Sanding teak (interior use only)

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I have just completed a teak cover (top, bottom, and sides) for my crappy stone mantle on my fireplace. I want to sand the teak to remove some marks. I know teak is an oily wood. Does anyone have any advice for me? All I can find when I google is advice on boat decks and outdoor teak furniture where the teak has dried out in the sun. My mantle cover is 3/4" teak I purchased from a wood supplier in my area and it is still pretty oily.
Any advice would be much appreciated.
Dick Snyder
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On 1/28/2013 7:49 PM, Dick Snyder wrote:

Is there a question in there somewhere?
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Yes, the question is how do I sand it. I assume sand paper will just load up with oily wood. Should I use a coarse sand paper or maybe steel wool or .....?
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On 1/28/2013 8:01 PM, Dick Snyder wrote:

It will load but the type sand paper you use will make a big difference. An open coat sand paper will be less likely to load up. FWIW I have sanded a lot of oily woods, cocobolo and bocote to name a couple and they felt oily. I'd suggest sanding and see what happens. If you get a loading problem go to a hand plane or scraper.
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Teak has a high silica content. Plan to sharpen frequently.
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On Mon, 28 Jan 2013 20:49:15 -0500, "Dick Snyder"

Wet or oily?

Now's the time to buy a cabinet scraper and learn how to use it. They're really great. Find 'em locally or buy online. http://www.grizzly.com/products/6-pc-Scraper-Set/D3294
Alternatively, you can always wipe it down with acetone just prior to sanding. It's just wood. Don't forget to ventilate well. (I forgot to when doing a small amount of painting with Rustoleum a couple months ago and got a case of 45 minute flu from it. Thought I was gonna die for a while.)
-- Poverty is easy. It's Charity and Chastity that are hard. --anon
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wrote:

I will try both methods. I used acetone to get rid of the oil where I glued pieces together so I have some already. I have a cabinet scraper too and got a nice lesson on forming the burr at a woodworking show out here 3 weeks ago. I haven't had time to practice what I learned yet. I guess I will now.
Thanks for the tips.

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On Mon, 28 Jan 2013 21:41:25 -0500, "Dick Snyder"

Remember that for a less aggressive scraper, you don't have to turn a burr at all. Just file flat and smooth on a diamond plate. I prefer 'em this way.

You're welcome.
-- Poverty is easy. It's Charity and Chastity that are hard. --anon
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[..snip...]

What I have learned about forming the burr is to have a light touch, both when you burnish the flats on the scraper to roll out the steel, and when you actually roll the burr. You'd think a bigger hook would do a faster job but, not really.
Also your burnisher needs to be hard and smooth. Harder than the scraper, and some scrapers today are made out of very hard metal, more so than in the past. I just tried using a solid carbide router bit as a burnisher, it worked better than my Hock burnisher on my harder steel scrapers.
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"Larry Jaques" wrote

45 minute flu, eh? I always ventilated well with that stuff. Had big fans going, etc. I did a project about 3 months ago that involved several cans of Rustoleum. I did them all outside. It dried a lot faster when exposed to direct sunlight. Which only works when there is sun.
Take care of yourself Larry. What we used to get away with as youngsters just don't work any more. :(
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"Larry Jaques" wrote

------------------------------------------------------------------ If you EVER use acetone, or similar hydrocarbon solvent indoors, make DAMN SURE ALL gas pilot lights are turned OFF.
Failure to do so will almost certainly insure you will have a bomb go off and a resulting fire.
Ask the flooring contractors or guys who reface cabinets with laminate.
Lew
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Isn't acetone a key ingredient in some nail polish removers? All the more reason to stay away from nail polish... *g*
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On Jan 29, 2:57am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Acetone is one of the least toxic solvents.
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On 1/29/2013 4:46 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

I agree, but remember that acetone is a very volatile material, so it is like gasoline, and can be dangerous.
Also while it is not very toxic, unrestrained use can cause damage to the body. The most obvious will be the defatting of your skin. If you use it, the fat loss must be replaced with a good hand cream. (No it will not work on love handles that meet in the middle of your stomach)
Like any solvent and many drugs; alcohol, acetone, Acetaminophen, etc can caused liver damage, so another reason to handle it with care.
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On 1/29/2013 5:17 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Perhaps more volatile than gasoline, it will evaporate before your eyes.
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How heavy are the fumes? What makes gasoline suicide to use indoors is its weight, which makes the fumes pool and concentrate in low areas.
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On 29 Jan 2013 07:57:15 GMT, Puckdropper

I'm not going to even ask. 8-)
Mike M
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On 1/29/2013 12:42 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I saw a guy who was putting laminate on his counter with contact cement. He forgot the pilot light. It blew him through the door out into the yard. No serious injuries though. It may have been the alcohol fumes from his breath that caused the explosion.
--
G.W.Ross

What am I doing out of bed!?!?
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2013 00:11:16 -0500, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

You're absolutely right. I had thought the project was small enough (and the shop lost enough air) that it wouldn't be a problem. (3' long 4" sat dish tube) Never again. That's some nasty shit, Maynard.
-- Poverty is easy. It's Charity and Chastity that are hard. --anon
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wrote:

Larry, the cabinet scraper worked great. I did not put a burr on it as you suggested. I finished up with a light touch of Abranet sanding mesh attached to my ROS with a shop vac so I did not get much loading up. Thanks again for the idea.
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