Sanding after chamfering?

A few years ago I eased the edges of an oak face frame (by hand), then sanded the flat surfaces and then colored the wood with some dye. It was pretty unobservant of me, but I hadn't noticed that the sanding had pretty much negated the eased edge. Having colored the wood (to match other furniture), I couldn't ease the edges again, so I left them "sharper" than I might have liked.
Fast forward to now, lesson (potentially) learned. I'm planning to put a small chamfer on the edges of my panel doors. I'm guessing I should do that after I complete the rest of the sanding. But will I then need to sand the chamfered edge also, or will the router leave it smooth enough? I assume some sanding will be called for, but starting at what grit?
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Routed chamfer always leaves chatter, sanding required to remove. And, as you suggest, you will spoil the arris. A knife cut edge can be left as cut. Routers? See http://patwarner.com / *******************************************

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Perhaps its better not to chamfer - you're likely to slightly dubb (round) the arrises and spoil the highlights reflected from them.
Jeff, who reckons you can often tell the quality of a workman by the quality of his arrises.
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
email : Username is amgron
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