Sander Question

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On Mon, 23 Oct 2006 07:48:26 -0500, "Charlie M. 1958"

I use both. I like the palm sander for tighter places (it's a smaller, lighter sander), plus it is less aggressive than a random-orbit. In a pinch I could use just one of these two, but it's nice to have them both.
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Charlie M. 1958 wrote:

Random Orbital is definitely the way to go. Dynabrade is the best on the market.
Jonathan www.sandingsupply.com Dynabrade 56815 - 5" Non Vacuum Dynorbital Supreme Random Orbital Sander $151.99 Dynabrade 59020 - 5" Non-Vacuum Dynorbital-Spirit Random Orbital Sander $138.69
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Random Orbital is definitely the way to go. Dynabrade is the best on the market.
Jonathan www.sandingsupply.com Dynabrade 56815 - 5" Non Vacuum Dynorbital Supreme Random Orbital Sander $151.99 Dynabrade 59020 - 5" Non-Vacuum Dynorbital-SpiritT Random Orbital Sander $138.69
Do you recommend a 120 or 200 gallon compressor to go with those sanders?
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Leon wrote:

You could easily run two sanders off of a 120 compressor.
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You could easily run two sanders off of a 120 compressor.
I wonder how many people in a recreationatial news group would have access to a 120 gallon compressor?
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Leon wrote:

A question was asked, I provided an answer.
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Yes, but I asked another question!
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Leon wrote:

The solid surface trade, in my area, has tried just about everything. Right up to 10 HP 3phase 200 gallon compressors, using Sioux, Dynabrade, all kinds of sanders. With and without extraction. Almost without exception, all that hardware is collecting dust and the reigning devices are almost always either electric Fein or Festool... or a mix thereof. ( In my case, a Festool sander and a Fein vacuum in the shop.) I have a Fein sander and a Festool vacuum, sitting on the truck. I also use a 6" Ridgid ROS for some jobs. The Fein sander is okay, but big...8" and close to 2 HP. Perfect for an on-site seam when using it 'flat'. It has become clear, that for maximum performance of any sanding system, the removal of the waste is the key to a proper job. That is, in solid surface. Myself, I see no reason why that wouldn't true when sanding anything else. Most of my work is flat, which changes the requirements of the user.
Small, contour stuff, I either do by hand, or this nifty little Bosch 1297DK 1/4 sheet with optional adaptor so my Fein sucker works with it. Great little sander with good dust control.
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As I suspected.

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My experience is that the ROS will do maybe 90% of the sanding I need in a fraction of the time it would take with a palm sander. The palm sander's only advantage is working closer to a corner.
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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Charlie M. 1958 wrote:

I have and use both. I also use an 8" softpad. Of the three, I like the ROS the least and use it mostly with coarse grits for initial, rough sanding.
If I had to have just one of the three I'd keep the 1/4 sheet but IMO, the very best sander for finishing is a 1/2 sheet sander such as Porter Cable's #505 with a thick felt pad. The area covered is generous and the pad applies greater pressure to high areas thus flattening them as well as sanding overall.
--

dadiOH
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On Mon, 23 Oct 2006 07:48:26 -0500, "Charlie M. 1958"

I use the ROS for initial sanding, then finish with a cabinet scraper or a sanding block. The ROS will remove material quickly, and sometimes that's handy- but for a number of reasons, I've always prefered hand-sanding to any power sander. It works well, is quiet, and isn't actually that much harder than using a sander if you start with the appropriate grit and work up. It's nice to have those quiet moments in the shop during sanding to really look over an almost finished piece, and feel the contours while smoothing it.
Now, if I'm just whacking something together, and just giving it a quick smoothing, the ROS is the way to go.
In any case, I've never had a good result from a quarter-sheet sander. Could be my technique or the products I've used, but they seem to be all noise and no abrasion.
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