sawing longer length without a table saw?

Is it possible? Because I absolutely cannot use a table saw in my apartment or on the patio, too many other apartments and the noise of ripping would be far too much. So I need something like a guide system that will take a large back saw, any such thing exist from any company or jig maker? I only need 16" length at the most for boards for small boxes, maybe there is a design somewhere on the 'net?
Thanks much all,
Alex
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Time to practice with a handsaw along a line? (I'm not being sarcastic, BTW)
Maybe a Japanese style Ryoba (pull) saw...
<http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page2941&category=1,42884,4289 6> or <http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page2940&category=1,42884,4289 6>
Cut slightly proud of the line, then clean up with a plane?
djb
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Doesn't a 'back saw' indicate a strenghtening ridge , or 'back' on the top of the saw blade? The back saws I have still cut on the push stroke, and are set for cross cutting.
Dave's suggestion of a Japanese style saw would seem to be the easiest, and most available new, although the venerable Disston rip saw my father gave me works quietly and well, when I need to work quietly and electricity free. Or when I just need some Galloot therapy. ;-)
Patriarch, whose Grandpa never had a Unisaw...
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AArDvarK wrote:

There are several possibilities. If you don't need a lot of cut depth a Bosch saber saw either with a fence or mounted upside down in a table is one possibility--with the right blade it makes a remarkably smooth cut, and little noise--other brands may work well now--it's been a couple of decades now since I used a saber saw that wasn't Bosch and at that time there were two kinds of saber saw, Bosch and crap--but the Bosch is a sure thing. If you need more depth but not a lot of width a band saw is also relatively quiet but a good one is a good deal more expensive. You could use just a plain old ordinary rip saw (learn to sharpen it) or make up a frame saw <http://www.hyperkitten.com/woodworking/frame_saw.php3 (make it a gooddeal longer than that one for what you seem to want to do) and add a fence--in either case learn how to sharpen the blade--the functioning of handsaws is strongly dependent on the set and sharpness and what comes from the factory usually isn't very good.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Your best bet for ripping is a good hand saw. As far as I know there is no jig or fixture for this kind of work that does any better than speed square. I find myself doing this more and more rather than dealing with the hassle of turning on my table saw. You can clean up the edge with a plane and it will look as good as anything you will ever see. Cross cutting can be done every bit as well with a manual miter box saw. If you use the right saw for the job, you will be amazed at how simple it all becomes.
Jim

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My 18v circular saw is pretty quiet; quieter than my jigsaw. I have a large aluminum guide/clamp I use for crosscutting large panels. It would work just as well for ripping.
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Same with my 14.4 volt. Remarkably good cuts from a small blade. A guide and patience and you can get a good job to be cleaned up with a plane. I use the 14.4 only for some occasional use, but in your situation, the 18V or larger would be a good plan. Ed
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Believe it or not, my brother lives in a small condo near Carlsbad CA. and has a complete miniature workshop in one of the small bedrooms. He has a 6" tablesaw, 10" bandsaw, scrollsaw, routertable, jet mini lathe and assorted other tools. He has a dust collection system and a small air compressor. He has never had a noise complaint. He makes small boxes and intricate inlays and shadow boxes.
Dave

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Well everyone I think I get the point of what I presented as somewhat hard to visualize. I need to replace a tablesaw for exactly what it does, outside of miter cutting and guide, just to be able to cut perfectly straight and accurately. I thank you all for trying to help, and taking the time to type in response to someone none of you know, kind souls every- where. Mr. Clarke, that saw and your hand work is very nice! I also love aquaria but currently have nothing set up. I used to have a 29 gallon African Cichlid tank.
What I did finally think-up is something like a wooden miter box, but without any miter angle slots as saw guides, just straight ones about every inch, only on the two long side ends of a rectangular box. The box is only about 2" cutting depth with four walls, and clamping screws with ferruled handles going into the sides, made from Jorgensen screw- spindles ordered as spare parts, with the barrel nuts in the walls. I'll have to order the largest spindles because they have opposing threads on either sides of the center, then get them cut in half. These will hold wood in place with wood shims. Inside dimensions should be 16" or 20" length x 12" or 16" wide, and 2" deep, all as internal dimensions. I will probably need to compensate for the width size for kerf widths, though I don't know if I need to. I have a backsaw coming from an ebay purchase which has a cutting length of 21", should do nicely in a 16" long box idea.
Any critiques or advise on this idea?
Thanks again all,
Alex
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