sanding epoxy...

I am planning on gluing up some picture frames with West epoxy with wood dust filler. How well does the squeeze out sand?
I would just test it, but mixing up a small batch is a bit of a chore; so I am hoping someone knows from experience. Thanks
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I've used West (and many others) for many years - not in woodworking, but in hobby rocketry. The main issue is letting the resin fully polymerize (harden). West shouldn't give you any problem, as it's a good resin (getting the ratios wrong can cause problems with many epoxies - but most will -- eventually -- polymerize - might just take months, tho). West's pumps pretty much remove that problem, however.
But, at that point, it'll sand quite nicely. I would suggest doing this outside with appropriate respitory (sp?) protection - as epoxies have a habit of 'sensitizing' one - to the point of not even being able to walk into a room where they are being used (as one friend became - but he worked regularly with it for years). Be cautious and smart - protect your health.
-- john.

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Toller wrote:
> I am planning on gluing up some picture frames with West epoxy with wood > dust filler. > How well does the squeeze out sand?
As long as you understand that using wood dust filler adds no strength to the epoxy, no problem.
Wear disposable gloves (Good time for a trip to Harbor Freight) when working with epoxy and make sure your mix ratios are correct.
Allow at least a week to cure, especially this time of year. Heat lamps will shorten the cure time.
Once cured, sanding is no big deal.
Have fun.
Lew
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All depends on the filler. I use microballoons if I want to sand it. I guess "wood dust" might make it sandable too, but this is obviously variable. Unfilled is harder to sand than you'd want, silica fillers make it effectively impossible.
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Toller wrote:

Once cured, it sands fine. That assumes you can get at it easily. If your frame pieces are convoluted, that could be a problem and I'd try to avoid squeeze out and if not possible remove it before it sets. Vinegar works.
Just an FYI... Cyanoacrylate works nicely for frames. It might be easier and is definitely less messy. Of course, it needs smooth, well mated surfaces and the way to achieve that is chalk...rub chalk over both mating surfaces so it fills pores and low areas, blow off excess, apply CA, hold or clamp pieces til set. If the frame is going to be finished "natural" keep chalk maybe 1/16" away from the joint edge that will be visible.
I've put together 100s of frames using the above - frames from 16X20 to 30x40 with 5" moldings - and none ever failed.
--

dadiOH
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Toller wrote:

It tends to clog sand paper rather fast. You'll use of lot of paper. There comes a point where the epoxy is no longer sticky but is still fairly soft. At this point it is easy enough to cut and peel using sharp tools.
ron
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