toward the neighbor's place.
Try a 3/8" 3 tooth blade - preferably with a generous set to the teeth so that it cuts a wide kerf to help keep things open. Timberwolf sells such a blade just for cutting wet woods - I think Highland Hardware has one as well, but I'm not familiar with any wide set to the teeth on that one.
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