Saving existing linoleum?

We're pulling out old cabinets in the kitchen and installing new one. Mostly they will have the same footprint, but there is one area where the subfloor will be exposed. There's another area where the existing linoleum will be covered up. I'm thinking about pulling up the linoleum in that area and piecing it over the exposed area. The pattern lends itself to this and should look fine.
Question is... the linoleum was put down about 10 years ago and I don't know if it will come up easily or not. If it does, no big deal. But if not, and it's glued down, can anyone suggest a way to try and peel it up?
Thanks.
Bob
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RE: Subject
You don't even want to think about going there.
Leave the old floor as is, lay 1/4 ply over it, then lay a new floor.
If you have access to a seam roller, a seamless job is not that difficult.
Lew
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In 10 years, it has probably lost some resiliency and it not going to patch well. Considering the cost of cabinets and the other work you will be doing, consider a new floor to finish the job right.
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Sheet vinyl is often installed with a full glue coverage. Most floor adhesives respond to heat. If you don't have a heat gun, the wife might have a hair dryer - just don't let her see you using it. If it doesn't work, you are no farther behind.
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Much obliged, DanG. I do have a heat gun so, I'll give it try. Won't hurt anything unless I burn down the house and, heck, we need a new house anyways.

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If it's glued, and it probably is, you are in for a tough job. I agree with others that a new floor is the way to go. However, I have lived during tough times and know that it's not always possible to afford things like that. Anyhow, take it easy with the heat gun or you can char the surface. Some adhesives are water soluable too, and soaking with wet sponges will help. Another thing you could do is to make a border around the cabinets. Maybe a row of 12" tiles of a contrasting color around all the cabinets. You can carefully cut a 12" border into the lino, remove it, and install the tiles. If the tiles are thinner, glue down some felt paper with the flooring adhesive in layers till you get the desired thickness. I worked for a flooring company several years ago. There are all kinds of tricks if you know what to do. One other thing, an electric iron might help too. Try to find a spot where you dont need to save the lino and experiment with heat gun, iron, steam (from iron) and soaking. For soaking, water will only get under the edge, it wont penetrate the lino. By the way, what you have is vinyl. They have not made linoleum in many years, but we all still call it linoleum....
If you have a way to post a photo of the lino and the adhesive, I may be able to tell you a little more. The backing on the vinyl matters too. The white foam type tends to peel, whereas the gray asbestos backing is a little more forgiving. And by the way, lets not get into an asbestos panic discussion. It's suspended and is harmless unless you grind it or saw through it, and turn it into dust. The old burlap (actual linoleum) was actually the easiest to remove without damage, but you dont have that if its 10 years old.
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Thanks for the tips. The vinyl is Armstrong sheet. I'll try out a few things this week and take photo and post it to these two groups:
alt.binaries.crafts.pictures alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
Bob
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