Saw blades with V shaped cutters


Anyone aware of a source of saw blades that leave a "V" shaped cut?
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snipped-for-privacy@fablab.net wrote:

How deep? In what material? For what kind of saw? Does the whole cut need to be a "v", or just the ends of the teeth? My first thoughts would be to make 2 passes on the TS with the blade at an angle, to use a v-groove router bit, or to use a beading tool, depending on the answers to some of your questions above. Andy
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The depth is .06" in .125" material. The whole cut in the material is shaped like a 90 degree "V". The material is Sintra,(expanded polyurethane)--a soft plastic. I want to stack two blades on an arbor .75" apart--somewhat like one would do with a dado set up. Then I could cut cut two V shaped grooves at once.
The resulting V shapes helps the plastic heat bend in the right places, and the 90 degree kerf closes the plastic up after the bend.
A multistep procedure is not practical here. We run thousands of these parts per year in my plastic fabrication shop and I'm trying to replace my current set up which is two routers staggered apart on a shop built router table with a fence. I've tried every possible router bit geometry available and get results that are acceptable but not ideal. I'd like to get cleaner grooves and avoid running two screaming routers for days at a time.
I could use shaper cutters which are available off the shelf and build myself a machine, but I thought if I could find a table top table saw with enough room on the arbor for blades .75" apart and the right blades, I could save some time, effort and $$$.
I asked the question in this group because I can't find my desired blade on the internet and figure you guys may have the answer.
Thanks for your help.
A> How deep? In what material? For what kind of saw? Does the whole cut

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snipped-for-privacy@fablab.net writes:

Have you tried asking a blade manufacturer, like Forrest? If you do this a lot, it might be worth paying for a custom-ground blade.
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Sounds to me like you are thinking of the WRONG TOOLING . . .
How about a 'Trim router' with a 'veining' bit. Can't believe one isn't available in Carbide?? In fact, there are some companies who will CUSTOM MAKE a bit. {In a high production shop this cost should be amortized quickly} Easy enough to handle, and the 'set-up' jig equally so. {One router . . . re-positioned for each cut, or two routers - 'off-set' } 'Muffling' should be easy . . . small enough to put a 'blister' around the jig, with 'air in' and 'air out' flexible 'piping' for cooling. Not much strain on the equipment . . . you'll be barely touching the material as you are cutting.
Obviously, you could use a heavier, full sized router . . . especially if the weight was to your advantage.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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How big is the stock you want to run through this device?
If it is not too big, and you need to do some volume, I would look into a molder. Get a custom molder knives made and just run the material through the molder. If you haven't seen a molder, they kind of look like a planer. With various shaped knives to cut a profile into the wood.
You might even be able to get a custom molder blades made for a table saw.
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cbenson wrote...

I would think Mike Santarone @ National Carbide Saw & Tool could make something like that up. He's made custom blades for my shop; top-notch quality, tight tolerances, and very resonable pricing. His understanding of saw-blade geometry is impressive, so he'll understand how to get the cut you want in the material you're using. Worth giving Mike a call at 215-333-0441.
We used to do v-grooving in plexi for heat bending using a triple chip at a 45. Your idea to have a blade ground just for v-grooving sounds like a much better idea.
-- Timothy Juvenal www.tjwoodworking.com
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Wow, I'm impressed with the prompt and thoughtful replies generated in this group.
Ron, I think I've tried every off the shelf "V" producing router bit available. The one we've settled on is a Bosch V-grooving and scoring bit #85284 (solid carbide). We use the Porter Cable 3+ horse routers because we've got a bunch of them and they last forever. I'm skeptical about the laminate trim sized routers standing up to continuous use.
I think the real problem is there isn't a good path to evacuate chips from a router cutter. The material has a low melting point and regrind and chips melting back onto the kerf are the main problem. A saw blade would carry the chips away from the kerf.
Lee, the parts are 14" wide. I'll check out molders before I take action.
Hambone and DJ, I think the custom blade idea is the most promising, especially since they'd fit on a table saw and save the expense of custom machine building. (of course I was hoping someone already made such a blade as a standard product.) I will call Mike Santarone.
Thank again.
Curt Benson fablab.net

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Seems to me regular kerf blades are more than 0.06", so you really just need the regrind, not custom teeth. Wilson

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Here is a couple to look at that are not monster industrial machines.
http://www.rbiwoodtools.com/woodplaner.html
http://www.woodmastertools.com/s/planers.cfm
I should point out that both of these machines can do gang ripping. You can install multiple saw blades to any width you want. The advantage of these machines is that the spacing of the rip blades can be changed at any time. Or just change the molder cutters.
The size of stock that can go through them or the size of saw blades are thing you will have to check out. I just knew about these and threw out the suggestions.
I know that custom guitar makers use a gang rip machine (usually made in shop) to cut the fret grooves on the neck of guitars. Maybe there is some info on these you could research that could help you.
Good luck coming up with a suitable solution for your problem.

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The problem with V groove router bits is that they don't cut at the center. The surface speed at the outside edge is quite fast enabling it to cut well. Surface speed diminishes toward the center of the bit becoming essentially zero in the middle The tip acts as a scriber, plowing a groove rather than cutting. A saw blade would be much better for your application.

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Sounds like a custom grind would be the answer. Added benefit to that is that the grinder could insure that both blades are the same diameter. Not surprised that the routers didn't work well.

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On 31 Jul 2006 08:47:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@fablab.net wrote:

I know "production" and "hand plane" are not generally found together these days, but what about a simple wooden plane with 2 v cutters in it? I would think that you could do it in one pass and just have one long curl come off. It'd sure be quieter than any number of routers or table saws.
-Leuf
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You know Leuf, you may be on to something there.
Figure out some kind of fence system. Lay it on the plastic stock, then just push a sweet, pretty Steve Knight Plane over the stock. Maybe something in cocobolo.
It would require some kind of specialized plane blades. But oldtimers had thousands of profiles. I am sure something could be figured out pretty easily. An added bonus would be that the stock is soft. This would greatly reduce the sharpening involved.
Steve Knight, are you listening?
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Did you look at the LRH molding head for tablesaws?
I think they might have a v-groove cutter head for your work.
Here's a link:
http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com/reviews/magicmolder.htm
MJ Wallace
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I don't know about LRH, but Corob definitely make a molding head and 90 degree V cutters:
http://corobcutters.com/shapeknives.php
Nice folks to deal with, too.
John Martin
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