Sandpaper for Sharpening

I'm planning on buying some sandpaper for sharpening planes and the like. Any cheap sources for a couple of sheets of the 1200-2000 grit stuff?
It's so much cheaper in 50 sheet packs....................
yitah
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoospam.com says...

part stores that carry auto paint.
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Sandpaper is not used for sharpening plane blades... you need to use an oil stone... available in good quality at any woodworkers type store.
Besides, I for one, have never heard of sandpaper in 1200 grit... the finest I've ever seen is 600.
wrote:

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On Thu, 25 Dec 2003 06:58:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@woodworker.com wrote:

Sure it is: <http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=Scary+Sharp&btnG=Google+Search
In fact it works extremely well.

Norton lists up to 3000 grit here: <http://www.nortonautomotive.com/catalog/displaytier.asp?tier_id 60010010020&display=all>
Barry
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With all due respect, the most you can say is that YOU prefer not to use sandpaper on plane irons. While I acknowledge that there are many means to the end of sharp irons, I, for one, prefer the Scary Sharp system, am more than satisfied with the results, and am not looking for another means of sharpening. If I come across a better way, I will consider changing, but until then . . .
As to the statement that you have never heard of sandpaper above 1200 grit, I suggest you go to any auto parts store and you will have no trouble finding 2000, and in many stores you will find even finer. I am not as anal as some, I finish my sharpening at 2000.
Glen
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I have oil stones, water stones, diamond stones, and sand paper. All get used for one thing or another.
For my buck, nothing flattens the back and creates the initial edge of a cutting tool better than sandpaper, lubed with kerosene or WD-40, on a jointer bed or strip of glass. I'll usually do the back and edge of a new tool with Scary Sharp, with quick maintenance touch-ups on the stones.
When I'm totally renewing an edge, out comes the 3M77, lube, and sandpaper again. <G>
What's nice about doing it on the jointer is that I can lay out grits from 80 to 2000, all in a line. When I'm done, I use the kerosene or WD-40 to wipe down the bed and remove the 3M77, followed by a quick coat of wax. A side benefit is a spotless jointer bed that's always waxed, slippery,, and clean.
Barry
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On Thu, 25 Dec 2003 06:58:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@woodworker.com wrote:

the ignorant do pontificate authoritatively, eh?

never sharpened anything with it either.
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    Greetings and Salutations.... On Thu, 25 Dec 2003 06:58:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@woodworker.com wrote:

Day.     It might be a good idea to go over to groups.google.com and do a search for "scary sharp".     The fact of the matter is that sandpaper IS used for sharpening blades of all sorts, and, works very well.     Oilstones are good, true enough, and, perhaps better in the long run. However, to get the blade "sharp enough" requires several grades, including some pretty expensive ones.

as fine or finer than 10,000. However, you will NOT find this stuff at the BORG. For the finer grits you will need to go to a good auto parts store, and poke around in the paint section. They, as a matter of course, have grits up to about 6000, and, can order grits that are much finer.
    For folks that are doing massive amounts of sharpening, it makes a lot of sense to invest in a good sharpening system. However, I suspect they would go with a Tormek or similar powered system. For those of us that DON'T have to sharpen the planes every couple of weeks we use them so much, a nice flat surface (Chunk of marble, glass, cast iron) and a pack of fine grit papers from the auto store can cheaply and quickly produce an edge that makes hand-working wood a pleasure.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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I sharpened my pocket knife on crocus cloth (what I had at work) and you could shave with it.
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Hanen't been around much? Go here: http://www.shavings.net/SCARY.HTM#original

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I remember seeing this years ago, back when I first started lurking around this ng. One trifle: Nitrogen fission is endothermic; in fact, fission of any element lighter than lead requires a net *input* of energy. Sorry if that spoils the joke. If you don't recognize the reference, you need to go back and read the whole webpage given in the above quote -- it's funny and educational, even if you have to overlook the part about nitrogen fission.
Got to thinking about this just today when my wife mentioned that one of the kids had a kitchen knife that was "scary sharp". Then I run across this thread in the wreck & go read about "scary sharp" again... Funny how you'll go months without hearing or reading something, then run into it twice the same day from unrelated sources...
All that aside, one of these days I'd like to put a real edge on some chisels, and maybe even do some Neander-planing. (After the tremendous success I had with Ray Audette's _NeanderThin_, & Loren Cordain's _The Paleo Diet_)
-- Howard Lee Harkness snipped-for-privacy@ev1.net / snipped-for-privacy@ev1.net Texas Licensed Independent Life, Health, Property & Casualty Insurance Agent Healthcare Savings: http://www.affhc.com Medicare supplement information: http://medigap.supremesite.net
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Howard wrote:

Or a corollary to that... You watch some random TV show once. Two years later, you happen to be in front of the tube, and the same random TV show is coming on. It will be the exact same episode more often than not.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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snipped-for-privacy@woodworker.com wrote:

Nonsense! I've never used anything else to sharpen my plane blades or chisels.

Nonsense again. Wal-Mart stocks paper up to 2,000 grit, in the automotive department.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Hi Folks, Yitah wrote:

I'll put in my two cents worth. For initial lapping of my plane blades and chisels, I have used microabrasive sheets, but I am currently trying using a diamond "stone" to get the initial tooling marks our of stubborn pieces before going to the microabrasive. Once you do the initial setup and honing, the rest should work well with the microabrasive. It's actually remarkably durable....I have honed many chisels and plane blades and rehoned them as well on the same set of microabrasive sheets. You can find both adhesive backed and non-adhesive backed microabrasive materials in a number of grits at:
http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/Merchant/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=toolshop&Category_Code=THS

Perhaps so. I think you might be thinking of wet or dry stuff, but the actual 3M Micro abrasive which has a mylar substrate, I think, is much more appropriate for the application. There is a very good explanation of the microabrasive at the same site linked above. The 3M Microabrasive is designed for cutting metal and does a really good job for me.....

Good luck
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I 1st grind my bevel on the belt sander with 100 grit. Then with a honing guide I use the belt sander laying horizontality (motor off) ,next on to a medium diamond stone, Then 1000 grit water stone, 6000 grit water stone, and then 3/0 emory polishing paper. The 3/0 leaves a mirror finish. Sometimes I then go to a leather strop.
Thanks, Tony D.

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