Sand in glue

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An alternative method that I use when I've _no_ other choice is to partially drive two or three small brads an inch or so apart in the middle of the joint/work-piece, then using a pair of pliers snip 'em off as close to the surface as possible.
I've found it works well, but I don't recommend it as "common" practice... although you know where they are and can avoid tooling near 'em, no-one can predict what or who will happen to 'em after they've left your hands.
I "discovered" this method when trying to replace a stringer and destroyed a good japanese pull-saw while seperating the joint. I'm lucky it wasn't a power tool, I guess.
- Andy
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On Wed, 22 Jun 2005 16:38:48 +1000, "Andy McArdle"

Power tool (except for jointer or planer blades) wouldn't even notice a small brad. Not recommended practice, but something that small shouldn't adversely affect a good tablesaw blade.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Once or twice, I've inadvertently cut through a 4" nail on my tablesaw without any problem whatsoever. Never knew until I looked at the freshly cut edge and noticed a 3/16" shiny spot of metal glistening back at me. 1HP Table saw and carbide tipped blade took it without a hint complaint.
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Upscale wrote:

Generally not a problem. Mild steel cuts fairly easily if therre's only a tiny bit of it. I've never hit a 4" nail--and hope I don't--but brads and staples, sure, as have most of us.
You don't want to be like a friend of mine who hit a hardened nail, though. The carbide tips zinging by made him feel like he was back in 'Nam.
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I was actually thinking along different lines, but didn't want to be too verbose. :)
The stringer I was cutting free wasn't accessible to a table saw without dismantling more than I was prepared to do.
When I was younger (and invulnerable) I used to use a small circ blade in a 4" hand-grinder to do the same job... a tricky task at the best of times. I'm amazed I still have both hands complete with all ten thumbs. ;] Thankfully I've learned since then, which is why 'twas the pull-saw that was defanged.
May it RIP, I was very fond of that particular saw... it was the first japanese style hand-tool I owned and it changed many of my methods for the better.
--
- Andy
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[...]

There is an afterlife to saws as scrapers, specialty knifes, whatever-can-be-made-out-of-thin-tool-steel, so when it no longer rips it's not yet time for it ti RIP...
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Unfortunately, although I joint & set my own saws even then, I had no idea how to handle the Japanese style so I took it to a local sharpener in the hope he could resuscitate it. He took one look and pronounced it beyond recovery, so I simply left it with him. I regret it now, I suspect it was just as alien to him as it was to me at the time but that's part of the learning process, neh?
--
- Andy
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David wrote:

Good grief! Sand is going to screw up the joint fit and add an abrasive that will screw up later operations...little stuff, like knocking sharpness off any cutting tools used after glue-up. By itself, glue dulls tools. Adding sand...no thanks!
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You must not know the theory of glue. Glue is a chemical that swaps wood molecules from one piece to the other, thus making the joint the strongest part of the wood. The sand would only prevent the change. "David"

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Sounds more like quantum theory, not glue theory.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Lawrence Wasserman wrote:

I was thinking more on the line of alchemy... :)
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"W. Wells" wrote:

???
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David wrote:

What didn't you like about drilling for dowels? I do this for headplates and the underlying thin veneers on classical guitar heads - it's pretty standard.
JK
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James T. Kirby
Center for Applied Coastal Research
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I have plenty of drill bits but the dowel material on hand was slightly smaller than it's marked size and didn't match any standard bits. The closest size I could drill a hole was a bit too large for the dowel, making alignment more sloppy than I wanted. I'm always in search of a fast, fuss-free method to add to my repertoire of ww skills.
James T. Kirby wrote:

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David wrote:

...
I think the sand trick isn't it, myself, but guess it never hurts to "'spearmint"
The best trick I think is the very short, small brad/tack route someone else has already mentioned.
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I've read that someplace, and I heard somebody talk about it in a video or a TV show a long time ago, but they laughed after they said it. I thought it was joke, like telling the guy in the leaky rowboat to drill a few holes in the bottom so the water could run out.
Dan
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I can't remember where I read it, but it was a serious piece. Haven't been able to find a ref on line to the practice. If it isn't a common practice, I doubt I should waste my time doing a test with it (I stated yesterday I'd test it out).
Dave
Dan wrote:

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I've never tried it, but I have read of sprinkling a small bit of sharp sand onto a surface that has been coated with glue before the mating surface is brought into contact, to help prevent shifting of the 2 pieces. I've never seen anything about actually adding sand to the glue itself. i
One thing I have done a few times, is to put a few short brads between the pieces, then snip the heads off before clamping. If there weill be any more cutting operations after gluing you need to watch the brad placement of course.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Larry, I think the snipped brad idea is the quickest method for securing a number of laminations. I should have done that instead of drilling holes that really didn't fit the dowel I had on hand. Plus it would be much quicker to implement.
Dave
Lawrence Wasserman wrote:
Snip

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Thanks to all the suggestions and to the good-natured comments. I think the quickest/best way to accomplish alignment for the type of piece I was assembling (9 lams) would be the "snipped brad" method. Thanks to the guys who mentioned that.
Dave
David wrote:
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