Sander Question

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I've always done major rough sanding with the belt sander, and used my quarter-sheet palm sander with progressively finer grits for finish work. I don't own a random-orbit sander, but they seem pretty popular. My question for you folks who use a random-orbit: Do you use it in place of a quarter-sheet sander, or do you use both? If you use both, what is the determining factor in which one you use for a given task?
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I haven't touched my 1/4 sheet sander since getting a RO sander. I usually use the RO sander until I've got a nice, even surface sanded to a medium/fine grit, then switch to hand sanding for one or two fine grits.
Mike
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Mike wrote:

Same here, except I use the ROS _and_ hand sand with the grain on the final grit. The hand sanding pass goes extremely quickly.
I'm not sure I know where my 1/4 sheet sander is...
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LOL ! I don't know where mine is either !
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Same here.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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for that. I used it a year ago with a foam pad that lets it do concavities, but it was clumsy and I haven't done it again. Time for ebay?
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Charlie M. 1958 wrote:

You hit it with the "rough" description, for the belt sander. IMHO, sanding is an inherently rough process- abrading wood fibes. Though not too rough for some projects, where I use ROS for the majority and quarter-sheet in the corners.
For really smooth finishes, I've been converted by others here to using a cabinet scraper. Works great for trimming off (cleanly) any surface irregularities. Typically quicker than sanding. No dust.
Belt-sander available cheap. Now just used occasionally on metal.
HTH, J
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I used to use a belt sander and a finish sander up until about 1989. I then switched to the PC right angle ROS and the PC SpeedBloc finishing sander. For me the PC right angle ROS replaced the Belt sander but IMHO is way too aggressive for finish sanding. I use the SpeedBloc for the finish sanding. Not all POS sanders are the same. I have used some ROS sanders than cannot keep up with my SpeedBloc finish sander. Like any other tool there will be a wide variance of efficiencies between brands and models within brands.
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I'm with you, I bought a ROS after reading this group. The only advantage over my 1978--1982 speed block is dust collection. The nice part is the pressure sensitive paper is cheap and you just keep tearing of the paper in whatever grit you want and go
Mike M
On Mon, 23 Oct 2006 14:01:53 GMT, "Leon"

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"Charlie M. 1958" wrote in message

I purposely use both. A Bosch 6" ROS, and a couple of 1/4 sheets (PC and an OLD Craftsman).
I generally start with the ROS through 100, then switch to the 1/4 sheet for 120 to 150/180, depending upon the finish. This removes any swirl marks that the ROS leaves that you often can't see until you stain.
Surprising at how much material a 1/4 sheet sander with good sandpaper, even at the finer grits, can remove, and, at least IME, how much easier it _selectively_ removes pencil/chalk layout marks and burns when you get to those finer grits.
Control of the 1/4 sheet is a bit better for me when sanding edges without rounding over, and the action of the 1/4 sheet itself is less likely to aggravate my poor old abused carpal tunnel nerves ... a bigger consideration the older you get.
As usual, YMMV ...
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After surgery, I was never able to play any musical instrument. That damned circumcision really took a lot out of me.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Reminds me of the guy who said "Doc, will I be able to play the piano after the surgery?" The doctor said "Sure!" The guy said "That's fantastic! I've always wanted to play the piano!"
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Charlie M. 1958 wrote:

Unfortunately, I _did_ play the bass, for ~ 25 years. I really miss it.
Music is a many-level outlet for a human that is often hard for non-musicians to understand. It's frustrating to no longer play.
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B A R R Y wrote:

I AM a musician, and I understand exactly what you mean. I'd have a hell of a time adjusting if, for some reason, I couldn't play any more. That is another reason I am EXTREMELY careful with my power toys.
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B A R R Y wrote: [snipped for brevity]

Truer words were never spoken. I never played professionally, because I never thought I was good enough. Few tried to encourage me. I just never saw the need. I just noodle away and pick songs I like and find challenging. Sometimes it takes weeks to get a certain lick down to where I'm happy with it. When alone, I pick at my much abused J50, when the wife and kid are home, I use headphones on my Tele. Heroes include, but not limited to: Roy Buchanan, Leo Kottke that sort of rot. Now I'm working on the Beatles' Blackbird. (A very nice version by Sarah McLauchlan is currently in CD player... tricky lill' tune, that.) I do get help from a friend of mine who does play professionally (he agrees that I probably shouldn't..lol) I really increased my time playing when I quit smoking 5 years ago.... it really helped.
Happiness is a fresh set of strings.
r
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<snip>

I had a similar problem recently with a 1/3 sheet Craftsman sander that I had for over thirty years. Whenever I used it, my hands and elbows would go numb. So it got tossed.
It played havoc with my golf game. I never could play an electric bass. ;-)
Take good care of yourself. We need old players!
Patriarch
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On Mon, 23 Oct 2006 07:48:26 -0500, "Charlie M. 1958"

Still use the quarter sheet in corners. ROS with velcro base gets 90% of the workload.
Frank
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I use both. The ROS is a little more aggressive - actually quite aggressive with coarser paper*. After inital sanding with the ROS I turn to the pad sander and hand sanding for finish.
* I have found that my ROS, with coarser paper, is a good helper when I need to sculpt an bit and it can dig in if I am not careful.
RonB

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Charlie,
I'll add another to the 'list' . . .
For 'rough' flattening and making scarf's on 'stair-stepped' sheets of ply - my 'straight-line' belt sander is THE tool.
For 'hogging out' or 'semi-carving' a flat, overlapping, 'flap disk' on a right-angle grinder is amazing - you have GOT to use a delicate touch, it's THAT quick.
The ROS {a 'right angle', adjustable speed, 'soft-pad', hook-n-loop} I use for 'intermediate prep' work. That is to about 120 grit.
For finer grit {to maybe 220}or small pieces, small places, or into corners I use the 1/4 sheet.
Above 220 I typically hand sand using any number of 'holders & formers'.
Of course none of this is 'graved in Stone'. It is really the job-at-hand that decides the 'best tool' to use.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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"Ron Magen" wrote in message

IIRC, there was a guy in a recent issue of FWW that used one of these to shape his artistic, and highly curved, furniture.
Now that I can easily do compound angled joinery on the Multi-router, I been itching to try it.
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