Sanding table

I made a sanding table years ago from peg board that I enlarged the hole in and supported the board using small dowels to keep the board level but not block air flow.
I would like to cover that with a glued on router/sanding pad. My biggest fear is that spray 77 which I thought of using would just collect dust, and also get past just the glue-able area to the top of the pad, rolling on a contact cement would lead to the same.
How should I attach the pad to avoid gumming up the works? Thanks
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On 10/6/10 11:41 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

Find a self adhesive pad. Spray just the pad and apply it while the glue is still wet.
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I make sails. Sails are held together with double sided tape then sewn through cloth, tape and all. Sometimes there is some stickiness at the seams that could easily pick up dirt and look bad. My solution is to dust the finished seams with talcum powder and then brush it off. The talc dust takes away the stickiness and is so thin it can't be seen. Go ahead and use the spray. The first time you use the sanding table, it will take care of itself.
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

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Thanks both of you. I will give that a try.
On 10/6/2010 12:41 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

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On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 12:41:02 -0400, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

I use a pad on mine, actually the stuff they sell to make shelves non-skid, cuz I'm cheap.. I find that the pad tends to cling to the pegboard by itself, so I just lay it on the surface and tack the corners down..
Just a note... the pad does decrease the air flow to the DC..
mac
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"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

Think about what the function of a router/sanding pad is.....Why would you want to glue down a pad that naturally does not want to move? So your answer might be because as it gets loaded with dust it becomes less effective in holding itself and or things that you put on it in place. So again I ask why would you want to glue down a router pad?
Seems the suction of the sanding table should keep the pad in place..
I used router/sanding pads for years to cushion my work from the hard work surface and they worked fine but now I prefer to use the Bench Cookies that Rockler sells.
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My reason is two fold.. laziness for one and the pad creeps around after a while. I wipe it with alcohol or water to clean on a cloth to clean it.
The sanding table is removeable, so instead of having to setup the top on the bench and then add the pad, I just figured being sheer lazy and wanting to do the work and not have to spread out the mat that I would just glue it on.
On 10/7/2010 6:00 PM, Leon wrote:

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"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

Whel ther is nothing wrong with being lazy. ;~) but if you glue it down to tyour peg board, using water to clean it will be a thing of the past. I find that tossing the pad in the washer cleanis it pretty good.

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