Saving Partial Cans of Paint

This's been covered before. And people go on about using propane, and what all. But I never saw this one before.
Not original with me, I just ran across it a day or so ago, but seems excellent.
Take waxed paper, set the paint can on it, and cut out a circle just the size of the can. Then set the circle in the can, right on top of the paint. Put the top back on the can. Next time you want to use the paint just peel the waxed paper circle off and toss it. I haven't tried it yet, but would seem to be as effective as the fancy (read expensive) gases and loads less expensive.
JOAT Bugrit. Millennium hand AND shrimp.
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Sounds reasonable. I'm wondering if tin foil might accomplish the same thing?
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Tue, Jan 23, 2007, 2:14am snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com (Upscale) doth wondereth: Sounds reasonable. I'm wondering if tin foil might accomplish the same thing?
I'm thinking tin foil wouldn't be near as easy to get flat.
JOAT Bugrit. Millennium hand AND shrimp.
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J T wrote:

I use plastic wrap. You can get is right down on top of the paint, and you can leave enough plastic wrap going up the edges to make it easy to remove without getting paint all over your hands. Works like a charm.
Kerry
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On 23 Jan 2007 07:14:36 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That's what I do - when I remember. -- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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RE: Subject
Propane.
Simple.
No mess.
Have used it for years.
Lew
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On Tue, 23 Jan 2007 18:52:00 GMT, Lew Hodgett

Sorry Lew, I'm missing something here. Do you heat the paint? ???
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Tim Douglass wrote:
> Sorry Lew, I'm missing something here. Do you heat the paint? ???
Naw.
The reason paint cans skin over is the oxygen in the air that gets trapped when you seal the can.
Remove the oxygen, no skinning.
Propane is heavier than air.
Simply point an unlit propane torch down into the can for a few seconds, allowing propane to fill the space above the paint, then seal.
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message

I've got a mental picture of Bogart doing that, with a lit cigarette in his mouth, while Bacall looks on ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/06/07
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On Wed, 24 Jan 2007 17:28:29 GMT, Lew Hodgett

OK, that makes sense. Obviously no smoking while doing this...
Now that you mention it, I seem to recall seeing a commercial product that had an inert heavier than air gas in it for that purpose. I'm always a bit leery about flammable gasses floating around the shop. Of course the plastic wrap blocks the air from the paint too.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Then go pick up one of the kits that they use when resealing open bottles of wine. It's a common practise. No flammable material and it's designed for replacing air with a heavier than oxygen gas.
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Upscale wrote:

The products are known as "Bloxygen" (woodworking stores) and "Winesaver" (wine shops).
Bloxygen a.) works great, b.) is non-flammable, c.) may not be much more expensive per shot compared to propane purchased in small quantities, d.) per the label, is not for latex or water-based products.
I'd guess the can actually contains argon.
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wrote:

Hmmm. Doesn't work for latex or water-based. That's interesting. Of course I don't ever recall really having much trouble with latex skinning over, it seems that the pigments settle out and you get a layer of water on the top that pretty much keeps things liquid.
However, given my total CRS that keeps me from remembering to do even what I have been trying to do in the past I doubt I'll adopt any new approach. -- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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I use aluminum foil, works great. It is hard to use in small quart cans especially if they are more than half full.
(Upscale) doth

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Turn the can up side down.
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